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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My small lexan french press I use for backpacking is toast! Broken! FUBAR!

I must acquire another fast or - shudder - resort to instant coffee.
:(
 

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OH YOU POOR BASTARD!!!!...the horror....the horror.....the ...

OK ,before I start channeling Col. Kurz(which would require me to gain about 150 lbs,lose my hair and get medievally murderous!) ,I'd recommend the Gevalia.com,or the smilescoffe .com....Peet's might also have some of the makings for the portably-pottable(and civilized)coffee for those who rough it without wanting to live like the rural homeless....
I go back& froth between the Irish Breakfast black teas, the green teas,and playing with my coffee grinder.Usually 1 part expresso di roma beans with cafe bustelo or pilon works well.....as of late I've grown to appreciate Trader Joe's Smooth&Mello(brown coffee)with a shot of Chase&Sandborn can be another good way to face the AM roll out.I tend to not take caffeine after breakfast,but what I need AT breakfast could be the South Park(Tweaker's Blend) corporate sponsorship....... :nuts:
 

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I've never bothered to heat a drink, and done damned little heating of food, while backpacking. The Tang makes water drinkable, and mixed with the oatmeal and peanut butter, renders that stuff as "spoon-eatable" as cookie dough. I'm out there to test myself and my gear, work on fitness, etc, not to play chef in the woods.
 

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andy said:
I've never bothered to heat a drink, and done damned little heating of food, while backpacking. The Tang makes water drinkable, and mixed with the oatmeal and peanut butter, renders that stuff as "spoon-eatable" as cookie dough. I'm out there to test myself and my gear, work on fitness, etc, not to play chef in the woods.
which us why you won't hike with your gear and limit yourself to 1/2 day ftx's...

:devil:
 

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there's "survival"....and "survival plus".....I prefer the latter.Oatmeal,peanut butter,etc...those are good"bare bones" options.Although,I'd be down to "skin&bones"quickly on nothing but that...HEY DON'T FORGET THE TABASCO...mmm good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There are a few small items that make life just a bit better. Just because your out in the boonies doesn't necessarily mean a person has to be a total savage. We have learned a little bit over the millenia.

For instance, I never saw the point in being a total grunge when keeping basically clean was so simple. To this end I always have in my pack a towel, a washcloth, a collapseable wash basin, soap, toothpowder (or toothpaste) and a toothbrush.

You can make toothpowder out of 3/4 baking powder and 1/4 salt. The pioneers would used crushed charcoal. For soap, I use something scentless like Ivory and it's in a travel style soap container.

A bit of shampoo is also in order, especially for a prolonged stay. But your bar soap will do if need be. Your head hair is a natural place for nasties to take up residence. In a prolonged stay in the boonies, I'll just give myself a military buzz cut or shave my head. Easier to maintain. If you get lice, you can make a paste out of some types of plants, the SW Indians used mesquite beans, and make a mud pack on your head. It kills the lice. When you comb it out and then rinse, the dead lice will come out with it. Mesquite beans will also dye your hair black.

My wash basin is homemade but you can buy one or get a hiker's collapsable dog bowl. They weigh almost nothing and collapse flat. I'll pour in about 1/2 of the water I intent to use cold, and then I'll heat up water in my cookpot to boiling and pour that in. Then it's bath time.

I prefer not to wash my body directly out of my cooking pot if I can avoid it.

It's surprising just how much healthier you stay and better you feel out in the field when you just get clean regularly.
 

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I've had to resort to Instant coffee many time throughout the years. Personally I like ENCORE with chicory. A hot meal or beverage can mean the difference of life of death in the bush depending on your circumstances or weather conditions. By reducing the variety of food options in the bush, you do nothing but reduce your morale and allow your body to degrade by lack of nutrients. By the way gunkid, please post a kit list of the kit you have ready to go AT THIS MOMENT! You post yours, I'll post mine (with pictures also).
 

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andy said:
I've never bothered to heat a drink, and done damned little heating of food, while backpacking. The Tang makes water drinkable, and mixed with the oatmeal and peanut butter, renders that stuff as "spoon-eatable" as cookie dough. I'm out there to test myself and my gear, work on fitness, etc, not to play chef in the woods.
Aslan, I was just about to say the same thing. Here is gunboob talking BIG yet he only goes out 1/2 day. Hell, you don't need to even EAT if you are going out only 1/2 day! His oatmeal and peanut butter is something 'Spanky and the Gang' would cook up!
 

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Garand, I'm a GI coffee guy. I don't like anything except a bit of suger in it (and I can take it without if need be.)

And Mrostov, yes we are better than savages. Keeping good higine and a bit of civilization is a must.
 

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Whew!

I was worried. I thought maybe you had damaged your CD with the collected wisdom of Gunkid. Not having the instructions for the can-stored can, the assault wheelbarrow, 101 ways to kill people and steal their supplies in the first week after TSHTF, and all the other wisdom he's posted in his years on the internet would doom you to possibly survive after things fall apart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I got one of those :) It's a bit heavy for backpacking but it's good for camping with a vehicle. I keep mine in the kitchen. They are great.

Teuf, and old method was to put the roasted beans in a leather bag and crush them with a rock, then boil them. I bet the boiled whole beans are easier to strain with your teeth though :)

The old timers on the early frontier would often pack green coffee beans. You can roast them in a skillet over an open fire.

Green, unroasted coffee keeps indefinitely so long as it's not airtight and can breath, like in a burlap bag stored in a dry, preferably dark place. Green coffee does absorb the flavor of smells from the surrounding area so keep them away from the onions.

Coffee beans that have been roasted degrade significantly in quality after a month, two weeks or less for roasted ground coffee. Vacuum sealing and refrigeration can prolong this.

Interesting that during trade on the early frontier, one of the first consumables that the Indians developed a fondness for was sugar and coffee. During the Civil War, coffee was so important for moral that the Union even issued some rifles with coffee grinders in the buttstocks.
 
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