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Discussion Starter #1
bookwriter

Hey!
As the name says, I'm (trying) to write a book, and I need info. I have already typed up a new thread, but when I tried to submit it it turned out cookies were disabled on my machine!
I really don't know much about personell weapons, so some of there questions are going to sound really stupid, but please try to answer them to the best of your ability.

What is the average speed of the bullet when it comes out of the barrel of a nine mm in mtrs/sec?

How much would this speed be decreased if the gun came from the mid sixties? (Ageing is not a factor here so pretend that you are measuring the speed at the time of manufacture.)

Is there such a thing as a fully- automatic handgun?

If so, would it be possible to have a selector switch to determine if you wanted semi-automatic and full?

What is the weight of an average 9 mm handgun?

What does the 12. mean when refering to shotguns? (I would be to embarrased to go to the shotgun forum and ask that question)

Is three round burst possibe in a handgun? If so, are computer chips needed?

How many rounds are in the average clip?

If I wanted to eject a clip, what would I do? If there is a button, where is it located?

Is black-anodization (spelt wrong, probably) possible on a gun?

You hear about nine milimetre handguns all the time, but (stupidest question yet) are there others?

If so, is it the higher the milimeterage, the more fire power the gun has?

When refering to calibare, it means, like, the nine in 9 mm, right? How would you use the word in a sentance?

What is the little (big, in most cases) hole that the bullet comes out of called?


Thanks if you answered a question. You're a loser if you knew the answer and didn't bother to reply. Ta, Tom

ps: You'll probably be seeing more obvious questions in the handgun forum in the months to come.
 

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bookwriter,

9mm muzzle velocity = 366 m/s

Same speed if the gun came from the mid-sixties, other variables are more important.

Yes, there are a few fully automatic handguns, but not many. The Glock 18 is the most recent. Fully automatic handguns jump around too much during firing. The first couple of shots head toward the target and the rest go into the ceiling or tree tops.

All fully automatic handguns from manufacturers have had a selector switch.

Until the 1960's the average 9mm handgun weighed about one kilogram. In the 1960's, aluminum frames came into use on some new models and their weight was 3/4 of a kilogram. In the 1980's, the Glocks were introduced and due to their synthetic frames they weigh typically 2/3 of a kilogram.

The "12" with shotguns refers to the inside diameter of the barrel. Specifically, it means "12 gauge". The name comes from the fact that 12 lead balls of that same diameter would weigh a pound, hence a 20 ga. is smaller in diameter. Twelve gauge is about 18.5 mm.

Three round burst limiters are used on some fully automatic handguns such as the Beretta 92R. Traditionally, no computer chips are used, it's done mechanically using a cam and ratchet.

The average 9mm clip depends on the pistol's layout. There are two types, single stack and double stack. Single stack clips hold all of the cartriges in a single column. Double stack clips hold the cartridges in two, side-by-side columns. Single stack clips usually hold eight or nine, while double stack clips usually hold 15. Obviously, double stack clips hold more, but they require a thicker grip and therefore are less concealable.

To eject the clip, you will usually push a button on the left side, below and behind the trigger. Some European pistols, such as the Walther P-38, use a small catch on the underside of the grip.

Most military guns are Parkerized or anodized to be a black or dark gray color.

The "9mm" is the diameter of the bullet on a 9mm pistol. It doesn't tell us any thing more.

Caliber, or calibre, is the term refering to the diameter of the bullet. For example you might say,"The .38 caliber pistol had been fired three times."

The hole where the bullet comes out is called the muzzle.

I am happy to answer questions!
 

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there are several choices for full auto or burst firing pistols that would have been availible in the sixties. The Mauser Model of 1896, known as the C96, was produced in .30 and 9mm calibers.
.30 caliber is 3/10th's of an inch in diameter while the 9mm is actully a little larger being .355 inches in diameter. It was made in full auto bersions in the 1920's and early 1930's. Some were used in WWII by the Nazis. Some Colt Model 1911's were modified to fire bursts or be fully automatic during the same time period. The 1911 was the pistol issued to US servicemen in .45 caliber. The Russian produce Stechkin is a 9mm pistol that fires full auto and was developed in the early 60's, it also took a wire stock that was detachable and was used during the infamous 1984 coupe de etat of the Afgani goverment by Spetnaz commandoes. The British modified the Browning GP35 9mm pistol of 1935 during WWII to fire full auto and issued small numbers to clandestine operatives. this pistol is famous for being the first to ever use a high capacity magazine and held 13 cartridges when 7 or 8 was the norm.I hope this helps, if you have questions please ask.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for that! It'll help a lot in being able to explain things more clearly, but now I'm going to hae to go back and change heaps of stuff! But its all for the better, I suppose.
That Stechkin is perfect for the KGB cold war assassin.
Thanks jamullins and GBullet!!!
 

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The Stechkin was chambered for a slightly different 9mm cartridge than the 9mm NATO. It's cartridge is known as the 9x18mm or 9mm Makarov. The muzzle velocity is 340 m/s and its bullet weighs 4/5 of the 9mm NATO bullet weight.

jamullins made a good suggestion with the Stetchkin as it was used by some Soviet security agencies. The drawback of the pistol was its size, 225mm long, and its lack of control on auto due to its light weight, about one kilogram loaded. It holds 20 rounds and fires at a rate of 750 rounds per minute on automatic.

