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lungs are just air sacks, very little fluid there to help expand a jhp. The lungs are very fragile, a Mach II hit is highly likely to scramble the entire lung. Problem is, he's got TWO lungs and he can do without both of them for a minute or more. if your hit was high on the lung, blood may fill up the lung in a few seconds, causing coughing/choking/panic. But he can fire at you 5x per second.

these sorts of considerations, and the high likelihood of poor hits or complete misses (especially beyond 5 yds) is what led Cooper to insist that students fire twice at each target. it takes longer to switch to another guy, then switch back cause the first one is not incapacited, than it does to just shoot him again while you're at it. Top hands can deliver the second hit in .11-.12 second. A reliable traverse and hit (not a practiced distance between targets, not the same horizontal plane) takes .20 second or more. guys like garand, who need .30 second for a repeat hit, and .50 second for a traverse and hit, better PRAY that they never need to get a hit in the first place.
 

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I agree on the 'shoot twice before transitioning' aspect. While you're already facing that threat, have your gun pointed at that threat, and have your finger already on the trigger, it seems silly to me to NOT put a second round in him before giving all that up to go to the next potential threat.

One guy on a lot of these boards who shoots more than I do thinks the opposite - his reasoning is "nobody gets two until everybody gets at least one". I can see the logic behind that, but still am not willing to give up all the advantages listed above; so I'm a fan of two or three quick ones if possible, before transitioning.
 
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