Arms Locker banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,151 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I had very limited contact with canines and handlers, but I will speak from one experience. We were an airmobile unit but attached for temporary duty to an ARVN (Army of the Republic of Viet Nam) division. Also attached were various support units. This included a canine attachment. I was walking past a tree where a canine handler had leashed his dog while he contacted his higher, highers, to find out what he should be doing. The dog snarled and barked at me and I was having none of this. I approached in a master/dog posture and told him to shut up and sit down, which he did. I offered my hand BELOW his muzzle for him to sniff, which he did. I sat down next to him showing no fear, (animals sense fear) and scratched his head and belly when he rolled over. I opened a can of C rations, "Beef slices, with gravy" ( more like hockey pucks in 40 weight oil) and shared it with him. (Poor dog). When I got up to leave he whined cause he was sad I was leaving. I didn't have to "string him up " and break a couple ribs with punches and kicks" The dog knew I was boss, and also knew I was his friend. Anyone who has to beat an animal to prove his superiority does not have the wires in their head connected.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,890 Posts
Terry, people who have to beat the piss out of a dog are inept as dog handlers, period.
I don't know how many times I got screamed at when my buddies an I went around to junk yards getting 4x4 and racecar parts, and I had the "Mean, killer" junkyard dog, on his back rubbing his belly. "Yer ruinin' mah dawg!" LOL

Speaking of combat dogs, I remember once they tried to see how dogs would do in airborne units. You cannot train a dog to skydive. They pissed and shit all over the guys they were riding down with, clawing them whenever they could. They didn't take to dropping to the end of the lanyard before landing. They had a bad habit of attacking the guy they rode down with when they landed.

There's some lines you just don't cross with a canine, skydiving is one of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
The sky diving hunds are fascinating. Wish there was film footage. And yep, you're right there are some things that you can't make a dog do though I think a short acting tranquilizer might have worked.

As for Terry's experience with the guard dog, they must have done things differently back then. But then I think that Terry must have a very simpatico personality that dogs can recognize as friend.

Nowadays, a guard/attack/personal protection dog is a very valuable animal and the first thing we do is poison proof them. All of my dogs will only eat from their personal bowl or from my hand. For dogs that go out in the field there are ways to snake proof them also but thats for another thread.

RIKA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,151 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
RIKA, I would never attempt to repeat my actions with today's attack/Guard dogs. The Canines at that time were more "Alert and Sniffer " dogs than "Attack" dog's. They were basically trained to "sniff" out the enemy and alert their handlers rather than attack. Unfortunately, they often were canine booby trap detonators. I DO have an affinity toward Dog's and have never, ever, been bitten. But I would never approach or attempt to feed an attack/Guard dog. Good way to lose a hand or worse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,648 Posts
reminds me of the joke:

Q: Why don't blind people skydive?

A: Scares the hell out of the dog.

Combat dogs have always been an interest. It's amazing some of the heroics they did.

:devil:
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top