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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been reading the January 2016 edition of "Guns & Weapons for Law Enforcement" magazine and they have a very interesting article on suppressors built by Delta P Design. It is a fascinating read on some of their Brevis II Suppressors manufactured by 3D printing. Impressive weight and length and minimal maintenance.

Model Caliber Weight Length Diameter Material
Brevis II 5.56 5.56mm 11.5 3.7 2.0 Inconel
Brevis II Ultra 5.56 5.56mm 7.5 3.7 2.0 Titanium
Brevis II Ultra 6.5 6.5mm 7.3 5.5 1.4 Titanium
Brevis II 7.62 7.62mm 16.0 5.5 2.0 Inconel
Brevis II Ultra 7.62 7.62mm 10.0 5.5 2.0 Titanium
Brevis II Ultra 8.6 8.6mm 10.0 5.5 2.0 Titanium
 

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I seriously doubt that something so short can give you more suppression than just to overcome immediate deafness. A good 223 can renders full power ammo no more noisy than a normal .22lr rifle, and that's the sonic crack, not the muzzleblast. I was able to achieve exactly that in a can that was 8.5" long and 1.750" OD, with 1" of that being subtended around the rifle's threads.
 

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when you sleeve the 1.250 OD can, full length and fill the rear 2.5" of internal tube with freezeplugs and vent that area into the sleeve area, and fill that sleeve area with a wrap of stainless (rear 3" of area) screenwire and the rest of that sleeve area with copper screeenwire, a LOT of the highest temp and pressure gas is diverted away from the front (screen donut) baffles. As the gas passes over/thru the wraps of screen, a helluva lot of heat and blast energy is lost to the wire filaments. then said gases go back into the main baffle stack, after much of the gas there is reduced in energy, of course, and get absorbed by the baffles. So the can, made this way, is very, verry efficent, yet it is easily home-built, saving you $1000 per can.
 

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where do people get the stupid idea that they have to fire 1000's of rds thru their silencers, anyway? Until shtf, you dont need the can. and because the can renders the 223 just as tame to use as the .22 unit without the can, you can do most of your practice with .22, saving yourself 30c per shot. If you shoot so much, that will pay for the home-built can in one month. including the $200 stamp and the charges for your local machine shop. You can do most of the work yourself. just have them drill and bore the center hole in the freeze plugs, make the baffle forming kit, and face off the ends of the 2 tubes, make the rear adapter plug, cut the groove for the internal snapriing that retains the front "endcap" washere, and the threaded adapter for the rear of the can. I've had shops do this for me, scattering the work around to several and none of them knew what they had really done. :)

because the aluminum endplug is welded into the rear of the aluminum tubing and aluminum won't "hold" fine silencer threads, the 1/2 x28 threads have to be cut into a steel bolt, which was threaded into the aluminum rear end plug. the hole for both is not just drilled, but also precision bored. drilled holes are always out of rd and reaming them wont make them concentric to the tube of the can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Try reading the article, apparently your grasp on technology has been superseded !
 

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3-D printing allows for shapes and structures impossible to machine.

The engineering involved allows for incredibly effective suppressors. They can make smaller, more effective units.
 
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