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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
is fairly simple, on an electronic timer, starting hands at sides, with a secure "speed rig", for a top hand. He can react, draw, get the first hit on the chest in .65 second, get the second chest hit in another .18 second, leaving him a full .65 second to raise the sights a bit and get the head shot. Yet with and FBI rig (openly worn) only a very few thousand on the face of the earth can get the first chest hit in 1.5 second. Only a few hundred can do so from a ccw belt rig.Moving at such speeds is a bit "hairy" when using cocked and locked, but it can be done.

IDPA considers it "master level" to achieve this above "Mozambique Drill", in 2.2 seconds, from an openly worn rig. :)
 

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IDPA considers it "master level" to achieve this above "Mozambique Drill", in 2.2 seconds, from an openly worn rig. :)
As an IDPA Master I can tell you the statement above is without foundation and totally false.

The last time I shot the IDPA classifier, all of my Mozambique times were sub two seconds. I have shot this drill countless times in 1.40 or less.
 

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So what Ron is really saying is that erika/gunkids, 28 year old timings are slow?

So how did you shoot in the Nationals in 1979, 1980? 1981? 1982? 1983? 1984? 1985? 1986? 1998? Well tell the rest of the story about your IPSC career!
 

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Actually, I am saying his coments about what "IDPA considers" is without merit. Andy's target math is just so bogus.

As for any "top" hand easily doing a .65 draw. Well sure Leatham, a younger Enos, and others have done that in speed shoots...but it ain't normal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've got big money that says you can't AVERAGE

under 1.60, 5 tries, 7 yds, 8" A zone, 6" circle for the head, hands at sides start, reacting to the beep of an electronic timer, using a concealable rig, behind the hip. :) I've got a fair amount of money that says you can't average under 1.80, too. Hack is the one that said 2.2 seconds is master level. I could easily have done it in 1.30, with a speed rig. Never worked that much with FBI rig, but could probably still demo 1.80 at it, with a bit of practice. Certainly could beat 2 full seconds, using a full size and wt 1911. For a guy to call himself a master, he should average under 2 seconds, ccw, with a lw Commander .45 and full charge ammo.
 

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Unfortunately erika/gunkid you have no credibility! So knock off the bs, please!
 

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Gunkid I have matched that time. You want to know how? The first shot is aimed at the bottom of the 8" circle (and is fired out of the notch). The second shot after recoil will hit near the top of the 8 inch circle, again the gun recoils and the third shot lands in the head. You ride the recoil down and the sights come right back to where you shot but just a bit higher. It's a bit like stitching. 1.6 seconds is not real hard. Any good kyndex holster will give you that speed.

Of course you didn't know that cause you haven't shot in so long you are unaware of techniques that have been invented in the last 30 years (if ever you have done anything but read gun mags.)
 

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Andy, your sole intent here is to discredit everyone on the face of the planet while trying to make yourself look good. You are not now, nor have you ever been a world class shooter. That's just a fact. BTW, I said I shot the drills in the classifier match in under 2 seconds. I have shot them in practice fooling around in under 1.40 seconds.

I have never claimed to be a world class shooter because I am not a world class shooter. That is a fact. However, I have current Master cards in all five USPSA Divisions and 2 of the 5 IDPA divisions (CDP and SSP). My card is on view in another thread. If you will take the time to surf on over to the USPSA website you will see I am no big whoop in Limited, Limited 10 or Open. However, I have shot GM scores in all three of those divisions for classification purposes, but I am not consistent enough to earn the card and I lack big match experience. I am currently the 9th highest (for classification purposes) master in Production division and I am (again for classification purposes) the third highest ranked Master class revolver shooter. I don't care if you consider me a master or not. FWIW, I also have also held M class or better in PPC, Bullseye, and NRA Action Pistol. Again, not world class, but not shabby for an old fart from podunk.

OK, so I am a putz in your eyes. So be it. News flash Andy, I shoot my gear, in my games, according to their rules. I am not going to swap out my gear to play your silly assed games with rules that change like drifting sand. Andy, 223, GK, John, tard, TheMan, whatever your name is, stop being so delusional. Your target math gives you away as a fraud. Here's an example:

He can react, draw, get the first hit on the chest in .65 second
The distance is 7 yards. That's nonsense andy and you know it. In his film "Secrets of a Professional Shooter", Ron Avery demos some darned fast draws at about 5 yards and his best times are in the .72-.75 range. In Matt Burkett's 4th tape of his IPSC series he demos hands at sides draws on a target at spitting distances. His best draws are .72-.75. Hint, hint.

