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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought some .45cal 200gr FP plated bullets made by Berry's Mfg.

Wonder if anyone else has tried these or any other brand of plated bullets?

And, should I use the same reload data as for jacketed bullets?

I was thinking of 5.0 to 6.0grs of Unique for these as a load range to start with. Meaning loading up a few rounds in 0.1 increments and seeing what they do as far as groups pressure etc.
 

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TODD 3465 said:
And, should I use the same reload data as for jacketed bullets?

I was thinking of 5.0 to 6.0grs of Unique for these as a load range to start with. Meaning loading up a few rounds in 0.1 increments and seeing what they do as far as groups pressure etc.
Logic says you should use the same data. Testing in .1 or .2 increments sounds good too. If you have some 231 you should try that also. I love that powder for my 45 and 9mm loads.

Please let us know the results.

RIKA
 

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I would use the loading data for jacketed bullets, as data for lead is usually downloaded just to prevent leading.

Please give a range report when you can, I'm wondering at the accuracy potential of plated bullets. I wouldn't think they'd be as good as jacketed, but you never know, depends on how the plating is done.
 

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i would say your good!

with those 200grainers @6.5 gr unique.

ALTHOUGH,thats just me![230 gr.copper plated projo x 6.5 unique]


ALTHOUGH,upon reflection, i like a slow comfortable punkin' ball compared to a fast 'whacker' in my .45acp


thanks.

[I never use the WORD 'although' in casual conversation,only on the net.]

go figure, huh!
 

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I've used Rainier plated bullets for quite a while, never shot Berry's. I've seen two problems, not particularly bad ones.

One, if velocity is cranked up, copper fouling becomes quite severe. Can foul a bore as bad a lead.

Two, Rainier makes a hollow-point in some weights/calibers. (Don't know if Berrys does or not). Those hollow-points don't expand worth warm dog spit unless you get the velocity up to where fouling becomes excessive.

For just punching paper, they're great. Cheap and more uniform than cast.

Speer Gold Dots are made with some sort of plating/bonding process, and they are about the best bullets I've ever used, as far a terminal performance goes.

DC
 

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Are you sure about that .45Colt?

Speer's site says they are jacketed with a bonded core for the Gold Dot.

Gold Dot
 

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In the SPEER #13 load manual, they semi-describe the process used to make the Gold Dots. They never use the word "plated", but they do say the jacket is "pure copper, built up on the core molecule by molecule". (Not an exact quote, but as close as I can get without the book right in front of me). That's plating as near as I can tell. Whatever technique they use to "bond" it to the core, it certainly works. I've never seen a separation, no matter what medium it is fired into, including some really harsh stuff.

DC
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well it l got up to 6.0grs with no troubles today at the range.

Shot in both my Gov't models and my Glock 36 with no pressure signs and decent accuracy. Again as with the 9mm today no benching just testing for function off hand rapid fire.
I'd like to try some of Berry's plated 185's and use the same charge I do for my 185gr XTP loads and see what they will do.
 

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My guess is that "jacketed" can be used in lieu of the word "plated" as any cover of the lead core could be considered a jacket so to speak, but the words probably cannot be used visa versa as plated is a seemingly more specific term. Of course I am only playing at semantics here, and don't have a clue as to what the manufacturers would think along those lines.
 

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I think perhaps "jacketed" would have something to do with the thickness of the copper coating, whereas "plating" would be more of a one-dip process?

Here's Speer's description of their Gold Dot (from the link given above.

TECHNOLOGY . . .


* Nose profiled for smooth function in semi-autos
* Both core and jacket are notched for uniform expansion
* Cavity tuned to the job
* Pure copper jacket bonded to core
* [bJacket[/b] thickness very uniform
* Alloyed core for barrier penetration without sacfricing expansion
* Square heel for accuracy


Not arguing with anyone (I read the Speer manual also), but it seems they refer to it as a jacket, and the only reason I can think of is due to the thickness.
 
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