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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
a bit of bullseye over the primer, then a layer of Unique, then some 2400. This has to be a compressed charge, held immobile by the bullet's pressure. If the powders are allowed to mix, sooner or later, you'll get a detonation instead of combustion and blow up your gun.

I've thought about using a layer of .22lr powder under the main charge of Alliant Bullseye powder, to get 70 gr Split Noses to 2400 fps in the Commander, using .45 Super brass and not bother with the .460 brass and re-chambering.

In order to attain this velocity safely, the rifling would have to be converted to "Paradox" style. The rear 1.7" of the rifling in the commander's 4.2" long barrel would be reamed out, leaving that portion of the barrel "smoothbore" and still leaving you with 2.5" of rifling near the muzzle. The hollowbase "skirt' of the bullet will "upset' enough to seal the powder gases behind it and the lack of initial resistance to the bullet's travel will lower the chamber pressures ( a LOT). This trick will (safely) let you load more powder under the bullet. Roy Weatherby used this trick of "free-boring" to gain 100 fps or more with his magnum rifle cartridge designs. He also used 26" barrels, gaining about 100 fps over the (testing standard)24" barrels.

The Nazi's used constricted bores in their AA belt-feds, so as to raise muzzle velocity of the projectiles.(a helluva lot)

This load would probably have horrendous flash, unless you mixed a bit of FFFG black powder in with the Bullseye. It would doubtless have horrific blast. 900 ft lbs, tho, in a CCW pistol, Could also be an 80 gr, hollowbased swc, at 2200 fps, 870 ft lbs, for use on big critters. Sort of beats the crap out of the 5.7 FN, powerwise, eh? :) Such solid copper bullets (swc AND the split nose segmented bullet) pierce both sides of a GI steel helmet, at pistol combat type ranges. They pierce Kevlar vests, too. Colonel wesson took grizzly and elk with an 850 ft lb load in an 8" 357.

I first read about the hollowbasing trick in a 1966 (IIRC) guns and ammo mag article. The French THV/Arcane ammo-makers used it to (safely) get 45 gr 9mm's to 2400 fps in 5" barrels.

The 2.5" of rifling would give you plenty of handgun combat type accuracy, but i"m not sure that it would suffice for hunting type accuracy. Ross Siefried used this idea in a 7.5" barreled .45 Colt Ruger, with the goal of using shot cartridges (mostly). He said he got 2.5" groups at 25 yds, using heavy for caliber cast swc bullets.

Louis Seman, old time smith and the guy who got the ISP to go with the 9mm M39 S&W in 1970, converted either a M39 or 9mm 1911 (I forget which) to .30 luger. IIRC correctly, I think that he made a barrel liner for the 9mm bore. This was in the .70's, guys. Some gunmen are generations ahead of the normal run of gunowners, as to their thinking and attainments.
 

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Extra-light bullets let you do a lot with velocity, if extra-light bullets are acceptable for your application. Experimented with some very-light bullets a few years ago, using XTP-Mag jackets filled with epoxy rather than lead. The .452 240 XTP-Mag jackets ended up at 80-82 grains after drying. Loaded with Titegroup, working gradually from 8.0 to 10.0 grains, I ended up at 2459fps with an 82-grain bullet, without exceeding Ruger/TC-only .45LC pressures. Lot of muzzle blast, but very low actual recoil.

Target/backstop for chrono testing was made up of several layers - one layer of 3/4" plywood followed by three layers of 7/16" OSB (normal house-construction sheathing), with a thick pine timber as a final backer. The 82-grain with 10.0 grains of titegroup penetrated the plywood, the three layers of OSB, and a little over one inch into the backing timber. Better penetration than I expected from a bullet with a sectional density so crazy light.

Didn't pursue it much beyond that, as that's lighter than I like in that large a bullet for most purposes; but on small/medium animals like feral dogs & such, I believe that it could be a stellar performer.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would not count on anything made of epoxy on live targets. :) BUT, such velocities should be attainable with any same caliber, same weight bullet. if that bullet is solid copper, hollowbased, hollowpointed and slit down the middle, almost to the point of separation, it WILL break in half at impact, after penetration of skin and ribs/sternum. Considering the forces and liquids involved, the chances of the 2 pieces remaining together as they penetrated the "hittee". would be small. Given adequate energy/mass, they will tear diverging wound channels.

John, what barrel length did you use? I never had any interest in such loads for revolvers, and was constrained to use Bullesye to get the slides to cycle.
 

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Gun was my ruger SRH in .454 after I had the barrel shortened from 7.5" down to 5". Figured the .454 gun made a safer test bed than a .45LC gun.

On the epoxy thing, only downside I see is absence of expansion. The epoxy is in the same hard jacket as the lead-based bullets are; and since epoxy is both harder and more structurally sound than lead it's almost certain to not expand. But penetration was better than I'd expected, and at that speed it would likely give rifle-like performance as far as temporary- and permanent-cavity damage. Just not sure how much a bullet that lightweight, at that large diameter, would penetrate in a live target. On a 50-60 pound animal, probably fine; on a 250 pound thug, maybe or maybe not...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
you don't have to risk it. and you wouldn't be carrying a 454 anyway. slit the solid copper ("Split Nose". ) hp thru its center, lengthwise, until the bottom of the kerf just barely retains the strength to fly thru the air in one piece. At impact, you are guaranteed to get a couple of large segments, diverging as they penetrating. they will be yawing as they travel, perhaps even tumble. Due to the >2200 fps impact speed, the termporary gas cavity WILL be able to permanently damage organ tissues that have not been actually touched by the bullet segments. Any such tissues that fall between the 2 (already massive) wound channels will be destroyed by the overlapping cavities caused by the expanding gases. So you wind up with 1"x2" hole (average) thru the guy, with every hit.
 
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