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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
That blast you hear is a LOT louder than supersonic 22lr's fired thru a good .22 silencer. So it's NOT "just sonic crack". Sonic crack with the .22lr is not very loud at all. I fired quite a few rds out of a silenced 10" barreled 1022 Ruger out of Panicki's south facing door in N. Spld Illinois, a neighbor's house being 40 ft in that direction and a neighbor to the north about 60 ft away. An truly effective can for the shorty 223 either has to be 1.5"x10", or 1.750 x 7.5". THEN the only noise is out of the ejection port and the sonic crack, IF you have the right guts in the silencer. I shot a steel disk with such a silenced AR in Pagosa Springs in the winter of 2005, neighbor's homes only 50m west of me. I parked the van in front of the overhead door of the storage unit and fired towards the south, 3x. No problems arose from it. THATS adequate suppression, folks. No, it was not subsonic ammo and no, I did not hold the bolt shut.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
when you vent the rear 2.5" of the 1.250" internal tube of the 223 silencer into the "sleeve-area" between that tube and the 1. 750" sleeve-tube, which is full of multiple wraps of screenwire, a helluva lot of gas never exits the can and a lot of more gas exits quite slowly (ie, quietly). You have to use stainless steel screen right around the vent holes, cause the blast will otherwise quickly consume copper screewire in that area. I used copper screen for the next 2.5" and then aluminum screen for the front screen, to hold down weight. It works fine. I used a stake of freeze plugs as the blast-chamber, the open side towards the front of the can. I used two baffle sizes. One is about 3/4" thick (viewed from the side) and has a 3/4" ID hole thru it. The other size of baffle is 3/8" wide and has a 5/16" ID hole thru it. The two sizes of baffles alternate in the interior tube. To the front of each of the small-hole baffles, I used a 1/8" thick neopene washer, with a 5/16" hole thru it and in front of the rubber washer, I used a steel washer. Without the support of the metal washer, the blast and heat of the 223 rds would just unravel the small hole baffles. I greatly prefer the internal snapring and washer set up as a "safety valve" front end plug and aluminum tubing, .050" Wall-thickness and the aluminum rear end plug/adapter. I first tried a direct 1/2"x28 TPI thread into the aluminum end cap, but the blast/expansion would "spring" the endplug enough to jump the can forward an entire thread! :) Since that means the can is loose on the rifle, you'll get baffle strikes if you fire another shot. So I had to thread the aluminum plug for the 7/8"x14 bolt, and thread the bolt for the muzzle thread. It takes all day to make a 223 can, man. and given the "solvent traps" now available. nobody will pay what it's worth. In the same time, you can make 10 of the .22lr silencer and mount them on guns, and get $300 each.
 

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I'll buy commercial. I'd rather not risk my sight and fingers on some homemade piece of junk like you descibe.
 
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I’d venture you haven’t seen very many current .22 suppressors. They’re very quiet and superior to your wire screen design. It’s not a bad design, it’s just that technology has passed it by.

How much DB reduction are you getting? Do you know?

Kinda difficult to do an honest comparison without data. The commercial manufacturers post data, so you can make comparisons.

They can be found at most ranges these days, so you can see them in action pretty easily.
 

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.......

They can be found at most ranges these days, so you can see them in action pretty easily.
Except he can't risk going to a public or private range. He'd be tagged bagged and sent to Club Fed again.
 

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Melvin needs to get out of the box, people in survival situations have gotten by for over 100+ years without a suppressor. A suppressor is something that is handy and nice to have, but it you need one as a crutch, your lack of tactical knowledge will probably get you killed anyways.
 
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That's his problem. He seems to think that having a suppressor and coming out only at night will be the equal to a sci-fi cloaking device.

It won't between the newer NOD's and Thermals. even the lower cost(not cheapest) civilian ones are decent. He'd be toast...burnt toast.
 

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I'm still intrigued on how to create one of these Mordor-esque suppressors. I mean, an open-ended tube into which you can repeatedly inject high-pressure, high-temperature gasses over & over every time you pull the trigger, with a lot of those gasses 'never exiting the can' and apparently just piling up in there. That would be some seriously cool alchemy right there.
 

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It's because all his scenario's are imagined in his head, All the fiction survival novel's he' read are what he draws from. He's never been in combat or in a gunfight so he just imagines how they'll work out with him and his super weapons that he does not own. I've never met or even heard of a gun fancier being so afraid of noise. Silencers and ear plugs are mentioned in every scenario. I'll bet Melvin would have an extreme trigger jerk firing anything above a .22 LR.
 

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Commercial 223 cans I"ve seen used are NOT very effective.
Where did you see James Yeager recommending an SBR-length 223 with a silencer as "the way to go"..?
 

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...One is about 3/4" thick (viewed from the side) and has a 3/4" ID hole thru it. The other size of baffle is 3/8" wide and has a 5/16" ID hole thru it. The two sizes of baffles alternate in the interior tube. To the front of each of the small-hole baffles, I used a 1/8" thick neopene washer, with a 5/16" hole thru it...
Wait - for years you've claimed that a .30-caliber suppressor "won't effectively suppress" an AR because the .340" - .350" baffle holes are too big for a .223" bullet. Now you say that for your own design uses alternating 0.313" and 0.750" baffle holes and is a better design..? Again - you've said for years that a .340"-.350" hole in the baffles of a .223 suppressor is too big to suppress effectively, but you now say here that a .750" hole in every other baffle of a .223 suppressor is a good and effective design. Wow.

And fwiw, even your smaller .313 (5/16") baffle hole is bigger than necessary for a 223 if it's made well. Most suppressors use a baffle hole from 0.03"-0.05" greater than bore diameter; with 0.06" being 'loose', for applications where there are alignment worries. And you now say that you use alternating baffles that are 0.09" and 0.527" (MORE THAN HALF AN INCH) bigger than bullet diameter.

Do you ever read your own "informative gun posts"...?
 
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