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which is about 78 Square inches. 20" disk has 314 square inch target. 4x as big a mark. Once you fire a single shot, the only fully exposed mark you will get, that's holding STILL, is a head on prone man. If you have a fully exposed, stationary torso as a mark, in daylight, it's cause he's unaware of your presence. So you dont HAVE to shoot him. You just WANT to. Big difference. If he's unaware of you, you can get CLOSER, so why risk the miss, hmm? Misses at 500 yds are very commonplace. that's 1500 ft, and at least half a second of bullet flight. A man can cough or sneeze, moving his torso, in 1/4 second, or take a step in .5 second, and half a step is enough to make you miss.
 

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Of course, a single shot from a noisy gun. Did if come from the left? from the right? from in front? or behind?

Are you going to run towards the shot in your effort to get to cover?

A single shot may very well fix someone in place, as they might not know where the shot came from.

Whether or not a person is standing in daylight has ZERO to do with whether they've seen you or not, nor with whether you need to shoot them or not.

I seem to recall someone talking about shooting a dog handler to avoid being caught. (seems like there's one scenario where your theory breaks down.)

You may need to delay a larger group so you can get out of dodge. Might be a good idea to shoot that guy in the open - hmm?

You lay out incomplete scenarios and then insult everyone, trying to sound superior. The problem is, you don't. You just look silly.

you make up a bunch of bs, that I'm sure you've spent a lot of time thinking about, but have ZERO practical experience to back up.

Letting someone get closer works both ways - it's easier for you to kill them, but it's also easier for them to kill you.

The person that can effectively engage the enemy at the longer distance has the advantage over the person that cannot.

we've been through this so many times, and you've been shotdown every single time. Posting the same stuff over and over won't change the outcome.

:devil:
 

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Hits at 500 yds are commonplace for skilled, practised marksman also. Bet you wish you were one!
 

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andy said:
Misses at 500 yds are very commonplace. that's 1500 ft, and at least half a second of bullet flight. A man can cough or sneeze, moving his torso, in 1/4 second, or take a step in .5 second, and half a step is enough to make you miss.
What a laugh. A quick draw sneeze in .25 seconds. And this 1/2 second step. As if the shooter is going to fire while any appearance of the target is about to move. Just another example of gunkids lack of knowlege of shooting at range. Long rang antalope hunters connect regulary at 500 yards, one shot. Snipers all agree that 500 yard shots are easy shots. It's gunkid, with zero experience, flinching, bad back, bad eyesight, who will miss.
 

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Has he ever considered the concept of Harrasment and Interdiction?
One shot whistling into your supposed (safe zone) can be very demoralizing.
 

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Try this gunkid/erika;

Match 9 - 500 Meter Deliberate



(1) Specification:



(a) Distance: 500 meters

(b) Position: Prone

(c) Number of Shots: Two sighting and ten on score

(d) Target: 4-foot (1.2 Meter) screen with Figure 12/59 Type "A" face

(e) Scoring: V, 5, 4 and 3 (There is no Outer scoring 2.)

(f) Type of Fire: Deliberate

(g) HPS: 50.10V

(h) Time Limit: 15 minutes



(2) Procedure:



(a) Each firer is to be given 15 minutes to fire the match.

(b) The scorer is to take a position on the firing mound so that he can carry out proper scoring duties.

(c) Sighting shots are scored and indicated as per record shots and during the same overall time period.

(d) There is no Outer ring scoring 2 on this target.









9.13 Match 10 - 500 Meter Snap



(1) Specification:



(a) Distance: 500 meters

(b) Position: CFSAC/NSCC shot concurrently:

- From Standing to Prone for each exposure

- Bolt-action: Start and remain in Prone

NSCC shot independently:

- All rifles: From Standing to Prone

(c) Number of shots: Two sighting and ten on score

(d) Target: 4-foot (1.2-meter) screen with Figure 12/59, Type "A" face

(e) Scoring: V, 5, 4 and 3 (There is no Outer scoring 2.)

(f) Type of fire: CFSAC/NSCC shot concurrently:

- All rifles: five x 15-second exposures

NSCC shot independently:

- Bolt-action rifles: five x 20-second exposures

(g) Rate of fire: Two shots per exposure

(h) HPS: 50.10V



(2) Procedure:



(a) The firing relay is given 2 minutes to fire both of their sighting shots. The targets are to work independently of each other and react when shot at with the first sighter. A shot indicator is placed in the shot hole and the target is shown to the firer. The target is left up until the second sighter is fired. The target is brought down and the second sighter is indicated and the target is shown to the firer with both shot indicators in place. If a miss is fired, then the target is brought down, examined and shown without appropriate shot indicator. On completion of sighting shots, targets are to be patched.

(b) Once commanded by the RO the firers will apply their safety catch and adopt the standing alert position.

(c) On the appearance of the target the firer will have 15 seconds[17] to adopt the prone position and fire 2 shots. The time between exposures will be 10 - 20 seconds.

(d) Between exposures the firer must return to the standing alert position[18] and remain so until the next exposure.

(e) Upon completion of the match, shot indicators are put in each shot hole and are shown to the firer until all scoring procedures are complete.

(f) The scoring relay will move forward, obtain the firer's scorecard and be prepared to copy down the score received from the butts.

(g) Challenging procedures will be through the FPO.
 
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