Firearm Forums - Arms Locker banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
with the net-hammock, 50x10 ft of 2" mesh monofilament around one leg, the camo net around the other leg, in between the bugnet suits, inside of my pants. I had a drum liner outside of my pants (no debris involved). I wore a medium coat to simulate the kevlar vest and groin protector If it's shtf, I'll have 2 of 55-gallon drum-liners aroujnd my chest. I wore gloves, un-laced shoes, socks, socks, sock liners, balaclava, shemagh. This combo worked like a charm. Given damp debris between the liners and the bivy, I can handle 10F, cause the wraps around me and the metallized tyvek bivy wont let the moisture get to me. so it turns out that I dont need the dry debris until it's below 10F, and can I dry out enough of it in one night to put between the liners and my body, using the UCO lantern, beeswax candle and my body heat inside of the reflective bivy. Then I'll be able to handle 0F.

At such temps, nobody will bother me about having an open fire (at night) down in a gully or creek bad, with bed of hot rocks drying out enough debris to fill the area between the liners and the bivy. The buttpack and daypack can be stuffed with damp debris and it wont matter, when they are used as sleeping pads.. I'll have enough thickness of dry stuff and moisture-blocking bivy and drum-liners, that the moisture has no chance of reaching me.. Its never any colder than that around here in daylight and for shtf, movement needs to be done at night anyway. Movement is worth 20F degrees when you're all wrapped up as delineated above.

When the 50x10 ft 2" mesh monofilament netting is folded 3x, making the 10x 6 ft hammock, it's already got 8 layers. When you fold it 2 more times, making it 1.5 ft wide x 10 ft, it's got 32 layers. Given that it's 10 ft long, that makes for a lot of wraps around your leg and butt. The 7x5 ft camo net, folded twice, is 5 layers, very "fluffy". The thing most people doen't understand is that it's the trapped AIR that insulates you from the cold and wind. The 'stuffings" dont matter, as long as they hold the layers of clothing and coverings part, and dont let your body moisture build up as a layer on your skin.

I did not have a hot meal nor hot drink, nor exercise before entering the bivy. I was dehydrated, too, having had only a couple of sips of water when I woke up at 4-30 pm. All of those things should of course be taken care of before bedding down for the night. This includes having the plastic pee bag (raw water container) with the tape on it, so I can ID it in the dark. Nobody likes to leave a warm sleeping bag in the middle of the night and getting back into the tented bivy is a pita.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,482 Posts
You have already forgotten about snow in Texas, haven't you?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,098 Posts
And the -20to -25F we had last winter.


I've also been out backpacking over Christmas break when one day it was probably in the 60's and it plunged the next day to -10 was prepared temp wise but the ran then freezing rain that turned into snow was not fun for getting around.
Since the trail markers were white.😜
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,929 Posts
...50x10 ft of 2" mesh monofilament around one leg, the camo net around the other leg

...When the 50x10 ft 2" mesh monofilament netting is folded 3x, making the 10x 6 ft hammock, it's already got 8 layers. When you fold it 2 more times, making it 1.5 ft wide x 10 ft, it's got 32 layers. Given that it's 10 ft long, that makes for a lot of wraps around your leg and butt.
500 square feet of net around one leg..?

Wrapping something "32 layers thick" multiple times around your butt and one leg? I'm genuinely having difficulty picturing one wraps their butt but only one leg with something ten feet long.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,098 Posts
It's too bad the shuttle fleet was retired. I think Melvin missed his calling as a door gunner on one.
Or a screen door repair technician aboard a submarine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,929 Posts
To be fair, after it percolating in the background for a while, maybe you start by wrapping it around your waist and then drop it down & wrap it around your leg. So it's possible, but still not sure on what's the insulative value of 32 layers of monofilament net wrapped around an extremity. And even whatever degree (no pun intended) of insulation it provides, having your leg encased in 500 square feet of net (nevermind the two bugnet suits) under your pants has got to seriously impede mobility and the ability to respond to any dangers; whether attacker, animal, fire or whatever.

I have to go back again to the "buy some insulated coveralls" suggestion, or at least something similar. I don't know the total cost of all these different monofilament nets, camo nets, bugnet suits, and whatever else is involved, but a decent set of insulated coveralls can be had for $60-$80, and a $12 NeverWet kit will make their outer shell absolutely water-shedding for years. So for less than a hundred dollars and an hour's worth of waterproofing (spraying) time, problem solved. May not be the ultimate backpacker's setup, but WORLDS better than wrapping one leg in this folded-up net, wrapping your butt & other leg in this other folded-up net, etc. All these different "$30 on amazon" nets & such, and still trying to find a solution seems so much harder (and expensive and labor-intensive) than necessary to achieve a substantially better result by just doing it once; even doing it cheaply.

Here we go -

$75 for insulated coveralls (same brand I've used for years). Can be had from Medium to XX-Large for the same price:
Sleeve Gesture Dress shirt Collar Khaki


and $12 for extremely good waterproofing:

So for $87 and one hour of time, problem solved MUCH better than this Sanford & Son approach that we've seen tested, modified, and re-tested for literally years now. You could sleep in it, you could walk around in it, you could get up & run in it if the need arose. I applaud and appreciate experimentation and learning, but this is like watching someone try to build a better alternative to a gasoline-engine car using logs, legos and various types of chicken wire. For years. Over & over. For years. Again and again. For years...

John - seriously, if you want a simple solution that's easier and less expensive, at least consider the waterproof insulated coverall thing, or something similarly "once & done" in approach. But if you just enjoy wrapping nets and forest debris around your butt for some reason, then more power to you I guess.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BigEd

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,098 Posts
If he looked around a Level 7 ECWS coat and pants set would work around as well or better. The surplus New/Unissed ones are for sure waterproof.
And a few years ago picked up a coat at a local surplus/ outdoor store.
That thing is over kill here and puts my older Columbia Widgeon IV coat to shame for being hot in freezing temps.
I still need to snag the over pants.

I don't know what they go for in his sizing but if patient maybe $25 to $30 per top and bottom pieces surplus/used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,411 Posts
Pictures would be so helpful, as what he describes sounds like a cross between the Stay-puff marshmallow man and the Michelin man.

I just have a very difficult time seeing any practicality to what he is doing.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top