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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Probably most of us have done them, and those here now to talk about it didn't make a terminal mistake by doing so. So let's talk about them. Maybe a lesson to be learned by all of us.

Mine (well one of them) was definitely a learning experience. I had been loading up some .308 ammo and must have used a case that I hadn't trimmed properly. So when I seated the bullet and taper crimped it, the seater die pushed down slightly on the case and made a slight bulge just below the shoulder. Aw crap. I didn't want to pull everything apart, resize the case, trim it, then put it all back together. So I happened to have an M1A laying on the freezer (work bench #2) and figured I would just see if it would chamber, or worse comes to worse, maybe resize the round when it was jammed into the chamber by the bolt. I figured the worst that could happen would be that the round could get stuck and then I'd have to bang it out.

So I dropped the round into the chamber, pointing the barrel to the floor, pulled back the bolt and let it slam home. I thought I had died. I didn't have a clue what had happened except my ears were ringing like crazy and the entire room was filled with what I thought was smoke. Did my gun blow up and I was now "on the other side"? I was afraid to look down, thinking I would see my scattered mortal remains laying all around my ghostly feet.

A .308 going off in a 12 x 20 room will rock your eardrums, let me tell you. Plus I didn't realize how much dust was on the floor until it was floating all around the room. That was what I had thought was smoke, at first. I was just stunned and disoriented, but gradually the brain started working again and started putting the pieces of the event together. Oh yeah, it turned out that it was a damned good thing that it was an AP bullet that I had fired, otherwise it might have icocheted off of the floor and really done some damage somewhere in that building. As it was I had a small crater in that concrete floor with a nice neat drilled hole down into the ground underneath that slab. Why my legs didn't get chewed up by the copper jacket and lead core around the AP insert as it peeled back around that hole I have no idea. The hole was only about 2 feet from my left foot.

But you can bet I will NEVER do that again. Matter of fact, anytime I chamber a round in any gun I am damned cognizant of where that muzzle is pointing. That little incident really drove home to me that it is quite likely that an accidental discharge can happen in such a fashion that beforehand you will not even realize it COULD happen at all.
 

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I actually had a couple of accidental discharges on the trap range. Both times, the shotgun was pointed downrange and I hit the trap house. Just me being careless and complacent. I did drop my loaded and cocked 1911 during an AP match. It fell out of my holster because I didn't tighten up the tension knob on the holster. Gun didn't go off, good heavens, but I was DQ. I felt like an idiot. :bawling:
 
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Only one but that was more than enough. I left a loaded gun on a basement table, went upstairs and watched some TV and fell asleep. This is not something I nronmally do. Yet, as if that was not bad enough, I had an even bigger brain fart. I woke up, went downstairs to take a pee, saw the gun, picked it up and also picked up the spare magazine for it. I went upstairs, and went to unload the pistol. Well I guess I was still sleepy, and thought I had removed the mag from the mag well, after all I had the magazine in my hand. But remember the spare mag - because I forgot about it. When I removed the one in the chamber, I looked into the chamber saw it was empty, I obviously did not look down into the mag well, and I let the slide go forward. Then I pulled the trigger to decock it (this was an Ortgies no other way to decock) and bang! I must have jumped 3 feet into the air, but mostly I could not believe what I had done. My wife woke up because of it and never even checked to see if I was ok - but that is another story.

It went into the kitchen floor. When looked to see if it went through all the way (it did not as far as I could tell) I found that my natural gas line was leaking in the basement. No the bullet definitely did not hit the pipe, but the pipe was leaking at a joint and I smelled it when up near the ceiling in the basement searching for a bullet hole. It was a very slight leak so I opened a window and waited till a normal time to call the gas company. They came out and fixed it the next morning. I guess it was a coincidence that A BRAIN FART ON MY PART LED ME TO SNIFF OUT A GAS LEAK - weird but true.

I can say that I had at least followed one of the rules of safe gun handling and was pointing the pistol in a relatively safe direction when unloading it. Had I been doing that wrong too I could have shot the wife, my son, or maybe myself. It probably will happen sooner or later to all of us who handle guns enough, so it is a good thing to have gun safety rules pounded into your head now and again. That will not necesarily prevent an accidental discharge, but maybe will prevent it from being as bad as it could be.

I have been being more careful I can tell you that.

All the best,
Glenn B
 

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Good posts.

Accidents will always be a risk.


I got into the habit years ago of looking down the mag well as well as into the breach when clearing.

FWIW, I've been DQd on several competitions runs. It's not much fun, but it makes you stop and think.
 
