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Discussion Starter #1
One of our bretheren here asked me how I reassemble my 1911s. I may be a little weird in the way I do it, but here goes . . .

Here's a neat little movie that shows the parts going together.
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v323/sv1cec/videos/?action=view&current=ReassemblyAnimationLR.flv

It's better than ANY graphic I could do, but I do things in a little different order. Here's how I reassemble my 1911s, along with some things to watch for that aren't in the video.

1. Completely reassemble the the MSH first because you'll need it in completed form to hold the flat spring in place later.
2. Install the trigger in the receiver. Do not install the mag catch yet, as shown in the video. If you leave it out, you can use the trigger to move the disconnector and sear up and down as you install them in the receiver, with the frame pointed toward the floor. I usually stick a thin punch (a paperclip will do) through the sear-pin hole from the opposite side to line things up, and then push it back out with the tip of the sear pin as I install the sear pin.
3. Install the hammer strut on the hammer with the strut pin.
4. Install the hammer in the pistol with the hammer pin.
5. Point the receiver back toward the floor, and flip the hammer strut up and over the hammer.
6. Install the plunger pins and spring.
7. Install the flat spring, and hold it in place with your thumb. (Make sure the tips are on top of the parts they're supposed to bear against. It's easy, for instance, to slip the tip of the sear spring under instead of on top.
8. Install the MSH part way just to hold the spring in place.)
9. Flip the hammer strut back down,

Now, here's where I do things a little weird, because I completely install the lower part of the GS and the MSH BEFORE I put the TS in. May be nuts, but it's just the way I do it.

10. I put the GS in place, but I don't install the TS to hold it. Instead, I just hold it in place by gripping it.
11. Then, I hold the whole deal up so that I can look into the gap between the top of the MSH and the bottom of the TS.
12. While gripping the bottom of the GS all the way in (depressed) and with the top of the GS still unfixed, I push the MSH farther up until it almost contacts the bottom of the GS but will still allow the bottom of the hammer strut to swing freely.
13. While watching the tip of the hammer strut, I tilt the receiver foward and backward just a little until the tip lines up with the hole in the top of the MSH. Once it does, then push the MSH the rest of the way up, and then install the MSH retaining pin through the frame and MSH. Again, the top of the GS is still loose in the tangs at this point.
14. Nest, I install the pins and spring into the plunger tube, cock the pistol, squeeze the top of the GS into position, and install the TS. If you need help getting the TS past the plunger pin, use a credit card to push the plunger in.
15. Then, I put the slide stuff together, install the slide on the gun, and I'm done.

Hope this helps!

Best,
Jon
 

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Interesting. Thats the way I put my 1911's back together also. The Series 80 models with the tricky dicky little firing pin blocker are slightly different. I always have to make mental note when I detail strip my Colt Officers, which isn't often. Have thought of removing the dumbstuff but haven't as the trigger is good enough as it is.

RIKA
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Interesting. The Series 80 models with the tricky dicky little firing pin blocker are slightly different.

No kiddin! I finally fumbled around long enough and found a way to get that darned plate back in the receiver. Hold the thing flat on its left side, slip the plate in above the sear's side, and then you can manipulate it with a prick punch through the mag well. I also stick a small-diameter punch (or, again a paperclip will work) through the right side of the hole (the top of the hole in this orientation) to get it to line up. It's a mess trying to do all that simultaneously.

Best,
Jon
 
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