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Discussion Starter #1
I'm about to go through a sizable quantity of 7.62x51 Radway Green and am thinking about making some blaster reloads, partially for economics and more for the lolz. I've acquainted myself with the process through literature. However, I'm running into the fundamental problem of not being able to source berdan primers.

From what I gather I need 6.55mm/.2563" Large Rifle primer. Does anyone know where to get these, or have tips on berdan reloading?
 

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had a buddy go that route for a while....I believe he used magtech or pmc primers... funny looking things......:eek3: said the ignition was better performance wise...


His decapping die set him back a bit and when he broke one of the pins, had a bitchin' time getting a replacement...had to buy the whole die again...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
had a buddy go that route for a while....I believe he used magtech or pmc primers... funny looking things......:eek3: said the ignition was better performance wise...


His decapping die set him back a bit and when he broke one of the pins, had a bitchin' time getting a replacement...had to buy the whole die again...
Unfortunately, PMC Berdan primers are no longer being imported to the US (and when it was, a certain company bought a huge chunk of the final available offering up and sold it at silly high markup), and the Mag Tech that was available was primarily for shotshells from what I gather. It would also seem that primers are more difficult to import than ammunition due to their classification as an explosive (which also makes moving them more complicated if I for whatever reason wanted to order enough to actually import, then sell them).

It would seem as if the acquisition of them would be decidedly not worth their humor benefit to me.

They are essentially boxer primers without the anvil in them, and look more or less the same as if one just removed the anvil from a boxer. Not sure what was so funny looking... ?

This leads me to these two internet gems which very clearly illustrate how to recut a Berdan case (which I'd like to share, just to put them out there):

http://users.ameritech.net/mchandler/primer.html
http://collectorguns35625.yuku.com/topic/3297

However, the principle reason I'd dislike to go this route is because the reloads would be used in a semi auto and risks of their weakness would be further exacerbated. It could still be fun to do though but it adds the monetary and time costs of making tooling to efficiently execute the operation to a (now presumably handicapped) finished product which is already ~2/3 of the initial procurement cost (without considering the decapping tool).

In lieu of access to Berdan primers, it, sadly, doesn't look like it's going to happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
They are essentially boxer primers without the anvil in them, and look more or less the same as if one just removed the anvil from a boxer. Not sure what was so funny looking... ?
This just made me think of doing something hazardous and I wondered if anyone had any constructive thoughts on the matter. In Before "That's dangerous!"...

Perhaps the anvil could be removed from a Boxer primer with roughly the same explosive and vertical characteristics of a Berdan primer? I'd have to think about it and the head-end of the pocket would still need to be swagged but it does theoretically provide a cheap source of primers and reduce the work and tooling considerably, while also increasing the potential knowledge gains and enjoyment involved with the project.

I am, however, under the impression that Berdan primers have a greater volume of explosive material (which would be important considering the dynamics of the anvil) than Boxers though.

One of the biggest risks I can think of is that one would have to be meticulous about seating depth and take extreme care during the seating process...
 

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Interesting but since I don't reload, a lot of this escapes me. Are supplies for reloading becoming more scarce or is this just a more efficient way of building a primer?
 

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Graf lists the primers you want, although right now they're out of stock.

Back when I was using a lot of Berdan primers, I found the easiest way to get them was just go to a good gun shop and tell them what I wanted.

DC
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Interesting but since I don't reload, a lot of this escapes me. Are supplies for reloading becoming more scarce or is this just a more efficient way of building a primer?
For me, the project was/idea is for the lolz, mostly because I've never done it. There is theoretically more than can cause increased deviation with a Berdan, and I've never had a handload of mine fail to fire let alone because of a Boxer primer so I don't think theres a reliability gap either.

Graf lists the primers you want, although right now they're out of stock.

Back when I was using a lot of Berdan primers, I found the easiest way to get them was just go to a good gun shop and tell them what I wanted.

DC
The ones Grafs had were for 7.62x39 and 7.5 Swiss, and were of the smaller of the two "Large Rifle" Berdan classifications. They are not compatible with 7.62x51. They would have the same undersize problem as the conceptualized Boxer methods.

None of the good gunshops I give my business to stock reloading components or equipment, though I guess I may as well give it a try. Further, it is my impression that the only commercially available Berdan in the US probably sits on shelves somewhere, lost to location, with most of whats available being the size you linked me to as much of the demand seemed to come from 7.5 Swiss shooters.
 

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you used to be able to get some of the European suppliers to ship primers into the u.s. but it's been a long time since i've delt with berdan priming systems.
 
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