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without any debris. 2.3 ozs each. One liner gets wrapped around your head/neck, one is punctured for your head and worn like a poncho and the other 2 are wrapped around your legs. Given half a lb of UCO lantern beeswax candle, you can sit around at 40F in wind and rain, but you wont get any sleep, without debris. This includes the extended base and the reflector, rigged up to extend the base even more. You MIGHT be able to nap a bit, given some sedatives, leaning against a tree.

It wont take more than one night for the lantern and your body heat to dry out enough debris to let you sleep ok at 30F, if you've got armor and are out of the rain/wind. . If you have no armor, it will take all night to dry out enough debris with your body heat and the UCO, or you'll have to use 4 discrete dakota fire pits to heat hot rocks. Use a "bed" of hot rocks to dry-out the debris faster.

By the time that you're done drying out the 2 bushels of compressed dry debris, the hot rocks will also have warmed and dried out the ground a bit. Stuff your buttpack and day pack with sticks, shaking the water off of the sticks first. wtf are you doing out there without your packs? How will you carry anything, in your arms, dumbass?

Slit open the drum- liners, use a single layer of the 4 mm thick plastic to wrap around yourself, and the 3-4" of compressed dry debris. 2 of the drum liners suffice to this, to include making a hood, booties and mittens with the debris, plastic and duct tape.

With care in its use, 3/4" wide duct tape will suffice for a lot of jobs. So you can cut the tape at its midpoint on the roll, all of the way around and then tear it in half, lengthwise. This means that a 50 ft length of the 1.5" wide tape will go a long ways for you. Use the duct tape to assemble a couple of the liners into one sheet, Lay this sheet over you, with you on the heated ground, with cold rocks holding down the edges of the plastic, and hot rocks in a ring around your body. Bury the coals in the Dakota pit ashes and they will let you reignite the fires for many hours. Use sedatives and you'll sleep ok at 20F, with this minimal gear and some knowledge,

20F will kill you in a very few hours if you dont have at least this much protection. Ditto wind and rain at 35F. This will let you stuggle thru a night at 0F, too, altho you'll have to exercise and not sleep. There's no excuse to not have 2.5 lbs of pack and 2.5 lbs of gear, to include some cordage, a couple of peanut lighters, condoms to use as canteens, a water filter. water treatment pills, some antibiotics, "go and no" piles, some Ace knee wraps, liquid bandage, you can carry quite a bit of compressed dry debris in a drum liner, lashed to your pack It has to be really hot for a jacket, ski mask and gloves to not be welcome when it's raining and windy. One of the 1/4 bugnet suits is enough., and you can quickly build enough of a platform to get you up in the breezes if you dont want the 1 lb of the net hammock. 12 lbs, or packs and gear, including 1/2 gallon of water and lb of rations, with the ability to make fire, and a day hike wont become a nightmare-death sentence just cause it rains, gets cold and you badly sprain an ankle. Add 2 lbs of pocket 9mm, holster, mag pounch and a spare mag of ammo, and you'll be better prepped than 99% of those who go on day hikes.
 

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Mel missed his calling in life, he should have been a comedy writer. Ex con doper wrapped up in garbage head to toe with a pocket nine, what a sight to see.
A LESSON TO ANYBODY READING THIS TRASH! Leave the drugs alone. Look what it did to the person above.
 

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A lot depends on what you're accustomed to, because what one person finds totally fine could be near agony for someone else. When growing up on a farm in Michigan, my brother and I would check the thermometer outside the front window before going out. Forty degrees was our benchmark - if it was 40 or above, we didn't bother with a jacket. Now, being older and having lived most of my life in the south, at 40 degrees I definitely want a jacket.

I may have mentioned before, but when my wife & I went to mexico last march, we'd just gone thru a record-setting blizzard here in our area. We got down there, and while the ~60 degree early morning temps felt glorious to me, I saw one local actually wearing insulated carhartt-type pants and coat while I was enjoying the 'warmth'. What made me warm and want to nap by the ocean, made him physically shiver.
 
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That is like when I went back working for the UofA Engineering dept for the last time. Initially driving the shuttle van up to the Bell Engineering building on the main campus.
Because most didn't own a vehicle stateside I'd say 80-90% of my student passengers were the exchange students.
I'd be in short sleeve shirts and they'd be wearing jackets or coats and freezing I'd have the heat on but my window down so as not to sweat to death.
 

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if you require sedatives to sleep in your gear, it is the wrong gear. Period.
Using sedatives is a recipe for disaster. At least you'll already be bagged, just waiting to be tagged.
 

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And all the plastic materials I'd be concerned about hypoxia.
 

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He sure has a fixation on garbage bags. Popping "Downers" in a cold weather survival situation is too stupid to contemplate.
 
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