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med kit =vasoline, moleskin, 2 ace bandages, liquid bandage, iodine, injectable anti-diahrettic, serious sedatives, stimulants, painkillers, about 1/2 oz total. About 3 ozs of antibiotics. Syringe, sutures, a bit of gauze, tweezers, mirror. There's other stuff that can serve medical needs, like the water filter (sterile flushing of wounds) cookpot (same thing, sterilize tools) SOG mulitool (holds sutures, ) straight razor(shave around wounds, debridement) cord, wire, tape, bandana(binding wounds or injuries) candle, soap, bug dope, bug netting (keeping insects off of wounds)
You think that is a good personal med kit. Well, as I see it, that figures for you especially since you have vasoline at the very top of the list. If you are wounded you can take your kit and jerk off while someone with a real first aid works on you. As to a syringe, with what size needles? As to sutures, of exactly what type are you speaking. The wrong type are worthless if you take them for first aide. And since you always talk SHTF scenarios what do you think of some Atropine with the necessary kit to inject it?

As to water filters they are not part of a medical kit. They would be a survival tool kit component but not a med kit. Using the filtered water would be much better than using boiled water for any cleansing of wounds. Aren't you the guy always writing about unecesasary risks in SHTF scenarios - like just recently didn't you write about too much movement caused by swinging an axe - and now you want to start a fire to boil water! Use a type 1 level filter which eliminates 99.9 percent of bacteria, viruses, parasites and also removes many pollutants (something boliing may or may not do, and boiling may enhance some bad properties of some pollutants).


Now as to a cook pot, are you kidding! If you absolutely need to boil water for survival purposes of any type, then this is why you should carry a metal canteen not a cook pot in your SHTF personal gear. A cook pot is a waste of valuable space and of carry capacity for the bearer of the load even if a small aluminum one. It is useless. Eat cold meals to survive, keep fires to the absolute bare minimum. Use the canteen to melt ice or snow - yes you have to pack it in a small openning, so what.

Would it be so bad to carry a small sterile eye wash container? Of course having some sterile eyewash solution in the kit would be a handy thing to use to wash out an eye OR to wash a wound also. It would also avoid wasting all the time you would take to boil water or filter water, that is once you found a water source. I sure thought we were talking first aid here in a SHTF scenario, and I don't want to be waiting for you to fetch the water Gunga Ding, let alone boil it.

Now I will admit that those ace bandages are invaluable part of any first aide kit. They are great for certain types of injuries such as sprains, breaks, gun shots & stab wounds (hold other bandages in place well while applying pressure to wound), reportedly for certain types of snake bite (but you had better know which types because if ou use this on a bite from a viper or pit-viper too bad for you). They have many other uses.

Now as opposed to bug netting, more gauze would be recommended in my kit. It will do a wonderful job of keeping a wound free of insects if you wrapped it properly.

Bug repellant in the med kit is also a bad idea. It should be brought along if you can bring it but not in the med kit. If it leaks it can screw up things badly by contamination or corrosion. Yes have you ever seen what 99% Deet does to paint and many plastics.

I wonder did you forget temporary fillings and caps. Very small items but invaluable when you have a bad tooth.

As to iodine, what type, I hope you mean Provodine Iodine or do you mean tincture of iodine?

Serious sedatives and stimulants have no place in a first aid kit although they may be in a medics kit. Pain killers are ok though as are antibiotics. Which would you recommend for longest shelf life under SHTF conditions and as far as having the broadest spectrum of treatment.

Cord or wire absolutely unnecessary in a first aid kit. You want cord then use a roll of dental floss, many great survival capabilities.

Bandana for dressing wounds - yeah you do yourself with a bandana. A sterile triangular bandage would be better in the kit.

What about small scissors - they are found in most small first aid kits I have ever seen.

Amonia inhalents, also a good deal, along with amonia swabs for bug stings.

My goodness what about antihistamines.

As to the runs, maybe you could use a hot beef injection to stop them, but for most people lomotil would be a good choice. I on the other hand would also want something milder than that along the lines of a chewable Kaopectate - if only because this will not completely plug you up like lomotil. This is prefferred in certain cases of food poisoning because you want to pass some of that crap out of you rather than retain it. Take both, and judge which to use.

Soap and a candle, I wonder if you could combine them somehow with the vaseline and have a party with yourself. Candles are not needed in a first aid kit, but may be a good idea for a survival kit. Soap is ok if antibacterial stuff, and I mean the stuff used in hospitals not the crap you usually get at the supermarket.

Of course much of this might go into a Medical Kit carried by a medic, the rest in your survival kit but not a fiorst aid kit. Most other people would only require and only have room for a first aide kit with all their other gear - and wasn't that what was being asked about - a personal first aid kit - yes it was what was asked about in the paragraph asking about first aid stuff - not a medics kit?

:)
 

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Are you sure that its not his whole survival kit?
 

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stupid <font color=red>*</font><font color=red>*</font><font color=red>*</font><font color=red>*</font>. U use whatever needles go with whatever suturing you KNOW how to do, the worst kind. You use the liquid bandage for small stuff. Go ahead,dumbass, TRY carrying the kitchen SINK. You are just as stupid about EVERYTHING else as you are about the med stuff. PREVENTION is the key. Fitness, and protecting self from GETTING sick or injured is the thing, dumbass. shtf, once you get hurt or sick, you are PROBABLY as good as dead, so why bother lugging along lots of crap that you will probably never survive having to use?
 

