Arms Locker banner

21 - 27 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,826 Posts
I'm still wondering what oil to use. I have heard "dirty" motor oil, but I"m not going to do that - not to a high-gloss prepped gun. I have also heard that tranny fluid works. Dunno.
Motor oil Vs. Tranny Fluid ... .Difference in results who knows? I used tranny fluid the last i tried. I used a 1861 Colt Navy "clone" and removed Italian proofs and "black powder only" markings. My barrel came out a plumbish color.If you look at it in the light you can see how purple it looks. I settled for that and was happy with the results. Its all in the prep work and cleaning and making sure nothing is contaminted if you want good results.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
Interesting stuff, GM. I'm wondering if the color - the purplish color you mentioned - was a result of the color of the oil. I'm still studying, and I have not yet found anything definitive that says whether the final color of the steel is imparted by the color to which it was heated, or the color or other properties of the quenching oil, or a little of both. I suspect it is the last. I know that with some of the old fire bluing methods, it was the heat of the steel to the blue color that gave it it's final color.

Interesting stuff!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,826 Posts
Another thing jon is when you "boil clean parts" , make sure the parts are suspended one inch from bottom with iron stove pipe wire in the cleaning solution. Otherwise , "hot spots" and blotchy bluing will result.Are you using a cast iron pot for boil? Stainless steel? After boil you should rinse with clean "soft Water" / "Rain Water" or distilled water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,826 Posts
Interesting stuff, GM. I'm wondering if the color - the purplish color you mentioned - was a result of the color of the oil. I'm still studying, and I have not yet found anything definitive that says whether the final color of the steel is imparted by the color to which it was heated, or the color or other properties of the quenching oil, or a little of both. I suspect it is the last. I know that with some of the old fire bluing methods, it was the heat of the steel to the blue color that gave it it's final color.
I think alot of it had to do with metal quality..What once looked good on a six iron probably taken on a different look as metallurgy progressed with steel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
Right you are on the boiling. I'm using an old iron gumbo pot, and I suspend the parts / frame, etc. from a shiskebob skewer laid over the top of the pot, with rebar-tie wire (just plain, uncoated iron wire) hangers. I'm using whatever that funky water I get is - the "reverse osmosis" water? Can't remember what it says on the label.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,826 Posts
This was left over tranny fluid from when I did my blue job. Lower right corner..I had that thing half full and a bitch to clean.... .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
Well, my gosh, Gunners! Is that an old Remington Model 11 shotgun in your photo? I ask because I have one (a 12 gauge) that has exactly the color wood as the gun in the photo. And I'll tell ya - it is a hard-kickin' SOB, that one is! First you hear the bang. Then you feel the shockwave through your jaw. Then you hear the dying vibrations of the main spring. Whew!
 
21 - 27 of 27 Posts
Top