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Here's how I made the sheath for my recent knife project.

The base knife I used for the project was a Himalayan Imports 'PenKnife'. The finished 'PK Tracker' prototype has a blade length from tip to handguard of 7" with an overall length of 12", the handle is hickory, the steel buttcap and handguard have been cold-blued, and the blade has been treated with a 3 hour vinegar dip (I don't like cold-blue on blades which might cut food).



After I redid my PK, the old sheath didn't fit right. Modifying it was not so good since the light, soft, wood liner had broken in a couple of places.

I like the traditional style of sheath that the khukuris came with, and it's modern equivalent, the scabbard/frog setup that is used on modern bayonets.

It is very practical and comfortable to wear, especially with a modern nylon frog. However, the soft wooden clamshell liner in the original HI supplied scabbard could really be improved.

Not only is it fragile, but you run the risk of inadvertently cutting the scabbard leather and maybe even cutting yourself. There was even a small cut in the leather when I got my PK.

All in all, it's a good system, it just needs a wee bit of an upgrade with some modern materials.



So, I decided to make a bayonet style scabbard, with a bit of the traditional look and with a one piece liner made of a modern material, both for durability and safety. I was more concerned with durability and practicality than the original 'look'.

I went down to Home Depot and for $2 got a 4ft piece of 1-1/2" PVC pipe. I heated a section of one end of it up over a charcoal barbecue grill, bent it and flattened it.

NOTE: You should bend it BEFORE you flatten it, as when you flatten it the plastic will acquire a new 'memory' and it will frustrating to bend it after that where it will stay bent.

After I got it shaped and formed, I made it tight so it would hold the blade firmly but still allow a one hand, quick withdrawal.

I then cut off the section that was to be the scabbard and trimmed the scabbard tip with a hacksaw.

Then I stuck the trimmed scabbard tip back in real close to the charcoal so only the tip would heat. With the tip soft, I pinched the ends closed and into shape with a pair of pliers.

After it cooled, I glued the end together and shut with PVC pipe glue, holding it firmly but gently shut for drying with a pair of vice grips. After it dried, I trimmed the end with a file and then buffed the entire scabbard liner with 60 grit sandpaper.








I then glued a leather slide-stop to the top to help keep the scabbard in the frog. The adhesive used was 3M automotive super weatherstrip adhesive.



I didn't have enough thin leather on hand, so I covered the scabbard with thick, waterproof, black cordura nylon backpack fabric.

The scabbard was sewn up the back in the traditional manner. I also sealed the seams and protected the threads in the way I do with my leather and wood scabbards with black Permatex automotive super weatherstrip adhesive.

I also reused the brass chape from the old scabbard. The chape had been previously modified to be rounded out and it was modified a bit to fit the new scabbard. A drainage hole was drilled though the chape and into the scabbard.

(continued in the next post)
 

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Here are some pics of the completed rig.

The pouch hold a variety of gear: 24 assorted fish hooks, a dozen needles (various sizes, straight and curved), 50 hour LED flashlight with lithium batteries (very bright light), 14 iodine water tabs (in a sealed container), two steel sewing machine bobbins (one filled with monofilament fishing line and another with black nylon thread), magnesium firetool, EZ-Lap model 26F 1"x3" diamond hone with a fishhook groove, small backup compass with a nylon neck lanyard, USGI P38 can opener, and a small Victorinox Classic Swiss Army Knife (tweezers, toothpick, scissors, blade, file, screwdriver).

The cordura nylon pouch is tied to the frog with paracord next to a bundle of several yards of extra military paracord.






 

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That's a pretty interesting setup, Mike. I notice you did the built-in "survival kit" thing.

Good work on the knife and scabbard.
 

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excellent

piece of gear[i liked your work you done on the blade from an earlier post] the wideblade/chopping effect of that blade is worth it's weight in gold, out in the bush.

you do good work.

thanks.
 

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VERY creative.Thanks for the idea!
 

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Beautiful job. Thanks for sharing.

RIKA :)
 
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