Firearm Forums - Arms Locker banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Original idea suggested by Magnum88C: "You have a Nagant revolver right? How's about starting off by telling us more about that. Does it use the same 7.62 ammo as the Tokarev?"

The most unusual revolver I own is the M1895 Nagant. Its Russian made, Belgian designed and first manufactured in 1895. They were produced throughout WW1, the 1930's and up until the end of WW2 when the Tokarev was adopted.

My revolver was made at the Tula Arsenal in 1943. Fit and finish is very good for a wartime model. It weighs 36oz, has a 4.5in barrel and a 7 shot cylinder. Mine is double action/single action. DA pull is probably around 25lbs and surely favored by Cossacks. SA pull is around 8lbs and fairly crisp. It shoots the Rimmed 7.62 Nagant cartridge and is very hard to find. I bought a box of Fiocchi at the gunshow for $25 just to have some. The cartridge is .30 caliber, 1.5in long and rimmed. The lead bullet is seated inside the case just like a wadcutter. There is a reason for this. When the hammer is cocked, the cylinder moves forward and actually closes the barrel-cylinder gap. The Nagant is probably the only revolver in the world that could be successfully suppressed!

Now what does an average person shoot in this puppy? I shoot el-cheapo 32 revolver ammo. Shorts, mediums and longs. Sure some of the cases split but it hits well enough for head shots at 15yds. BTW the Longs shoot best. Don't shoot the 7.62x25 Tokarev cartridge in your revolver. I don't think it would even fire but if it did your gun would explode!

Reloading is impossibly slow. You have to unlatch the loading gate and then unscrew the ejector rod from the frame, swing it to the side and then push forward to eject the cases one at a time like the Colt SAA. Problem is that the Nagant doesn't have a spring to retract the ejector rod. You have to PULL it backward each time after pushing out a case and before you can rotate the cylinder. I would rather use the revolver as a club than have to reload it in battle.

The 1895 Nagant is a fascinating example of engineering from years gone by, a piece of history that you can hold in your hand and can be even used as a defensive weapon in these modern times. Its fun to shoot and cheap to own. If you love strange mechanical things you'll love the Nagant.

RIKA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,890 Posts
IIRC the double action was the officer's model, the soldier's model was a single action. I've noticed the price of the single action was considerably higher, which was the opposite of the way I thought it'd be. Any idea on what soldiers were issued these and why there are much fewer of them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
LOL! You're making me tell a really strange story/explanantion that I read. The story goes that the soldiers were issued the SA because they fired slower and would make the undisciplined soldier aim & shoot more carefully. The officers, being more disciplined, got the DAs. Considering the DA pull weight it should have been the opposite.

IMHO some slick salesman sold the Russian govt on the idea that Double Action was the "wave of the future" and the "only way to go". Suckers!

You're right though. The SA only revolvers are very rare. I would love to have one.

RIKA
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top