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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really like having something catch dinner for me while I do other things. Conibear 110 size traps catch squirrels, rabbits, muskrats and similar sized game and can be set by an average sized woman or husky child. Quick, re-usable and deadly. It only takes practice to learn how to effectively use it. The 220 and 330 traps are heavier for larger animals but require a tool to set them with.

Snares are the same in usefulness and come in sizes to fit whatever you want to catch. Anything from squirrels to deer and hogs. Not always re-usable because the animal can really twist them up when fighting it but they can be re-built easily if you have extra cable and pliers/crimper.

Frog gigs are perfect for those nights when you demand a gourmet meal. All it takes is a straight stick and a way to secure so you don't lose the gig.

For fish, I really like the spring loaded 'Automatic Fisherman' (also called yoyo's in some parts of the country). Set a few of those and dinner will be waiting for you.

All are neat gadgets that provide great help in catching us dinner. Not very heavy either.

Does anybody have any food gathering tools to add? Comments are welcome too.

RIKA
 

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A trotline.Think a looooong heavy line/cord tied to a tree/dock/pier on one end either also tied off or attatched to a float.Add baited hooks spaced out on the line & voila!
Fish,it's what's fer dinner!
 

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41mag said:
A trotline.Think a looooong heavy line/cord tied to a tree/dock/pier on one end either also tied off or attatched to a float.Add baited hooks spaced out on the line & voila!
Fish,it's what's fer dinner!
Don't forget weights and floats to keep it off of the bottom but deep enough to not get hit by boaters.
KJ
 

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> Frog gigs are perfect for those nights when you demand a gourmet meal. All it takes is a straight stick and a way to secure so you don't lose the gig.

I've caught more pig frogs and bullfrogs than I could count, but I still prefer the proper frog net to a gig unless they are all in the water and not on the edge of the bank. Granted, the gig is more useful in marsh and the net in swamps, but both can be used by a good frogger.

> For fish, I really like the spring loaded 'Automatic Fisherman' (also called yoyo's in some parts of the country). Set a few of those and dinner will be waiting for you.

Actually, don't waste your time. Good pole, limb, and/or bush lines are AS successful, cheaper, easier to replace, etc. Believe it or not, but there is actually a study in the SE Assoc. where they statistcally compared yo-yo lines to standard lines. They weren't any better. Sometimes they were worse.

Why leave out a cast net? First, that is the best way to get bait for those lines. Second, I've eaten MANY of cast net acquired meals.

KJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OOh! Hey KJUN, whats a proper frog net? Also, what about "Good pole, limb, and/or bush lines"? Do you just tie the line on a limb and bait it?

I've used cast nets to catch bait but never big enough to eat. Lousy technique maybe.

No expert here, I just want to learn.

Thanks

RIKA
 

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When I was a kid, we would put cinder blocks in the water for oysters to attach. We would only harvest a quarter of the blocks at a time so there would always be more.

My sister and I shared a pyramid crab trap and would usually bait it with a fish head. My grandmother would cook the crabs. She would dump them in the pot and they would go DING, Ding,...ding.

Some of my favorite times were flounder gigging at night. We used frog gigs and a gas lantern. The whole family would go and I would have so much fun.
 

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as long as there's LOTS of other food waiting, a vehicle to haul all the stuff in, and nobody trying to kill you, that's fine. All you can realistically CARRY, howevr, is a bit of line and a few treble hooks. Caching gill nets and trotlines,where you THINK you might end up,if shtf, is a good idea.

Dead wood usually floats ok to hold up a trotline, stones serve well as wt. so don't burden yourself when replacement items can be found anywhere.
 

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Was this a SHTF thread, oh no it wasn't was it! This was a hunting thread talking about trapping animals when doing something else. I like the idea. I have never used any of the mentioned traps, what is a Conibear trap?

I have used and still have some old style jaw traps, and have used box traps. I have also used long lines to catch fish, works well when you are hungry. Living in an urban area I don't get much chance to hunt except a few times a year at most when I travel to upstate NY. I may have to start trapping while on my hunting trips. It would be a good day to bag a deer with rifle or shotgun and also bag soem rabbits in a trap while I was out hunting for the deer. As for the fishing thing, I leave out lines on many trips, and it pays off.

Now if this were a SHTF thread I would have to agree with 223 fan not to overburden yourself, although I don't agree about using rocks for line weights for the obvious practical reasons: 1) They are a pain in the butt to tie onto the line so that they will not fall off, 2) they often abraid the line to the breaking point (no matter how smooth they appear). Of course having tried this already many times in my youth, I know about it. Fishing line (monofilament) makes a great survival tool, and can make a decent snare if a strong enough test is used, but I imagine other materials make better snares. Fish hooks can also add lots to a small game snare in catching capabilities. As for treble hooks - well it is much easier and safer to carry and use single point hooks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Glenn,

The Conibear is basically a flat trap with a spring on each side to provide power. Instead of catching the animal by its leg, the prey sticks its head through the trap and hits a little wire trigger. WAP! The trap fires and breaks animal's neck.