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I look into the mag well religiously, hell even better than religiously, I do it every time I check a weapon - that is every time except that time. Like I said: I had the mag in hand, I was tired and I forgot that once. Once was all it took - man it woke me up good. Never again I can assure you of that. That was one accidental discharge due to a brain fart in about 40 years of firearms handling, but that one was way too many!
 

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:rolleyes: Well, there was the time I had a round fail to ignite in a revolver. I was good; I waited about 15 or 20 seconds with the muzzle pointed in a safe direction; and, when nothing happened, I holstered the gun to (momentarily) take care of something else. Yup, you guessed it - about 30 seconds later - BOOM! Right in the holster and straight down the outside of my leg into the concrete floor!

When I was sixteen, a hunter shooting at a peasant (?) caught me along the right side of the head with part of the shot charge. (Maybe, this explains, 'Why' I'm the way I am!) When I was in my late twenties, two young hunters with shotguns swung on a bird (pheasant, this time) and ended up pointing their shotguns straight at me. I didn't wait for, 'the jury to return' I dove, headfirst, into a mud puddle as both shot charges passed over my head; and that bird actually landed into the puddle with me!

I was soaked; the bird's wings were splashing my face; and I, suddenly, realized that one of these young men was covering me with his shotgun. They picked up the bird and walked away, laughing, while remarking to each other in Spanish (Which I speak) about watching me and keeping me covered. (This is the only time in my life that I can, ever, remember, 'praying' for buckshot - true!)

Then there was the time I caught it along the side of my ankle by another shooter who was standing next to me and had an AD. It left a crease in my skin that showed bone, but didn't stop me from walking. It did, however, ruin an otherwise perfectly good relationship.

Next, about 3 years ago, I took an old Sako out of storage and brought it to the range to sight in. I cleaned the barrel before shooting; but when I closed the bolt the rifle slam fired! (Not supposed to happen with a Sako - right!) I was really shaken up by this; fortunately I had the muzzle pointed (more or less) straight down range. What I discovered is that accumulated grease had hardened on the trigger mechanism and caused this rifle to fire when the bolt closed.

Finally, a recent incident that happened only about 18 months, ago: I was over a friend's house for dinner; and, afterwards, we retired to his basement workshop to look at some of his new guns. After going through several different, 'battle rifles' he, suddenly, pulled out a newly acquired Glock Model 19. He has arthritis in his hands; and I watched this pistol shake as he raised it towards me. When I recognized that he was going to point the muzzle at my face I leaned to the side and brought my left hand up under his arm - pushing the muzzle away from my head.

His expression, suddenly, changed to one of anger. I wrapped my hand around his wrist as he loudly proclaimed; 'What's the matter with you?' 'I never keep my guns loaded!' Now, I had the, 'gut feeling' that he was going to pull the trigger to prove his point; and, acting on instinct, I twisted the pistol out of his arthritic grasp.

He was furious; and, when I racked the slide, a 115grn. FMJ (That might have ended up in my head.) rattled across the bench top! You know what he did? He briefly looked down at the floor, slightly shook his head, and said; 'How embarrassing!' Needless to say, after almost 4 years of shooting together, we're not friends - anymore. (Never liked the way he cooked, anyway.)

I handle Glock pistols around the house all the time. Nothing has, ever, happened; but I have, now, had enough time and experience with Glocks to get to know and understand this pistol design very well. Glock makes a great combat handgun - a pure combat handgun! I'm very glad that I have the habit of not carrying with the chamber loaded - in spite of the many criticisms I've taken from other gunmen who think I'm a sissy.

OK, whatever, but I've got 51 years' experience with firearms, two gunshot wounds to brag about, and an, otherwise, impeccable personal safety record with potentially dangerous objects that I handle over and over, again, everyday of my life. Laugh at me and criticize all you want; but, unless I'm in the South Bronx at 2:00am, my Glock's chamber is going to stay empty; and I'll continue to use my two handed draw.

We should, all, remember the first three rules:

(1) THE GUN IS ALWAYS LOADED!

(2) NEVER ALLOW THE MUZZLE TO POINT AT ANYTHING YOU AREN'T WILLING TO SEE DESTROYED!

(3) NEVER PLACE YOUR FINGER ON THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOU'RE READY TO SHOOT! ;)
 

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Hey dude, glad to hear your still alive. But the people you have hung around with are a bunch of idiots that give us shooters all a bad name.

