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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Several weeks ago, a friend of mine showed up with an old, cheap .22 rifle. I can't find a manufacturer's name on it, except perhaps "PREMIER", which is says on the side of the receiver. Other than that, the only marking I could find was ".22 Long Rifle" on the barrel.

This is a cheap old .22. The parts are stamped, and even the trigger guard is screwed into the stock with wood screws. However, it does have a nice, long, heavy barrel, and I couldn't stand to not fool with it.

The gun had been stored in an old warehouse for decades. A dirt dauber had even built a nest in the muzzle. The gun was grimey, greasy, and just plain dirty. It was also rusted shut.

I started taking the thing apart, and it was very simple to do. It's a single shot, and I managed to get everything apart, cleaned, and reassembled. I even sanded down the old stock and refinished it. Everything is slick as a cat now, except for one thing ...

It won't fire. ... More specifically, it appears that the firing pin strike is too light.

Problem is, I have never seen a bolt like this, and I don't know how to fix the problem.The bolt is a two-piece affair. The firing pin looks at first blush like it ought to be the extractor - it has a lobe at its back end that fits into a recess in the back half of the bolt, and its main body lies inside an external dovetail in the front half of the bolt, its end protruding out into the concave bolt face.

The combination sear and trigger spring is flat, and it is screwed onto the bottom front of the receiver (this one with an obvioius replacement screw and a lock washer!) It was so weak that I had to do a little bending on it to coax a bit more tension out of it.

One cocks the piece by pulling on the rear of the bolt. The back half retracts and the sear catches a grove in the bottom of the back half of the bolt and locks it back. The back half takes the firing pin with it. The sear is integral to the spring and does not move. As the trigger is pulled, it levers the flat mainspring downward taking the sear with it, and the back half of the bolt is released. As the rear half of the bolt moves forward at the direction of a coil spring inside the back half of the bolt, it takes the firing pin with it, pushing it down the channel in the front half of the bolt and into the rim of the cartridge.

I have also noticed that the front half of the bolt is actually just a hair loose, even when closed, and the bolt handle has nothing to close down on - it just sits there against the side of the port, and when the rifle is dry fired, the handle even moves up about an eightj of an inch. (Yes, I know, ... it's worn out.)

Have any of you ever seen a bolt like this? Am I correct in my guess that the old firing pin is just worn too short to hit the rim hard enough to fire the round?

Best,
Jon
 

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i think your right in as to it being worn-out! if when it's cocked and when released [by the trigger] the bolt is doing it's job, the firing pin,,or,,chamber?
as back then the "handy-guys" liked to ream those cheapy .22lr's out to .22mag,,,,sounds like a 'spitter' to me, with the bolt movement[but trust me, it' locking up in battery somewhere ]

good-luck big-jon.
 

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A photo of the bolt would help.

RIKA
 

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Discussion Starter #4
lol! Yea, I know... I know.

If I get time to charge up the camera battery tonight, I'll post a couple.

JC
 

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Make a lamp out of it. Seriously, I've went through this with a Sears/Winchester single shot. It would fire when you hand cocked the striker. After realizing I had spent enough time into it to buy a new Ruger 10/22, I gave it a decent burial and bought a synthetic stock 10/22. Hey. your not resurecting a Colt SAA. Forget it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
"Make a lamp out of it" lol! That's a WHALE of a good idea! Actually, it'd make a pretty lamp - the wood is nice and clean now, and the barrel is actually long enough to make a floor lamp (if you don't mind sittin' on the floor instead of the sofa when you read).

Yep, this one was doing exactly that - firing when cocked. Found that the sear was cheap metal as you'd expect, and so is the bolt housing, and both were worn. Did a little judicious re-angling of both the sear and the notch in the bolt housing with my moto tool (no fine work here!), so it doesn't do that any more. Of course, as I said earlier, I had to bend the flat sear spring to regain enough tension for it all to hold, but hey, whatever it takes, right?

Of course, you are absolutely right - this gun is not worth working on in a monetary sense, but I just like foolin with stuff when I'm home in the evenings. From a therapy standpoing, the excercise is invaluable!

Best,
Jon
 

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Don't take me wrong, Big Jon, I really wasn't trying to be a smart ass. It's just my warped sense of humour. A couple of years ago my nephew gave me a rusted solid revolver that he had found in his back yard. My keen eye picked it out for a .38 Smith&Wesson 2ndmodel break open. Has to be worth some gold, right? I worked and worked, bought solvents, rust removers, steel wool by the pound. When I removed the last rust from the top rib, I read "Iver Johnson" and realized I had taken MYSELF to the cleaners. I fired it with gloves and a motorcycle helmet with a face shield on to salvage some pride. Gun's are so much fun.
 

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Actually, from an entirely experimental standpoint, restoring the old revolver and the 22 rifle has some bit of value; at least in my mind. You learn to carefully disassemble them, you can make replacement parts as needed, practice drawfiling and polishing the metal, blueing, and even wood repair or replacement. Even if the object of your attention has little if any monetary value after you've finished you are still ahead. You've learned or improved valuable mechanical skills, reduced your blood pressure and spend some good time doing something thats very enjoyable. What you've learned even from mistakes will be valuable when you eventually find that rusty old S&W Russian Model 44 or whatever. At least thats my take on things.

RIKA
 

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Discussion Starter #9
OH, NO, Terry! You read me all wrong - I really WAS laughin' - great idea! See, the beauty of this is that no matter how bad I end up FUBARin' the gun, hey, all I've lost is a nice paperweight - remember, she doesn't fire anyway! So, your idea is a great one. I have been lookin' all around, and over on e-gunparts, I found some similar schematics in the old Stevens and Marlin rifles, but I just can't find one with a full length flat-bar spring that screws on the bottom of the receiver. This is getting to be fun. I'm gonna keep lookin'.

And hey, if my eyes get tired, I now know where I can put my hands on a great lamp.

Best,
Jon
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Oh, and nice pistol - I have an old H&R .22 that's dang near its clone (in form AND condition!)
 

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Big Jon, I'm keeping it. WHen I look at it, it reminds me that I'm not as smart as I think I am.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Terry G said:
Big Jon, I'm keeping it. WHen I look at it, it reminds me that I'm not as smart as I think I am.
Geez, Terry! That's the funniest looking housecat I've ever seen! Where did you get him????

I have not had time to take photos of the rifle, but I will (I promise)! In the meantime, is there a way to lengthen the firing pin? Remember, it is external and would not bind anywhere by being lengthened. All it needs is a hair's width more in length. Can it be hard soldered to lengthen it by that hair? It's too hard to lengthen by hammering (believe me - I've already tried it).

Best,
Jon
 

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Your hardware store has MAPP-o2 welding kits for $50. Solder is not hard enough for a firing pin tip, but for a seldom used .22, welding might prove serviceable. Can you gas weld? It's very simple to learn. I've taught guys to do pretty well in just half an hour.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Good info, Andy. Thanks for the tip.

Best,
Jon
 
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