Here's a link to some photos. http://www.nwtrappers.com/catalog/traps/vt/vtc.asp

And a little article on the 110. http://www.buckshotscamp.com/Article-Using-110.htm

Prices on the traps vary widely so it pays to shop around for your traps and supplies.

HTH

RIKA
 

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Raider said:
OOh! Hey KJUN, whats a proper frog net? Also, what about "Good pole, limb, and/or bush lines"? Do you just tie the line on a limb and bait it?

I've used cast nets to catch bait but never big enough to eat. Lousy technique maybe.
Hey,

A frog net is a net on the end of a round pole about 10' long (longer if you can handle it). The diameter is just over the body length of the longest bullfrogs out there. (They get bigger than most people think, too.) The net is atleast 2' long, but I perfer one about 2.5' long. 3' is probably getting a little TOO long. There is a string tied to the REAR of the net and to the end of the pole you hold. Pull the string tight and the net gets tight, etc. Use the string to hold the net from sagging until you put it over the frog. (Of course, the net is attached to a metal ring on the end you don't hold.) Once the metal ring is around the frog and the net is over it, use the string to pull on the net. Frog jumps to the end of the net, and you let the string go slack. These leaves the frog hanging in the net which is sagging over the edge of the metal ring so there is no way for the frog to escape. You pull it back to you and get the frog out. If you are good, you can catch 4-5 frogs without empting the net. I don't recommend that, though, because you'll lose a bunch learning the trick. :)

Pole/limb/bush lines are pretty much the same thing, but people sometimes use them differently for slightly different methods. I don't care who calls what method what, so I'll just describe the methods I meant. Cut a straight pole. Young, straight willowtrees work good, but beavers like to cut them. Stick the pole out in the water at an angle so you can tie a string towards the top that hangs down in the water with a hook on it. No weighed is recommended unless there is a STRONG current. If there is a strong current, I'd suggest finding a new spot to fish. You DO NOW want enough slack so it is easy for the fish to swim AROUND the pole and get all tangled up. Works good for larger catfish and nongame fish. (If you want LARGE catfish, stick with deepwater trotlines.) If you tie this to a brach or a small limb (small limbs can act somewhat like a yo-yo, but don't work well at all for larger catfish), you can cut out the pole, BUT you are more limittedin where they go, wasps are a bigger concern, you are usually in shallower water, harder to check/bait/etc them, yadda yadda yadda.

All you need for any of the above methods are some string and hooks. Weights IF you want to fich anarea with lots of current, but I don't like those areas. I can NOT say that this is legal in all 50 states, so check your local regs.

I grew up throwing a cast net - my gradnmother made me my fist 3' net back before I started school. I love them, so I may be a little biased. In my states, it isillegal to keep game fish in castnets, but I can go out and catch bass, catfish, bream, "sac-a-lait" aka crappie, etc. almost every time when I try NOT to catch them, so I know I could get them if I tried. I have eaten a lot of nongame fish that are legal to catch in a castnet including mullet, bowfin, etc.

Let's thing of long-term survival gear near water that would be a big help made of string: trotlines, bush lines, cast nets, crab lines, crawfish dropnets, etc. I've got those now, but I wouldn't suggest people stock up with them. I would suggest people put a couple 1lb rolls of a few different size twine on the shelf and a couple of twine knitting needles. Then, you could knit any of these you needed AFTER it hit the fan (and you'd have more time than gear) on a as-needed basis. This is a time where raw materials might be better IMO than having JUST finished gear. Of course, leave a few finished products at the camp.

The monofiliment cast nets for beginners sold at Wal-Mart are good, but MUST be considered disposable. Us them readily (I do since they are cheap!), but keep some good nylon or cotton ones on hand for LONG-TERM quality - as long as you know how to patch a net, they can last you for a VERY long time.

KJ
 

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> The Conibear is

Never, never, NEVER, handle conibear kill or any leng-hold trap on a very cold morning with wet hands. Those things HURT when they slip and grab a finger or meaty part of your hand even though they don't usually do more than leave a small bruse. Having the COLD hands is why it probably hurts so bad.

I knew one guy that was learning how to put them out and got BOTH thumbs stuck in a leg-hold. He had to walk back to the boat and get help openning it up......lol. I would have just ripped it out, lost a lot of skin, and not admitted to anyone what happened.

KJ
 
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