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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took a competition shooting class from Ron Avery a few years back. Avery owns and operates the Practical Shooting Academy, making his living teaching handgun skills to law enforcement agencies, special military ops, federal agencies like the Air Marshals, and so on. He is a former LEO himself and he also won the Limited 10 USPSA National title a few years back, shooting a good old single stack. He operates out of the Whittington Center in Raton. The guy is for real.

Anyhow, we got Avery to Wyoming to tech all us wanna be IPSC shooters how to play the game. Wyoming is a shall issue state and as would be expected, everyone in the class packs iron now and then and of course we all have the infamous "truck gun". As you would suspect, during one of our breaks the usual BS session migrated to defensive shooting. One of the guys asked just how good was good enough as far as pistolcraft was concerned.

I expected Avery to come up with some esoteric reply like, "You can never be too good." I was suprised. Without hesitation he looked the guy right in the eye and told him something to the effect, " The average B class shooter has all the necessary shooting skills to survive any gunfight. Pistolcraft is only one third of the equation." Now that's food for thought. He continued for quite some time explaining his thoughts and he made another statement that blew me away. Avery made an anology between the martial arts (he does that too) and shooting. He said, "B class is the black belt of IPSC shooting. When you get to B class you have the fundamentals and the rest of the journey is just a matter of committing the required resources."

So much for the idea that a person needs to be a Grand Master IPSC gunslinger to be worth a crap on the street. FWIW, I shoot IPSC with two firearms trainers. One trains for a municipal department and the other a state agency. Both of them are B class shooters and I would go through a SHTF scenario with those guys any day. Another one of our club members is a lowly C class shooter with the makings of a B class shooter if he would just show up and shoot. He just got out of the military and he was one of them SEAL fella's. Just from what I have seen of the way the guy moves, shoots, thinks, and so on, I have a hunch he would smoke the average bandit like a cheap cigar.
 

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I think Avery is right Ron. Mind set, tactics and correct rapid reflexive respnses are as important as marksmanship.
 

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that's right, since ipsc only RARELY tests what matters, the sub 10 ft stuff,and even IDPA only rarely limits a match to such, and almost never requires ccw throughout the match, and most of the guys dont have a CLUE how to move really fast,up really close. For instance,how many of you can break a 2 x4 with a kick, while making a ccw draw and firing at the same arm's length range,hmm? NONE of ya, that's how many. I've practiced such things since 1973,when I made black belt.
 

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erika/gunkid, your a WANNABE. Well stated Hard Ball.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
IDPA only rarely limits a match to such, and almost never requires ccw throughout the match
Actually, IDPA clubs almost universally require concealment with the exception of the classifier and those clubs that waive cover requirements during exceptionally hot summer months. All of the clubs I have shot at require drawing from concealment.
 
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