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I have three loads for my .280 (actually 5, but there's 3 I'm using right now) - I have a load for Barnes TSX, Barnes XLC, and Win Failsafes. I recently found several boxes of XLCs and Failsafes that I didn't realize I had. So I loaded them, and afterwards I was looking at a box of TSX's I had loaded. Something about the label and the powder charge listed bothered me. Yep, I had loaded the TSXs with load data for the XLCs and was about 3 grains over max.

I verified this by weighing a loaded round, pulling the bullet and dumping the powder and then weighing the cartridge and the bullet without the powder.

3 grains isn't necessarily a big deal, but I know from experience that I don't get the best accuracy with a max load from this bullet. Plus, I really never load past maximum as a personal rule.

I always re-label the boxes with the current load data, even if it is a duplicate of what was on the box before. This is how I caught the error.

Double check everything, even if you know you're right.

complacency kills.
 

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That's the kind of stuff that'll get you. When I was new to reloading, I reloaded some Blazer aluminum .357 magnum cases. They used a berdan primer, meaning two flash holes already in the primer pocket, and when I deprimed them, it created a third flash hole. The aluminum cases were soft enough that I didn't realize that in the decapping I was punching thru the pocket material. (Again, new to reloading)

After I later learned of my mistake - after shooting all of them - I got to wondering how much (if any) added pressure was generated due to the much-greater flash access. Also realized how lucky I might have been that I was shooting them in an L-frame and may have just got lucky.
 

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Well, I know somehow I got it in my head that I forgot to crimp the .45ACP test loads I tried the other day.
Then remembered that I didn't use or own a factory crimp die in .45ACP.
My next steps are increasing the taper crimp a little and then other test loads using the factory crimp die if needed. Main thing is not causing a pressure spike when I do.

Now going back to a big SNAFU that thankfully was prevented from being worse by a over built barrel.
One of the earliest "fun guns" I had. But my father "owned ". Was a Volunteer Enterprises.45ACP "Commando" Thompson look a like sort of carbine.
I had acquired a LEE bullet mold and one of those inexpensive Lee Hand Loading tools and a few other items to do it without a bench type set up.
Well, used the included powder chart and scoop; sans scale.
Problem was that the starting loads were probably listed for a pistol of 5" and not a+/-16.5" bbl Carbine. Which had fairly thick steel around the bore, thankfully.
Cutting to the chase I ended up with not one but two yes 2 cast bullets stuck in the barrel. Drove them out and had the barrel inspected. No damage and soon ended up with a real RCBS reloading set up.
Noticed something was wrong when nothing was impacting the target and ejection was barely happening.
 

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I don't think I've ever used anything but the simple crimp of the seating die for .45acp or 9mm either one. I use Lee dies, and adjusting the seating die (which does require some micro-tweaking at initial setup) has always been adequate for my purposes. The loads I do in those calibers are almost all just for close-in use, mostly clanging steel at 10-40 yards anymore, and that's always worked plenty well for that kind of shooting. If I were loading hunting or self-defense ammo, it would probably be beneficial to go an extra step; but the seating die alone has worked well enough for my admittedly low-brow purposes.
 

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I use a Lee Taper crimp die on 11 different calibers including .45 acp. Great piece of kit.

.38 spl
9mm
.38 super
.44 mag,
.45acp
.45 Colt
6.5x55mm
.32-40 (Hornady)
.30-30
.30 carbine
.30-06
.223
 

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I don't think I've ever used anything but the simple crimp of the seating die for .45acp or 9mm either one. I use Lee dies, and adjusting the seating die (which does require some micro-tweaking at initial setup) has always been adequate for my purposes. The loads I do in those calibers are almost all just for close-in use, mostly clanging steel at 10-40 yards anymore, and that's always worked plenty well for that kind of shooting. If I were loading hunting or self-defense ammo, it would probably be beneficial to go an extra step; but the seating die alone has worked well enough for my admittedly low-brow purposes.
Mine has worked fine too except for the case of this new fangled(to me anyways) Ramshot Silhouette that I'm trying to puzzle out.
 

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I've got the Lee Crimp Die types for the following:
5.56NATO/ 223REM

7.62NATO/.308WIN

.300BO

.45ACP
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Intend to get one for the following:

.38spl.
.357mag
.30-'06
 

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you won't regret it
 
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