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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen and read dozens of fire making techniques from flint and steel to bow drills to rubbing two thoughts together. Now I've been known to wander the woods of Wisconsin through all the seasons and I always carry a fire starting device "just in case." I'm pretty careful, but a twisted ankle or other injury could happen. Cell phones can be tricky and I have a "dead zone" not more than a mile from my home. No one knows why. Anyway the device is called a Bic lighter. I carry one in my pocket always. What if it get's wet? It gets wet all the time and dries out in minutes. I carried my latest one for over a year and it's gotten soaked I don't know how many times and I just flicked it a moment ago and it lit fine. Flint and steel? I leave it to Jerimiah Johnson. Flick a Bic and I have fire.
 
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something useful and very easy to make is char cloth.

you can put a bit of cotton cloth in an altoid tin and place it on your bar-b-que. cook it on high. let it cool and you should find a carbonized bit of cloth inside the tin. This stuff lights on fire very easily and makes excellent tinder.

there's plenty of videos out there if you google char cloth.
 

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Many people wander through the bush, few are apparently prepared for it. Watching the Discovery channel show "North Woods Law", I am amazed at the rescues that are done by the wildlife officers, the vast majority of "hikers" are not prepared for anything past a burrito fart. Back when I hunted on a regular basis I always had enough gear in my daypack to keep me alive for at least 36 hours in case I ended up hurt or whatever.
 
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Many people wander through the bush, few are apparently prepared for it. Watching the Discovery channel show "North Woods Law", I am amazed at the rescues that are done by the wildlife officers, the vast majority of "hikers" are not prepared for anything past a burrito fart. Back when I hunted on a regular basis I always had enough gear in my daypack to keep me alive for at least 36 hours in case I ended up hurt or whatever.
I used to teach a course called "I'm lost, now what?"

90% of the people have no idea how quickly things can go wrong, how easy it its to get lost without a compass, map, and/or a GPS. and how easy it is for batteries to die in a GPS.

Basic land nav skills aren't taught very much any more. I wish Orienteering would pick up again.

then people need to learn basic stuff to keep in a daypack, staying hydrated, etc.

you'd be surprised how many people die in the desert with half full canteens because they're trying to ration their water supply.

I sum up the desert like this: everything in the desert wants to kill you. It wants to sting you, bite you, stab you, burn you, and dehydrate you. Plan accordingly.
 

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I tend to use a gps like this:

I turn it on and mark my camp. then I turn it off. all my other navigation is map and compass. If I need, I can turn on my GPS and verify my location, or navigate back to camp in the dark. Even though I keep a spare set of batteries for my GPS, I've never needed them.

I also mark when I take a shot at game, or where the carcass is if I have to make more than one trip hauling meat out.

The GPS is a backup to the compass, not the other way around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Map reading and use of a compass are lost arts. My Son and I travel to a large North Ontario Lake for fishing every year. You can get lost in a heartbeat as all the shoreline looks the same. We use GPS's of course, nut two map's and two compass's come along also. Two years ago under an overcast sky neither GPS would pick up a signal. We took turns navigating with map and compass. It took a bit longer and we did miscalculate on distances, but we found our way back to camp. No one who is going in a real woods or on a large body of water should not be able to use a compass and map.
 
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of course. I carry a lighter, there's another 'peanut" lighter and a matchcase in the BOB. there's a ferrorod on my keychain and a freznel lense in my wallet. Why not? neither one is any sort of a burden. But a lighter is not an option for the alone show (altho it WAS on the list, for one season) and I'd not waste one of my 10 gear picks on one. Just have rust on the ferrule and the back of the Cold Steel shovel. That makes it easy to 'fire roll" a 28" strip of the shemagh. If a bit of your 1000 ft of 20 ga "snare wire' is copper electrical wire, you can use the battery of the head lamp , the duct tape and a bit of lint, scraped off of the shemaugh, to start a fire. Bed your coals and you wont need to start any more from scratch. It's stupid to waste a pick on a ferrord and then not have something as useful as a 3 lb block of sea-salt or the duct-tape. It's silly to waste picks on the sleeping bag, cookpot, axe,saw, belt knife, gillnet, paracord, or the bow, too.
 

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and Melvin learned all of this on 1/2 day field exercises!
 

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Map reading and use of a compass are lost arts. My Son and I travel to a large North Ontario Lake for fishing every year. You can get lost in a heartbeat as all the shoreline looks the same. We use GPS's of course, nut two map's and two compass's come along also. Two years ago under an overcast sky neither GPS would pick up a signal. We took turns navigating with map and compass. It took a bit longer and we did miscalculate on distances, but we found our way back to camp. No one who is going in a real woods or on a large body of water should not be able to use a compass and map.
Terry, this is the problem with technology, it breaks or fails.

