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Discussion Starter #1
I know this a basic question, but can dies and reloaders from differing companies interchange, i.e. with a Dillon550b can you use RCBS .375H&H dies. Also could you use those same said dies with a Lyman single press? Picking more stuff up for the future of reloading.
 

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Yes, most dies use the standard 7/8-14 threads, so they will interchange from press to press. There are a few odd-ball dies and presses that are proprietary, but most of them are standardized now. On my Dillon 650, I use dies from RCBS, Redding, Hornaday and Dillon.
 

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I have dies from Dillon, Hornady, RCBS, and Lee on my 550B... Works great!! I really like the Hornady seating dies. They have an inner sleeve that drops down so that I don't have to think about pinching my fingers.... Done that with the RCBS dies for the 5.7X28.... I would really like something that would feed those little things automatically....
 

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Yeah, for the most part, but I wouldn't assume that dies you set up on one manufacturer's press would work properly in relation to seating depth, etc., on another manufacturer's press. Matter of fact, depending on how critical you are of tolerances, I wouldn't assume that the dies would give you the same results using a different press, but the same TYPE from the same manufacturer. Have a projectile seated a few thousands off can be a BIG deal to some shooters. Heck, for that matter, shell holders can vary as well from one manufacturer to another.
 

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I have dies from Lyman, Lee, and RCBS. I currently have a RCBS Rockchucker but used a Lee Classic single stage and an old, battered Lee Loadmaster progressive for a long time before I got the RCBS. I managed to wear out both Lee presses. The dies are interchangeable. You could well get variations from press to press but will get consistent results with a given set of dies used in a given press, regardless of manufacturer, so long as the setup is done right and done the same from loading session to loading session.

There are some dies that are not of the current 7/8-14 thread standard. These dies are very old for the most part. They were made before the thread was standardized between manufacturers. I believe that adapters are available if you just gotta' use a non-standard die set but are hard to find.

The one current exception to this is the .50 BMG dies. To the best of my knowledge, RCBS makes the only press that can handle that round. It is too tall for other presses. I am also unsure if the thread is the 7/8-14 standard. I don't shoot or load .50 BMG.

I have stop nuts on all my dies. I had to reset when I went from the Lee press to the RCBS. Now I just screw them in, lock them down, and start loading. I check the first round and then one about every 50. On powder charges, I check the first 5 and then about 1 in 20. A little variation in OAL because a bullet is a couple thousandths deeper or shallower than desired isn't that big a deal. A 3/4 powder charge or a 1 1/2 or double powder charge can easily get you hurt.
 

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Yeah, for the most part, but I wouldn't assume that dies you set up on one manufacturer's press would work properly in relation to seating depth, etc., on another manufacturer's press. Matter of fact, depending on how critical you are of tolerances, I wouldn't assume that the dies would give you the same results using a different press, but the same TYPE from the same manufacturer. Have a projectile seated a few thousands off can be a BIG deal to some shooters. Heck, for that matter, shell holders can vary as well from one manufacturer to another.
No one is saying that. Even if you have dies and hardware from the SAME manufacturer, that does not mean you can just slap it together and start loading. You have to know how to setup the resizing, seating and crimp as well as several other things. Setup is always required, regardless of manufacturer.
 

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No one is saying that. Even if you have dies and hardware from the SAME manufacturer, that does not mean you can just slap it together and start loading. You have to know how to setup the resizing, seating and crimp as well as several other things. Setup is always required, regardless of manufacturer.
Certainly, but I am pointing out what has NOT been said that a newbie might not intuitively understand. When I first started reloading and very wet behind the ears, I didn't understand a whole lot about the process. I probably still have the very first .44 magnum cartridge I ever reloaded. I seated the projectile ALL of the way into the brass case. I believe the instructions said something about adjusting the seater all the way out, and I adjusted it the exact opposite way it needed to go.. Duh.... Well it WAS all the way out....
 

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Rich, that much variation of OAL probably was a potential problem. You make very good points. The thing that most non-reloaders don't seem to understand is that reloading is very safe so long as you take however long it takes to do it right. Truthfully, we don't do anything any different than the ammo manufacturers do. We just do it by hand and therefore much more slowly than their computer controlled, whiz bang, super-gizmo machines do.
 

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Yeah, whenever someone asks me about reloading, I tell them to NEVER do it unless they can give it 100 percent of their attention. Never when you are distracted, tired, or drunk. Treat every round you create like THAT ONE is the one going to be in the chamber when you REALLY REALLY need it to work.

One reason I was never interested in progressive reloaders is because it doesn't allow this attention to detail PLUS it skips a crucial step (in my opinion) of cleaning out the primer pocket before loading in the new primer.

I've always done my reloading with a manual single stage press.
 

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I don't have the primer pocket problem because while I deprime with a press, I prime by hand. In my experience, progressive loaders give good, consistent results if you take the time to do the setup right. Even so, I still checked the powder charge on about 1 in 20 or so cases. I forgot to mention that I have never had one of those fancy presses that will feed and seat the bullets. I placed the bullets in the case mouth by hand.

The progressive is a good option when one is involved in competition defensive pistol shooting like IDPA. Loading enough ammo on a single stage press to feed that addiction with practice and competition is a daunting task at best. I tried and failed miserably. A progressive doesn't do too bad with .223 loads for volume shooting either. For pinpoint accuracy in any round, single stage is the way to go. Then again, pinpoint accuracy shooters aren't likely to burn up 300 to 500 rounds a week.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
To be honest, the Dill 550b was going to be for those mega mover rounds, 38special & .45 acp. While the monsters like the 375H&H/.50 Beo, are single stagers. Once I get comfortable with the process of reloading.
 

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I should make one exception to my last post. Exhibition shooters do shoot for pinpoint accuracy or better on occasion. They also practice a whole lot to keep proficient. Then again, theirs is often trick shooting that might get you asked to leave the local range under normal circumstances.
 
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