Dan
 

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:rolleyes: Well, Wheelgunner; all I can say is, If I wanted to meet anymore of these gun-totting yahoos all I have to do is start hunting, again, on state gamelands. They're there! I'm sure there are dozens more of these guys, just, waiting for someone: well-dressed, good-looking, and intelligent (like me) to come walking by. :D

Just because someone owns a gun doesn't mean that he's got the, 'smarts' to go along with the responsibility. In case you haven't noticed, yet, most people aren't, really, like fine wine; they don't tend to improve with age. Too many people seem to be more like vinegar; and for them life isn't about becoming wiser or more mellow with age; instead, it's more like, becoming, even, more rancid! (Which is, 'Why' many of us carry guns in the first place - right!)

I'll grant you that a few good men DO tend to, 'improve' with age and maturity; but, in my experience, the problem is you have to start out this way in order to make any real progress. I'm sad to say that I've got 60 years which prove that for too many people; 'This, just, ain't so!'

Sorry, hope I didn't break your balloon. ;)

Regards,


'AA'


PS: Note signature line!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hell, this is sooo true. It scares me to death to think of how many times I brushed death as a brash teenager not realizing I wasn't immortal. Heck, I even have a scar on my forehead from one of my escapades! I thought a CO2 cartridge would make a neat rocket when loaded with gunpowder....... I put fins and everything on it.:blowup01:

I think child proofing the world has been a mistake. May sound heartless, but surviving childhood is part and parcel with growing up and maturing by recognizing how dumb the things you did when you were young actually were. It takes getting hurt to learn a lesson most of the time.
 

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Arc Angel,

No bubble broken here. I have seen the idiots and have steered clear. I have been fortunate that the people I have been around were fairly responsible.

Rich Z,

I hear you about growing up and the right of passage through ones mistakes. I remember getting banged up and breaking bones on playground, was embarased more than anything. Part of life, make a mistake or bad judgement and you pay for it. Man, back then if I got hurt I knew it was my own fault.

Now a days, parents sue schools for having unsafe playgrounds when their kids get hurt, like its not the kids fault for getting hurt, heaven forbid that kids take responsibility for their own actions. They gotta learn somehow and that has been taken away.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah. I remember reading an article a while back about the number of kids who got broken necks by body surfing the waves at Ocean City, Maryland. Hell, I used to do that ALL of the time! And I can remember many a time being flung onto the beach and scraping across the sand on my chest. I also remember being held down on the bottom by an especially big wave and wondering if it was going to let me back up in time. I remember my father pulling me up once when I thought I was a goner. I couldn't get my feet underneath me.

Seemed like fun at the time. I had no idea that I was one of the lucky ones that did not wind up snapping my neck when those waves threw me for a loop against the beach. When those big waves curled over on you, not much you could do about picking where and how you were going to land.

As far as childproofing firearms (to bring this back on topic), my dad had a simple solution for that one. After he had taken me out to shoot his .22 rifle, we came back home and he turned on one of he electric burners on the stove. When it got bright red hot, he took my hand and held it a couple of inches over top of it and told me that if I EVER touched that gun without his permission, he would put my hand on that burner so I would have scars to remember what he had told me. I did not find any reason strong enough to test whether he was kidding me or not.

Nowadays I gues kids could get their parents arrested for threats like that. But I believe that children are basically wild animals until they learn social graces. And nothing works better than the threat of pain to make them pay attention. Along with one of your brothers being used as an example..... I could always run faster then my two brothers...... So by the time I had to come back home or starve, my dad had cooled down somewhat.

But you DO learn what is not socially acceptable that way, in a hurry.
 

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MY dad dint something similar to that. He got me a .22 rifle when I was 5. I was never to even look at it without him there. He told me if I did he would break the stock on my A$$ (by the look in his eyes he wasn’t kidding). Now 11 years later I keep the guns in my room. (a rule still stand that when company is over grandma got my gun safe key).

and about the accidental discharges I have only had one.


I was hunting white tail deer with a Marlin .30-.30, It was drizzling that day and my hand was wet :(

I saw A good sized doe.....I pull the gun up to my shoulder cock back the hammer and was about to shoot when the does tail flew up and a moment later she was gone. (don’t ya hate it when that happens) Well now the guns still cocked so I go to let the hammer down. I dint realize my thumb was wet, I start to ease down the hammer............................BANG.

luclaly the gun was pointed in a safe direction an nobody was hurt.
I still feel very stupid for that one



Randy
 

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i'm luck i guess,i've been around guns and shooters for over 25 yrs and never witnessed an accidental discharge. i alway try to be very careful though, always open an action in a weapon to check for my self the condition of it. always assume every gun is loaded when you pick it up. i wouldn't even think of pointing a gun even if it was partially taken down at anyone.
 
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