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Discussion Starter #1
the "ringing" of the metal at the shot, is dampened a bit. the difference is audible, altho barely so. Running the can wet is worth quite a bit more, for a shot or 3, depending upon the design. I"ve never tried anything but a shot of wd40 and then a good trickle of water run into the front endcap, and the can rotated for a minute. If the can has a sleeve area, packed with single wrap screen, the wet effect lasts for about 50% more shots. If it has a wetted, screen packed underchamber, the effect is to about double the number of shots before more liquid is required. On a gun with the browning tilting barrel, the addition of water can render the can too heavy to let the slide cycle, if can weight is already marginal, as in 5 ozs.
 

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None of the suppressors I own ring when I shoot them.

The indicated problem sounds like a baffle kiss or something.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
nothing about a screeenwire donut can "ring", it's the tubing. I use as thin a tube as I can get, to reduce cost of production as well as weight,
 

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If we're talking about the sleeved design you mentioned, it's possible that the first core column / internal sleeve is creating an effect similar to an open pronged flash hider.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
it's noticable on the single tube version, also. I never saw the point in having to thread thick tubing, thread an endcap (or 2). If the tubing is running "true" in the lathe's steady rest and the cutter is at the proper height, you can cut an .025" deep groove in .050" wall thickness tubing, for the internal snapring that holds in the front endcap-washer. That's enough to hold the firing pressures of a .22lr can. For the 223 can, I made the washer, which is welded in between the inner tubing and the sleeve tube, at the front of the can, about 3/8" of an inch thick. Then I had no worries about cutting thru the internal tube when I made the snapring groove a bit deeper, to hold in the extra pressures of the 223's firing.

When I first made 223 cans, I was making aluminum spiral, like a wood drill bit, or welding washers onto steel tubing, for use as the expansion chamber. Until I figured out that I had to put holes in the "vanes" lengthwise, the hammer blows of each shot would shove forward the expansion chamber "filler", compressing the screenwire donut baffles, no matter HOW tightly packed I had made them. This created space for the expansion chamber filler piece to move front to back inside the can, making a very annoying "clank", wasting space inside of the can, and potentially causing baffle strikes. So the pressures inside of a 223 can are significant. PVC pipe is adquate to contain 22lr pressures. But a hi v rifle can must be made VERY precisely and very solidly, or you can get badly hurt when firing thru it. The snapring idea helps with that, since it is set to hold normal pressures, but will release if anything un-toward occurs. When it is ripped out of its groove, the baffles are all blown out of the can with it, saving your face and making it easy to look at them, to see if they can be re-used, or if they must be replaced.
 

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it's noticable on the single tube version, also. I never saw the point in having to thread thick tubing, thread an endcap (or 2). If the tubing is running "true" in the lathe's steady rest and the cutter is at the proper height, you can cut an .025" deep groove in .050" wall thickness tubing, for the internal snapring that holds in the front endcap-washer. That's enough to hold the firing pressures of a .22lr can. For the 223 can, I made the washer, which is welded in between the inner tubing and the sleeve tube, at the front of the can, about 3/8" of an inch thick. Then I had no worries about cutting thru the internal tube when I made the snapring groove a bit deeper, to hold in the extra pressures of the 223's firing.

When I first made 223 cans, I was making aluminum spiral, like a wood drill bit, or welding washers onto steel tubing, for use as the expansion chamber. Until I figured out that I had to put holes in the "vanes" lengthwise, the hammer blows of each shot would shove forward the expansion chamber "filler", compressing the screenwire donut baffles, no matter HOW tightly packed I had made them. This created space for the expansion chamber filler piece to move front to back inside the can, making a very annoying "clank", wasting space inside of the can, and potentially causing baffle strikes. So the pressures inside of a 223 can are significant. PVC pipe is adquate to contain 22lr pressures. But a hi v rifle can must be made VERY precisely and very solidly, or you can get badly hurt when firing thru it. The snapring idea helps with that, since it is set to hold normal pressures, but will release if anything un-toward occurs. When it is ripped out of its groove, the baffles are all blown out of the can with it, saving your face and making it easy to look at them, to see if they can be re-used, or if they must be replaced.
This is a small part of why welded baffles are a thing. With proper materials, one doesn't have to replace them either.
 
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