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Discussion Starter #1
I am assembling a .270 Wea Mag, ie;stock change out,
but haven't done anything to the Action etc and have full length epoxy bedded it,using the two pressure tabs in the forearm as "reference" for the pressure duplication. Has anyone done this type of bedding w/ Weatherby(a 26" fluted#2) or have any "experienced" advice on same? I've
ranged it and gotten 1"1/2-3" groups-eratic, so I hung 5.5
lbs from the swivel location, and got some separation. I installed temp shims, and the grouping improved-.75"-which is ok I guess using 150H wea ammo. I can't find any data for torque on the action screws, and specific pressure point info- any advice?(this barrel doesn't like to be floated).And finally anybody found a good accuracy loading/spec w/ H4831 or RL-25?
 

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i've seen this problem on a couple of fluted wetherby rifles in the past few years. from what i can remember it has to do with the occillation fequency of the barrel at it's given length. the guy's that had them had the barrel set back and rechambered to solve there problem. i don't think full length bedding the barrel and action will give you the results you are looking for. this is essspecilly true if carding the barrel about 2 inches from the stock tip fails to correct your problem. well LOL with it its a pain when you put that much money into a rifle and it shoot as good as an old sears rebuild. i've had my share of rifles that just wouldn't shoot no matter what i did until i got hammer and chisle mad about it. LOL :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
barrel osc'ing etc....

The funny thing is , the first rifle I was intending to do bedding work on was mine, -never having done it before, but with more advice than I could keep track of... anyway,
at around 23:00(11 pm), on my first elk hunt invite, the lodge owner finds out I'm going to bed my forend tip(alright, I immediatly had to free float it-before the press point info came along-it shot like sh#$, so an "old guy" gave me some advice....hence the bedding "experiment) and wants me to do his pet .257-GREAT -never one to let a good chance to make a fool of myself pass by-I said "um,ok-I haven't done it before though"-"Oh hell, dave, I trust you...."-back to 23:00 hrs, and as "advised", I hung as prescribed , a half gallon of milk, and a quart of oil from the forend swivel, used weather stripping to contain the epoxy, and more praying to any thing, and low and behold , the next morning , he returned from a pre-hunt re-sight in, scowl evident(and me thinking ,well [email protected]#
so much for elk hunting in colorado anymore)-then he showed me a target with a tiny little clover leaf, all of .36".
I did try this with my .270wm, but ofcourse, it apparently doesn't like the same diet. Though full length bedded, I used tape-AND release agent(to keep from trapping the flutes) so possibly, that space needs to be made up??? The full length bedding utilised a layer of glass/carbon fiber and really was to help stiffen the stock-which it did, but your observation has me wondering about tension applied full length, or tension applied at a specific point only?
Sorry to ramble- just my experience so far!
thanks-
Dave
 

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In the older Weatherby Mk.V the fore end pressure point bedding was 13-15 lbs. according to Weatherby . The fluted barrel could contact two points in the stock at a 45 degree angle from vertical only -no contact on the bottom. I found the best way was to bed the rifle action stress free with the barrel just clearing the inletting and bed the fore end points as a seperate step when the first part cured . I bed only the area around the guard screws -taping my clearance on the action center section .The bottom of the recoil lug is a bearing point and must be bedded.Let cure for four days and go on to part two. Then I mount the stock with the required weight on the front sling swivel stud- put a small amount of compound in the fore end and set the barreled action in the stock tightning the guard screws as normal. ( 40 inch pounds is good )
Ultra Light Arms beds rifles full length in the stock . It probably be interesting to talk to them about this method.
Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No '6 O'clock in the forend press....

I missed that little tidbit about no contact at 6 O'clock, but that would describe the factory points that I used as forend bedding reference, and damn if I didn't ASSume that was done to help keep the barrel centerlined and prevent it from "bouncing"(its LATE/...EARLY??-so a good technical term eluded me) off the stock press pt while firing(kinda like setting your barrel on a hard surface and firing). I have seen two distinctly different lengths of the contact point also, ones about 2-3mm(fore/aft, not around the clock) right at the f/end tip, and the other was a good deal longer, and set farther back.????????????-both on #2's
that were not fluted, mine was fluted after the fact with the
6 Oclock flute matching up with the gap at same. :eatpointe , another odd contradiction is the very short oals(and very long necks) factory rounds are seated to, versus seating long(closer to the lands.....)-especially considering how "scary tight" some of the MKV's are out of the box(with factory ammo) HMMMMMM?
 

