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and LOOK for that front sight, THEN add the rear sight alignment, if the target size and range require it. It takes a lot of work to learn this, but it's SUPER fast once it's reflexive for you.
 

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There is an opposing point of view. Many of the top trainers today teach to bring the pistol up in a horizontal plane with the center line of the bore perpendicular to the target face. The front sight will appear high during the early part of the presentation because your eyes are above the centerline of the bore, but when the pistol reaches eye level the sights will be in alignment without hunting around. Ron Avery teaches this method.

According to Enos, you should not have to look for the sights, but simply confirm alignment. You must be able to bring the pistol up with your eyes closed, then open your eyes with the front sight already in the rear notch. Enos teaches 4 awareness exercises in his book. It's worth your time to practice until the sight always appears in alignment when you open your eyes, from the draw, when changing hands, etc.

In Matt Burkett's video he addresses the problem of bringing the gun up with the front sight high. At the end of the draw stroke you must lower the front sight into the rear notch and the pistol will porpoise, losing valuable time.

In my case, I am quilty of constantly overaiming, I am slow to react and my presentation lacks proper technique on the last part of the stroke, costing me a couple of tenths. But hey, I am working on it.
 
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