Arms Locker banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,164 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was going to use one of my M-1 Garands for Deer hunting for a change of pace. Then I learned the 180 Grain ammunition I normally use could damage the operating rod. I bought some boxes of 150 Grain Remingon Soft Point and now people are telling me it will tear yup my Garand as well. I went on the CMP Forum and it was all conflicting and turned into a real good internet fight about using FMJ for hunting which wasn't my question at all. Any opinions? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,621 Posts
I was going to use one of my M-1 Garands for Deer hunting for a change of pace. Then I learned the 180 Grain ammunition I normally use could damage the operating rod. I bought some boxes of 150 Grain Remingon Soft Point and now people are telling me it will tear yup my Garand as well. I went on the CMP Forum and it was all conflicting and turned into a real good internet fight about using FMJ for hunting which wasn't my question at all. Any opinions? Thanks.

ok for further reference to all you m1 garand shooters out there. the m1 garand is a semi-automatic gas operated riifle. i was designed to fire a 150 gr bullet at 2700 to 2750 fps with a medium burning rate powder, such as 4064, 4895, 3031 and a bunch of others that weren't around when the rifle was designed. if the velocity is higher than 2750 fps the sites will not be click adjustable with any degree of accuracy. not to mention that the gas system will be over pressured, thus mil. surplus ammo at these velocities is more suited for theses rifles than commercial ammo at 2850 fps. with velocities below 2700 fps the gas system may not operate reliably all the time. the rifle was not designed to shoot 180 gr bullets. you can do it but velocities need to be adjusted so that the action works reliability and you must disregard higher bullets speeds. when shooting a 180 gr bullet in an m1 garand and if functions correctly and reliability at 2400 fps. it is best not to try and get higher velocities, the most you will accomplish is to wear your rifle out faster, and worst case would be the sudden dis-assembly under pressure of the weapon while firing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
675 Posts
Neo, that 'sudden disassembly' you mention is a bad thing.... sounds painful too.

Anyone see any issue with taking milsurp ammo, pulling the fmj off it and replacing it with a good hunting bullet of the same weight?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
I have heard that cartridges made that way are called "Mexican match" ammo.

RIKA



Anyone see any issue with taking milsurp ammo, pulling the fmj off it and replacing it with a good hunting bullet of the same weight?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,621 Posts
Neo, that 'sudden disassembly' you mention is a bad thing.... sounds painful too.

Anyone see any issue with taking milsurp ammo, pulling the fmj off it and replacing it with a good hunting bullet of the same weight?
what you mention is what i do with corrosive 8mm ammo. i pull the bullet and transfer the powder and bullet to my boxer primed cases. as for switching bullets with a milsurp load i see no problems with it, as long as your using the same weight bullet. as for the sudden dis-assembly i got to see it happen a number of years ago. the fellow in question seems he didn't have time to make his reloads so he was shooting remington 150 gr hunting ammo in the match. i think it was his 4th or 5th round when the rifle came unglued bent the op-rod, broke the stock, and bent a whole mess of little parts. didn't completely total the rifle but sure cost him to fix it. all just to save some time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,927 Posts
as for switching bullets with a milsurp load i see no problems with it, as long as your using the same weight bullet
With the same bullet length, the same tangent/secant profile, etc...

Not the safest thing to do. I would suppose, in this instance, QuickLoad is your friend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,621 Posts
With the same bullet length, the same tangent/secant profile, etc...

Not the safest thing to do. I would suppose, in this instance, QuickLoad is your friend.
DW bullet length, bearing surface, and profile are not going to cause any issues that will cause concern. pressures no matter what bullet you use should be within 0.5% to 1.0% as long as bullet weights are the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,927 Posts
DW bullet length, bearing surface, and profile are not going to cause any issues that will cause concern. pressures no matter what bullet you use should be within 0.5% to 1.0% as long as bullet weights are the same.
There is 4-6,000 PSI more going from 155gr FMJBT to a VLD type bullet depending on the specific bullet (A-Max and Scenars on the higher end), load density, and how the throat is set up. At least that is how it is in the .308.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,621 Posts
There is 4-6,000 PSI more going from 155gr FMJBT to a VLD type bullet depending on the specific bullet (A-Max and Scenars on the higher end), load density, and how the throat is set up. At least that is how it is in the .308.
DW he was talking about going from an 150 gr. fmj to a 150 gr. hunting bullet. that means that he'll be shooting a 150 gr. flat base or 150 gr. boat-tail. i don't see any problems arising from the switch. as you mention going to a heaver bullet with a major difference in profile and bearing surface can make about a 5% difference in chamber pressure with an 06 size case. alas this is not what he was asking about though. as for the 308 its load density curve is higher due to the case volume, thus small changes make a bigger difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,608 Posts
Buy a box of 20 and chrono them!!!!! That will give you an accurate answer.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top