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Quotes I found interesting:


From the first link -

…The frame breakage occurred after the second round was fired…

That’s why you break in any mechanical device. I’ve had an actual-Colt-brand 1911 break on the third shot; in the same place this glock did, actually. A new officers’ model, back in 1984 or so. Plunger broke on the third shot, broke in the same place on the second magazine (after I replace the broken part the first time), and had the front sight fly off in between those two breaks.

Doesn’t mean “1911’s are a bad idea”; it means I got a bad one. It happens sometimes. But when it happens with a glock, it’s deemed newsworthy.



From the second -

…”KB’s do of course occur in other guns, but no one appears to be keeping accurate statistics…”

Well, there we have it. Since we don’t have any statistics to back anything up; we must blame glock. Hard to argue with that logic. I’ve only seen two KB’s personally; first was with a .38 super 1911 in 1989 or ’90. Blew the top three or four rounds in the magazine, and blew the magazine out of the gun. Also blew grip particles into the shooter’s hand; it was impressive to see how fast a man can drop something that just blew up in his hand.

Even so, that obviously shouldn’t be taken as a broad incrimination of 1911’s or even 38 super 1911’s. It was a fluke; almost certainly a bad (improperly sized) handload.

Second was a Ruger Blackhawk in .357 magnum. HEAVY silhouette loads, that the shooter had left setting in a dark-colored, steel ammo can in the Houston sun for hours. Touched one off and literally blew the top strap off the gun. That doesn’t mean a Blackhawk is an unsafe gun by any means.



From the third –

”…American Ammunition brand, especially the 230-grain RNL has been associated with an alarmingly high number of KB events….”

And the phenomenon is still seen automatically by some as a “glock weakness”…


Regarding the “firing out of battery” issue, a properly-sized round is less likely to do that in a glock than in almost any other gun, due to the glock’s slightly-oversize chamber. Only guns I’ve ever had fire out of battery were a 10-22 and my Ciener unit; both when dirty and shooting crap ammo.
 

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I disagree. Glock's are occupying the same position that S&W did in the '60's. They have a large corner of the Law Enforcement market. The number of Glock's in use is huge. Sure, there HAVE been catastrophic failures, but I would love to know the percentage. It must be infintesimal. And how many of that minute number of KB's are not ammunition related? The State Police and a huge number of small municipalities did a "group" buy of Glock 21's many years ago. A lot of pistols. Not one reported KB. I did a long study of the Glock before switching from my Colt Series 70 for duty carry. I didn't like the plastic guns either, but if a tool is more efficient, and I believe the Glock is, why not use it? I think the M-1 Garand is a great weapon, but I would drop it in a hot minute for an M-14. The world moves on. I had an extractor from a Colt .45 strike me in the chest while standing behind a firing line. The gun just flew to pieces. The shooter swore he was using factory ammunition. I also saw a S&W .357 Model 66 come apart using "light" handloads. Sure. A failure of this type is possible with any firearm. The ammunition is almost alway's at fault. This Glock "KB" thing is in my opinion, being blown way out of proportion by the "tupperware gun" hater's. I am not a Glock fanatic. It's boxy looking, and that plastic look is uappealing. My Colt is much prettier. But I don't carry a combat gun for pretty. I carry one that I have the most confidence in. End of sermon.
 

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Just a plain fact that some pistols and rifles for that matter can be "Lemons" from the factory. I have owned some Glocks in the past and never had a problem besides a "Stovepipe" every now and again. I have had some colts break extractors and a ruger that just was a POS from the moment I loaded it. I still don't see what the big deal is with glock though. Granted they are light but so are S&W airlites. They shoot ok in my opinion, but then again I never had a glock set up for competition shoots either. The only thing I liked about them is when I sold them they seemed to hold a good re-sale value.
 

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i would love to own a glock#31 in .357 sig!
i just have not 'justified' it yet!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This wasn't posted as a slam against glocks. ITs a safety concern. Evidently, from what I have read about it, there is a factory problem w/ disconnectors.

If I owned one, I would check it out. Maybe trying to fire it out of battery w/ a primed only case in the chamber.

Just my .02
 

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Hmmmm.....pic in first link shows dust cover bent down but no other damage.
If gun failed badly in front of slide the recoil spring and guide would likely not be in place. Serial# tag is bent down at a sharp angle as if the force came down from very front of frame.
Very odd looks to me that some idiot tried to use a M4 type verticle grip on the light mount rail and bent the dust cover down while firing it in a tight grip.
 

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Terry, I'm interested in that fault with the S&W M66. I've shot mine with over 25,000 plus .38 +P in IPSC competition and I only broke 2 firing pins. Any info would be appreciated.
 

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Mabu Khan said:
Hmmmm.....pic in first link shows dust cover bent down but no other damage.
If gun failed badly in front of slide the recoil spring and guide would likely not be in place. Serial# tag is bent down at a sharp angle as if the force came down from very front of frame.
Very odd looks to me that some idiot tried to use a M4 type verticle grip on the light mount rail and bent the dust cover down while firing it in a tight grip.

Interesting thought, and you're right about the SN plate. That bend demonstrates stress coming either from above the dustcover, or in front of the SN plate, at the dustcover.

If the stress is supposedly the result of 'firing out of battery' the origin would have been above the trigger guard, well behind both the dustcover and SN plate. So how is stress at the front of the dustcover explained...? A vertical foregrip explains it better than anything I can come up with.

Good catch, oh apocolyptic one... :cool:
 
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