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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This subject was touched upon in another thread. I believe it is worth visiting to iron out some valid points.
What are some of the signs of being "out of time"? I would assume the most common issue would be lead shaving from the cylinder to the barrel?
So, how does one check the timing? What are some other clues to being out of time?
Once a timing issue is identified, how do you go about correcting it?
I'm sure there are many reasons this could happen (worn parts, loose fittings, etc...) Besides the replacement of parts, are there other methods of adjustment?
I'm also sure there are brand specific issues, anyone have ideas or seen specific issues with specific brand names?
 

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Gently rest your thumb against the cylinder while you draw back the hammer, making a slight drag. If the hammer reaches its cocked position before the cylinder finishes rotating, then you may have a timing concern. Even if you do, the rotational inertia of the cylinder will probably finish rotating the cylinder.

If it is out of timing, buy a book about how to fix it or take it to a gunsmith. Modern revolvers are far less likely to go out of timing, due to some design improvements and CNC manufacturing. If you were to buy a new Taurus or S&W today, odds are you would not have to worry about timing for the rest of your life.
 

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No to argue or anything but I had a 686, 627 and 29 Hunter model that went out of time.

The 686 I could almost see because I shot it alot but the other two were hardly fired when they had troubles, though that was back in S&W's gun of the month days.

I am tempted to try out their new ones though with the redesigned lockwork.
 

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This is one reason I like Rugers for serious hard-hitting handgunning. You can feel and audibly hear the cylinder lock up LONG before full cock. Just that much more built-in insurance against failure. Whereas my Smiths lock up very slightly before full cock, and I presume that's why they tend to go out of time faster.
 

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I think I read somewhere that Colt Pythons would go out of time rather quickly with heavy shooting. Can't say I have really checked mine for it, though. At what point does this condition become dangerous?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My concern is with the Diamondback. If I put a steady pressure on the cylinder as it rotates, it will not lock up. If I let it go without pressure it locks up.
I guess it's either time to study up or get an experienced gunsmith to take a look.
 

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Dang Clint! Why waste your money just to find out your Diamondback is worn out and defective? I'll send you $200 and get a FFL copy and you can just sent that old piece of junk to me and save yourself a lot of headaches and trouble?

What do you say? :)


Seriously, you have stumbled on one of the secrets for sometimes being able to beat someone down on price that has a Colt for sale and doesn't know about this little trick. I don't know about ALL Colts, but with Pythons, Anacondas, and Diamondbacks, they all do what you are describing. They will not lock up when you pull the hammer back and put tension on the cylinder. But pull the trigger. It locks up THEN before the hammer will fall. You will notice that the trigger pull is a LOT stiffer than when you fire it normally. That is just the way it is designed.

If you get a seller that doesn't know this little trick, you might be able to beat him down a bit more on the price lamenting the "fact" that his Colt is defective and dangerous. :laugh:

Some dealers don't even know this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, let me think............Maybe for a pair of Bloodered Lavenders! :D

I'm glad to hear it's nothing seriuos. I was thinking that there should never be any pressure on the cylinder when firing anyway so it shouldn't be a problem.

Interesting tidbit for sure.

Thanks Rich!
 

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There's many possible alignment problems

with revolvers. Why do you THINK that the rear of the barrel has a tapered "forcing cone", hmm? to allow for less than perfect alignment of cylinder to barrel, of course. With modern CNC manufacture, the odds of a chamber's being cut at a bad angle are less, but it's still possible. Also very possible is a bent crane or cylinder pin, or a bent barrel. All it takes is a fall to the pavement, and that could easily have happened to a brand new gun.

Issues that also crop up are end shake and flashgap, either too little or too much of the latter. Smiths with endshake can be helped by the addition of some thin shim "washers", sold by Brownell's.

Issues caused by wear (dryfire as well as live firing) are those related to the cylinder hand, ejector star, the notches on the outside of the cylinder, and the sides of the cylinder bolt. These of course manifest themselves more slowly, but if you shoot or dryfire a lot (say 10,000 rds a year, 40,000 drysnaps) you can expect to have to "peen" the hand longer (with a hammer and anvil) or replace it once a year, and every 2-3 years, you will have to replace the ejector star and cylinder bolt
 
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