As long as I am on a roll. I don't have video of top flight shooters doing Mozambigue Drills, but I do have video of the 1988 Steel Challenge. Look at the event Double Trouble. It's pretty close to a Mozambique, with one plate above another. The difference is there is one shot on the lower plate intead of a double. The plate is 12 inches and it is at spitting distance. Time to first shot in a match, on that big assed plate in 1988 were as follows:

Rob Leatham - .85
Ken Tapp (one of the fastest draws alive from your leather slap days) - .84
Chip McCormick - .93
J. Michael Plaxco - .92
Jerry Barnhart - .92
Brian Enos - .82 seconds

Enos won that event. It is a known fact in shooting that the time to the first shot is always slower when subsequent shots are required than when one shot is fired. That's why none of the top shooters easily put a round COM in .65 seconds on a multiple shot drill, in fact they don't do it all. I guess Leatham, Barnhart, and Enos are all incompetent bozos according to your standards.

Why stop now??? OK, I'll keep going. In his book, "Pactical Shooting - Beyond the Fundamentals" on page 176 we find this little jewel, a chart of Brian's draw times when he was at his peak. Brian's predictable time to a ten inch plate at 7 yards was .85 seconds. His Limits of Human Function time was .70 seconds. Yes, this was an IPSC start with race gear, not "your gear". I'll quote Mr. Enos, "It's hard for me to realistically hit a 10 inch plate plate at 7 yards much faster than .7 seconds." Oh my, that's in the same ball park as Avery and Burkett shooting paper even closer yardage. But you would have us believe any top hand can easily hit COM in .65 seconds. WTF are you trying to peddle?

Wanna talk about your .80 turning draw next?
 

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DING DING DING

We have a knock down, Ankey return to your corner and wait for a signal that 223fan has been able to get back to his feet and can continue this match.

Looks like a knock out to me folks.
 

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polesmoker, it's not a knockout, it's a massacre. Truely is't a crime to beat up on a mentaly challenged poster, isn't it? Ankeny is so far ahead of gunkid that gunkid needs a telescope to see Ankeny's shoes.
 

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I think the "Mozambique Drill" is a very practicle drill in case ypu encounter a person wearing body armor ypur pistol will not penetrate. It is based on an actual incident in the Mozambique Airport. The international IPSC champion wae attacked by a man in body armor armed with an AK-47. The IPSC shoter invented the "Mozambique Drill" on the spot. He won.
 

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From an Internet search

As time passes we discover that there are a good many readers who have not been to school and who are puzzled by our reference to "The Mozambique Drill."
I added The Mozambique Drill to the modern doctrine after hearing of an experience of a student of mine up in Mozambique when that country was abandoned. My friend was involved in the fighting that took place around the airport of Laurenco Marquez. At one point, Mike turned a corner was confronted by a terrorist carrying an AK47. The man was advancing toward him at a walk at a range of perhaps 10 paces. Mike, who was a good shot, came up with his P35 and planted two satisfactory hits, one on each side of the wishbone. He expected his adversary to drop, but nothing happened, and the man continued to close the range. At this point, our boy quite sensibly opted to go for the head and tried to do so, but he was a little bit upset by this time and mashed slightly on the trigger, catching the terrorist precisely between the collar bones and severing his spinal cord. This stopped the fight.

Upon analysis, it seemed to me that the pistolero should be accustomed to the idea of placing two shots amidships as fast as he can and then being prepared to change his point of aim if this achieves no results. Two shots amidships can be placed very quickly and very reliably and they will nearly always stop the fight providing a major-caliber pistol is used and the subject is not wearing body armor. However, simply chanting "two in the body, one in the head" oversimplifies matters, since it takes considerably longer to be absolutely sure of a head shot than it does to be quite sure of two shots in the thorax. The problem for the shooter is to change his pace, going just as fast as he can with his first pair, then, pausing to observe results or lack thereof, he must slow down and shoot precisely. This is not easy to do. The beginner tends to fire all three shots at the same speed, which is either too slow for the body shots or too fast for the head shot. This change of pace calls for concentration and coordination which can only be developed through practice.

Mike Rouseau was later killed in action in the Rhodesian War. May he rest in peace!
 
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