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about how 223 can baffles have to be "K", "M", reflex, etc, designs. (in other words, forget making your own). The simple bronze and aluminum screenwire donuts of my .22 design work just fine for the front 5" of my 223 can-design. The rear 3" of the can needs to be a blast-diffuser, made out of aluminum rod. It must be a slip fit inside the inner tube of the can. The outside, "sleeve" can is 7" long, and 1 3/4" OD, .050" wall thickness, aluminum. The inner tube is 8" long, 1 3/8 OD aluminum, .050" wall thickness. The rear 3" of the inner tube has 8 rows of 1/8" ID holes, serving to vent the hottest, dirtiest, highest pressure gases into the area between the sleeve tube and the inner tube. A "washer" is of course welded in between the tubes, one at each end, so that the "sleeve area" is a gas tight container.

The blast diffuser is simply a 3" long, 1.250" OD cylinder of aluminum, which has cuts made into its sides, one every .5", about .400" wide, leaving a 5/8" OD core, at the bottom of each cut, , which has 8 holes in it. these holes go into the sides of this central core, so as to vent the powder gases out to the side of the diffuser, into the 'sleeve area" between the 2 tubes. This diffuser thus takes a LOT of the burden of heat-blast off of the simple, folded, spindled, and "formed" screenwire donuts. A simple, 5 pc "tool kit", powered by mallet-blows, suffices to form the donut-baffles.

So there's 7 "vanes", about .100" wide, that hold the full OD, keeping the diffusor in line with the barrel. It looks a bit like a drill bit for a hand auger, for drilling wood, but there's no screw type advance of the vanes. they are just machined at 90 degree angles, down into the sides of the diffuser. The front of each of the cuts IS CONCAVED outward and forward a bit, tho, so as to vent the gases to the sides a bit more efficiently.

This diffuser,the "sleeve tube"arrangement, and putting an aluminum washer atop each of the "small hole" screenwire donut baffles, is ALL you need to make a fine can for any high powered rifle. The hole that is lengthwise thru the diffuser needs to be about .275"-.290", depending upon how closely you held your other tolerances, as you made the can. Every other donut is a "big hole" baffle, with a 3/4" ID hole in it.The donut sceenwire baffles are about 3/8" long, ya see. Atop each small hole baffle is a 1/8" thick neoprene washer. The aluminum washer, (.065" thick) sits atop the "wipe". The ID holes in the "small hole" donuts needs to be the same, or a big larger, than the one in your blast diffuser. Ditto the ID holes in your aluminum washer. Use the end of a red hot rod to "cauterize" such a hole in the rubber "wipes". The different sized ID holes serves to "work" the gases better than if all your baffles were just "small hole" baffles, and it lightens the can, as well as reduces how much of the expensive,hard to find bronze screen that you need to make the can. This 223 can weighs 12 ozs. A final washer, and an internal snapring (in a groove, inside the inner tube, in the front 1/4" of the can, serves as a front endcap. THAT(last, front) washer needs about a 3/8" hole, because it can move around a bit, in the groove. That means that it CAN 'shift sideways" a bit, making it possible for the bullet to hit the side of the washer, which aint a good thing.

Atop shall mean with the can pointed up vertically, with the rear of the can down on your workbench.
 

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A pillow jammed on the muzzle will work too, but that doesn't mean it's a good way to supress a weapon.

Give it up johnny, your wire screen baffles are the kiddy toy of supressors and there are reasons why no serious maker uses them.

It's because they SUCK! Of course you know alot about sucking don't you?

Wire screens and rubber wipes are a joke.
 

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thanks for all the info!

i was wondering, how did you 'crimp'? a groove to retain the snap ring holding the whole 'show' together, a tig welder would be handy,no?

or, was the snap ring retainer groove ground into that .050" tube?


just wondering, out loud , while you seem to be somewhat semi-lucid!





thanks.
 

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I still want to know what kind of tube he is using... are you just using any kind of steel tube you can find? Seriously, I am interested in knowing...

Mike
 
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