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A excellent book that I'm sure will interest you on this subject and more is RIFLE ACCURACY FACTS By Harold Vaughn available at :http://precisionshooting.com/books.html .
The Weatherby factory ammunition shoots very accurately because of the high quality of the componets and assembly.I had a batch of 7 mm 160 Nosler Norma loaded factory that shot extremely well - loaded cartridges had .001 run out in concentricity and the powder charges on 5 examined varied less than 1/10 of a grain.In this case the jump to the lands was .020.The fired cases were weighed and found to vary less than .5 gr.-some of the best brass I've ever seen including BR cases.The NRA Handloading book has cartridge and chamber specs for Weatherby ammunition in the back. (Try interlibrary loans.)If you examine these you will find they are tighter(neck etc) and better designed than most factory cartridges in my opinion. I have found Forester (Bonanza)dies to match the factory Weatherby chambers . The throats while long are parallel and very tight -.0005 over the maximum bullet diameter.
A bit more information would help-which stock -wood? are you using now.All stocks are not equal or set up the same for best results.Your rifle is shooting well now I understand. A good bore guide and cleaning materials will help to get consistant results.
For release agent use "Kiwi" Neutral shoe polish . I clean the barreled action with mek and tape my clearances -check fit in stock with tape -then heat the metal until warm to the touch with a spot light (about 12" distance ). I apply a thin coat of wax with Q-tips and a square of clean cotton cloth. Let sit for ten minutes and buff with another clean cotton cloth. You can do the stock also to make clean up easier.

Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The stock is a modified black syn., full length bedded to the pressure point-with epoxy,carbon fiber, glass -laminnated around some foam cores-oh, and WAY too much time. Increasing the fore end press(originally, this was at the very tip of the forend, where as my wood stock had this at a point @ 1-2" back.)afterward, seemed to work.Possibly, the issue may be a bit muddy , but the stock
is made for a 24", and the 26"-and I don't recall whether the catalog listed one, or both.
The factory stuff shoots great, the reloads are another story though, always throws two-close together, and one high or low to the out side-in no repititive order.Using redding dies and Weatherby hulls under 130's, and 135
sierra hpbts-the seating die doesn't have any means of keeping the bullet in line initially,so that may be it???? :headbang:
gnslngr
 

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since you won't be shooting crows or prairie dogs with it, why bother with such accuracy? also, for big game or sniping, you probably won't be able to fire from prone, and the wind, mirage, target movement, etc, all easily add up to mean more than the diff between 1" and 1.5" groups at 100 yds.
 

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andy said:
you probably won't be able to fire from prone, and the wind, mirage, target movement, etc, all easily add up to mean more than the diff between 1" and 1.5" groups at 100 yds.
One dosent need to fire from prone to group well, JD. Also, consistent accuracy for shooting over a mere 100 yards may be a concern for him. The cartridge he is using is way more than a 100 yard cartridge.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
half inch @ 100, means 3"@600....

Generally speaking, better at short(100m/yds) distances, means also better at long distances. We lost "user privileges", to the close long distance "range":)20 min away), even though it was a level horse pasture, in its first life, it was a quick ride to 400 yds of open range. That was about 6 mos after obtaining the .270 WM, so no load development had started as of yet. We would usually shoot in/group at 100, then follow w/singles at 200, and 300m, using same point
of aim to get trajectories verified-called flyers would bring
"re-shots", but only one , as that was based on the fact that, generally, the first shot is the one that counts most.
Where we are, the humidity is the biggest variable-generally between 60-90%, add that to x-wind(higher the humidity, the stronger the effect of wind drift for a relative velocity is our experience)and at 2-300m ranges the difference is very evident. If its really thick and windy(prevailing winds are almost dead cross at this location)
you can see it at 100. The 100 was the range with the least amount variable affectation-so even under generally
non long range conditions- the feedback would be fairly viable. Yes, we shoot the longer ranges with singles on these days also, but as a rule, the results were treated as
being less viable. We would also use the 200/300 singles
for long term groups-ie, using same point for trag.checks,
and changing the distance for whatever the next anticipated zero range(governed by where and what was to be hunted-elk was 200/250 depending and local deer at 100,150 as we have little wide open range). The groups would be obtained by stacking the consecutive targets per given range. Now, we are limited by the sheriffs range length-you guessed it-100yds.
As to why bother with the little groups for such a big target(elk when we head out west, deer and hogs here)
is because when you "GET TIGHT" , any results afterwards are more indicative of your shooting techniques-and THAT in my experience, can be the biggest variable of all-and the
most important. IE:The better you know your rifle and load, and how much each is limited by the other, the better you can overcome variables encountered in the field. :cool:
Hope that nailed the answer for you.
Dave
 
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