Technology is awesome when it works, but reliance on it is a problem...
 

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Like most with narcissistic tendencies he's got fantasies of being on the show and one upping everyone there.

Not sure why he doesn't apply unless his background excludes him?

Gaming it from the sidelines dose not impress me.

One similar show that's not a true contest I watched in the past was Dual Survival. At least the repeats. Yeah it had "drama" but at least had decent field demos of techniques in different environments and two different perspectives on it.
 

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Like most with narcissistic tendencies he's got fantasies of being on the show and one upping everyone there.

Not sure why he doesn't apply unless his background excludes him?

Gaming it from the sidelines dose not impress me.

One similar show that's not a true contest I watched in the past was Dual Survival. At least the repeats. Yeah it had "drama" but at least had decent field demos of techniques in different environments and two different perspectives on it.
I have a theory, but I'm not going to say anything. I think I've had fun at his expense enough for a while. Besides, I have a range day tomorrow, and then Friday I leave for my final weekend of scouting for Coues deer along the Mexican border.
 

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Me I'll be alternating between more reloading, cutting brush back for well better fields of fire and if we get more rain burning brush.
 

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I used to watch Survivorman with Les Stroud, but could never get into Bear Grylls, Survivor, or any of the other similar shows. The little bit I saw of any of them didn't bear any resemblance to anything I've encountered in the woods, on the farm, or in the military. They seemed to just be soap operas set in the woods.

Never seen Alone; can't comment on it specifically.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Notice how Melvin the Wonder Boy sidestepped the Map and Compass discussion. He admitted he can't use either. Now what even fledgling outdoorsman can't use the basics of map reading? They teach it in Basic Training and you have to pass Land Navigation. He give advice on the Alone show but can't read a map? OK
 
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...the Map and Compass discussion. He admitted he can't use either.
Seriously? That's freshman-level stuff; as you say even in generic Basic you have to learn that, and if you've spent any time in the woods or wild beyond that, you should certainly be much better than Basic Training level.
 
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Notice how Melvin the Wonder Boy sidestepped the Map and Compass discussion. He admitted he can't use either. Now what even fledgling outdoorsman can't use the basics of map reading? They teach it in Basic Training and you have to pass Land Navigation. He give advice on the Alone show but can't read a map? OK
He admitted over a decade ago that he didn't know how to use a map or compass. He mentioned that the Army didn't teach him anything when he went to puppy beating class.
 

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I've learned lots of things in 10 minutes that you couldnt learn if you studied them for 10 days. That's just how it is. NOt a single native american or Innuit had a map or a compass. What idiot has not personally learned his chosen area? I'm not out there to travel in straight lines, or meet anyone or get to any given place in any set time period. I know how to get there the same way the indians did. your gps, map and compass wont show you where enemies are in the way. and that's what matters. Basic was 50 years ago and thy didn't teach it. They taught it in AIT, but we didn't get to practice it and I've never had any need of it. Nobody's dropping me in any place by chopper I remember how I got there and I nearly always go back the same way. I aint dumb enough to live where I have to go more than 10 miles to a suitable BOL. You city slickers have that problem. i do not.
 

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I've learned lots of things in 10 minutes that you couldnt learn if you studied them for 10 days. That's just how it is. NOt a single native american or Innuit had a map or a compass. What idiot has not personally learned his chosen area? I'm not out there to travel in straight lines, or meet anyone or get to any given place in any set time period. I know how to get there the same way the indians did. your gps, map and compass wont show you where enemies are in the way. and that's what matters. Basic was 50 years ago and thy didn't teach it. They taught it in AIT, but we didn't get to practice it and I've never had any need of it. Nobody's dropping me in any place by chopper I remember how I got there and I nearly always go back the same way. I aint dumb enough to live where I have to go more than 10 miles to a suitable BOL. You city slickers have that problem. i do not.
What does a map and compass or GPS have to do with traveling in a straight line? That’s idiotic thinking, and shows a complete lack of knowledge or understanding.

Explain what they have to do with straight lines - this should be interesting.

Lack of map and compass skills is the mark of a city slicker. Any outdoorsman worth his salt can at least read a map.

What happens if you can’t go out the way you came in? What if you have to leave an area via a way you’ve never been before?

What if your bug out location 10 miles away is destroyed, occupied, or inaccessible?

For some one claiming to be a survival expert, you seem to lack a couple of skills. Basic land navigation is something everyone should have if they’re going in the wild.
 
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