Soviet agents of the post WWII-1968 era were known to have used Walther PP's and PPK's from various sources, and small Czech CZ pistols. CZ .32ACP pistols were recovered from Soviet personel during the U.S. invasion of Grenada.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks again. Would it be to hard to hold the handgun down when firing full auto so that all the bullets go to where you want them to go? I know you would need a lot of muscle power and/or adrenalin, but it would still be pretty hard, I guess. A friend of mine used too be in the army, and every one reconed that is was impossible to hold one of them high-powered rifles down (name ends with 5 or 6) with one arm, but on the range he saw a guy do it, and it was all sheer muscle power. Just wondering . . .
 

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it takes a lot of practice to use a full auto weapon well and even more experience to use on well in combat. The KGB assassins of the cold war were notorious for using poison delivered by serynge. They did this so much it led people to believe that they were actually blowing air into arteries going t othe brain. They developed several pens that held a subsonic .30 caliber bullet that fired rather quietly and was capable of penetrating 5mm's of mild steel armor at 3 meters. what constitutes mild steel armor is questionable as they never clearly defined it. the pens were used on occassion in assassinations in south america, africa, and china that have ever been reported. it seems the technique ws to get in position to actually be able to touch the target in an inobvious way and shoot him in the heart or head. the KGB also made use of terrorists to hit targets for them. they tended to stay away from knives, garrotes, unarmed techniques, and so on becuase they didnt want their agents to consider using techniques that were to "unsure" in their unintended consequences.
 

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The various Warsaw Pact spy/secret police agencies also developed ordinary looking devices that could inject or fire poison. One of the better known examples was an "umbrela" that fired a 0.5mm steel ball with two pits containing ricin.

Trotsky was murdered in Mexico City by a Soviet agent with a rock hammer.

Usually with automatic weapons, it's not the muscle but the fact that the recoil is a fast pulse. I hold the forearm of an automatic weapon with a lighter grip than normal. I literally let it sit on top of my left palm. With my right hand, I hold a "handshake" grip and fire short bursts.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Me again. More Q's

Okay, I have just shot four bullets from a double stack
clip, which containes fifteen rounds, so there 11 left. In full auto, how long would it take me to fire the rest? (the more numbers the better)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
oh yeah, and say I just pulled a handgun from a hip holster (thats what they call them, right; or was that in the Wild West?)
that I had never fired before, or properly looked at, for that matter. What would be the first thing I would do i.e. check weight, check how much weight the trigger takes before it fires; and what checks do you preform before you fire a handgun?
 

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You know, this is real encouraging to see an author trying to get all of the facts right on a gun scene before writing about it. I don't know how many times I have read something like "Rock Stonejaw, as quietly as possible, drew his trusty Smith & Wesson revolver from his vest holster, clicked off the safety silently, and prayed he would go unnoticed by the sentries." Turns me right off!

Oh, and bookwriter, in case you don't know what it is about that statetment that makes my eyebrows frizzle, it's that a revolver does not have a safety. :laugh:

Are you going to have any snakes in your book? In my other life, I breed snakes for a living.....
 

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bookwriter,

I'll bet it is getting harder to find gun related info in Australia! How have your country's gun laws affected the common man's opinion on firearms? Please don't think I'm picking on you guys, I really am curious.

Rich,

With all your postings about Pythons recently, I'm wondering if I need to find a new corn supplier. ;)
 

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Don't know if you heard or not, but the Evil Empire fell with the Berlin wall in 1989. Welcome to the 21st Century! :wavey:

Can't say that I see anything wrong with someone seeking knowledge. ;)
 

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You can't go and edit your post three times and expect anyone to reply to you...

I've just read at least 7 of Tom C's book and surpriseingly he really knows his stuff. Yes he is a retired insurance salesman, but he is one of the most acurate authors on the market...

this guy is just playing with you...
 

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Not mad at all

I was just giving you a hard time about the KGB comment. ;)

You may be right, but I have to give him the benefit of the doubt. After all, his govt doesn't think a common man should own a gun. Besides, some of the things he is asking about is actually kind of interesting......

Where are you at in Houston? I'm an Austin (for the third time). CHL?

Glad you found the site!
 

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You can't go and edit your post three times and expect anyone to reply to you...
Not doing it on purpose. The weather here is causing network problems and I keep getting kicked off. Sorry for the confusion.
 

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improbable draw

Your premise here is basically improbable. A person is very unlikely to have a holster for a gun with which they are unfamiliar. If this is a person with any training or familiarity with fire arms, they will have a basic idea of the performance of most guns.
The check you perform on an unfamiliar gun would depend a lot on the situation. If you've scavanged a weapon under fire you would only check to see if it was loaded.
If you had leasure, you would make sure it was unloaded, check the magazine drop to see if it would fall freely or if it needed to be pulled, feel the trigger, and test fire it for accuracy and reliability.
 
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