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In other words melvin, you have no clue to even the barest minimum types of first aid you may need.You show your ignorance, nay your sheer stupidity with every post.Vaseline at the top of your list in case bubba joins ya??????
Sutures,..I carry several kinds, like 3-0,and 4-0 silk,pre threaded on a 19mm ps-2 sutting needle, along with 4-0 vicryl on the same type of needle.Have several others including dissolving sutures for deep suturing.I also carry a couple skin staplers, they're faster than sutures, easier to do one handed if need be, and were easy to learn how to use.

Thats just a couple items one should know how to use, along with what anti-s are best for certain types of infection, yes certain ones work better than others for different things melvin.

Gleen nailed you on this thread, but like I said your an ignorant sob and your every post shows that 99 percent of what you say is bs.I'll give you the 2 percent since even a blind squirrel finds a nut every now and then.
 

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You appear to be very dependant on drugs and needles. Its probably due to your background. Handled incorrectly, it is a weakness that can get you killed.
 

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Thats a well thought out kit Glenn.

I prefer a pot though for cooking and other task, such as making glue and collecting water, cooking foraged plant food, grains ect. It would be tough to steam thistle shoots in a metal canteen and melting snow would be a royal pain too. Also boiling is probually the best way to cook most foraged meat, so you would have to cut that squirrel into pretty small peices to get him in your "cook pot" LOL

I don't think a cook pot really takes up all that much space in the pack since you can store stuff inside it, mybe stuff you don't want mashed ect.

Teuf,
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
andy said:
stupid <font color=red>*</font><font color=red>*</font><font color=red>*</font><font color=red>*</font>. U use whatever needles go with whatever suturing you KNOW how to do, the worst kind. You use the liquid bandage for small stuff. Go ahead,dumbass, TRY carrying the kitchen SINK. You are just as stupid about EVERYTHING else as you are about the med stuff. PREVENTION is the key. Fitness, and protecting self from GETTING sick or injured is the thing, dumbass. shtf, once you get hurt or sick, you are PROBABLY as good as dead, so why bother lugging along lots of crap that you will probably never survive having to use?
WHY BOTHER CARRYING ALL OF WHAT CRAP - the crap you mentioned that you would include in the kit you would carry. Is that the crap we should not bother with, the crap you suggested? Ho, ho, ho, heee, heee, heee or as ralph Kramden would say: Har, Har Har Har Hardy Har Har! You are, in my opinion, an imbecile! All of this crap from the guy who wanted to carry a cooking pot to boil water to clean a wound, and who also said to carry a water purification pump! You call me stupid, read your own list you pos. As to what needles, not sewing needles. How could you possibly think I meant needles for the sutures? Those needles come already attched to the suture materials. Are you jerking off so much with that vasoline that you brain has become clouded? What I meant by needles was what sized needles on those syringes because it sure as hell makes a big difference depending on what you intend to inject into your lard ass.

Of course now that you apparently made a jerk of yourself with that list of med kit supplies, you decide that it is better not to lug a kit at all. By the way, if fitness and prevention are the key, then why did you go into such a long list of things to put into your med kit including vasoline. My guess is you included it for lubrication probably for anal sex but then you forgot the prevention part in that you forgot to include condoms for your bunk buddies to wear????? Stupid is as stupid does and you have taken and eaten the cake on that one. How does all that white gooey icing taste?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Teufelhund said:
I don't think a cook pot really takes up all that much space in the pack since you can store stuff inside it, mybe stuff you don't want mashed ect.Teuf,
Oh I agree a pot is a good thing to have but not in a medical kit or first aid kit. A first aid kit can be carried on the person at all times in a small fanny pack at the most, or sometimes even in a pocket. Just think, you are in the woods and take a fall and in the process get a nice gash that is filled with debris from the forest floor. Now someone would have you wandering around looking for a water supply in which to use your water purification pump, or worse yet for you to boil. Boil that is after you collect enough fuel to start a fire hot enough and lasting long enough to make water boil for at least 5 minutes (recommended minimum boiling time to sterilize water). Meanwhile you are bleeding and the dirt is working its way into your wound. By that time even a posse with me at its head would be able to track down the infamous JD and lock his butt up all over again. Me I would rather pull out some sterilized eyewash solution, use the squeeze bottle it comes in to direct the solution to wash the wound, then treat it with betadine solution and dress it and go from there.

As to my first aid kit there are one or two more items but I have to actually take a look inside of it to recall all the items. I carry one in my day pack at all times (I have the pack with me just about everywhere). I always carry one in my car, with a bit more in it also.

Oh now I remember an important thing for a first aid kit that I forgot earlier, a small magnifying lens - it goes well with the tweezers that should be in the kit. Very important for removing small fragments. I also bring some adhesive tape, but that is not a necessity.

Thanks for the compliments.
Best regards,
Glenn
 

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When humping a ruck on occasion I have had some chafing! Myself if possible I use Talcum Powder or if I have to, any available foot powder will substitute. I must admit, its the first time I've heard of vaseline used that way!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You mean to tell me that the tough guy of this site is not so tough after all and needs vasoline between his thighs in order to go on a hike! I imagine I am LOL so loudly you can here me hafway across the USA. Who would have thunk it, imagine that the tough man could have a weakness.

I guess vasoline between your thighs is ok if you are hiking in the buff, or with Daisy Duke shorts on with your plump thighs hanging out and rubbing, but if you wear pants then wouldn't it be just a tad messy. The powder is a much better idea if you wear long pants while doing any serious hiking, as is the actual wearing of long pants if you are serious about survival. I really think the vasoline must be for another use.

All the best,
GB
 

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The thought of Melvin in his Daisy Dukes makes me want to pukes. :(

RIKA :D
 
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