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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I went to eat lunch with friends up at deer camp yesterday I saw my first solar oven. Ann, the lady who owned it was baking bread in it. She said that she has also cooked roasts, stews and almost anything else that you would cook in a normal oven. Not something to strap to your backpack but it seems like it would a neat addition for the fixed location site. Its light, efficient and runs on free fuel if you have a sunny day - and theres no cooking fire smoke to give your location away. Best of all, you can leave it virtually unattended while you tend to other duties.

Ann wrote down this website:
http://www.survivalunlimited.com/solaroven.htm

Just thought that someone might be interested.

RIKA
 

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Rika, Rika... Surely we've discussed this before...? :)


http://www.patriotnetwork.net/showthread.php?s=&threadid=7538&highlight=Solar+cooker

I recommend them HIGHLY. Zero fuel use, zero smoke given off; hard to beat for low-tech, low-profile cooking. My first one worked great; regularly hit 280-305 degrees, but got left open in a couple days' worth of rain (my son... :headbang: ), and got ruined. My second was an experiment in trying to make one more efficient and was a dismal failure; NEVER got above 220. God for almost nothing except pasteurizing. My third gets almost as hot as my first one did, and is what I have now.

Granted, they're limited in use, based on climate, etc, but even figure (worst case) they only work half the time. That means your year-supply of cooking fuel only needs to be used the other half of the time, and so will last TWO years instead of one. A three-month fuel supply now lasts six, etc. Heck of a return on investment.

For "fixed-position" situations, there are a lot of passive-energy options to consider, especially solar ones. Cooking, water purifiying, heat, etc.

I even once came across pictures of how a relatively well-off desert dweller actually used strategically-located fireboxes and ductwork to COOL his home. It was pretty slick and creative.
 

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yeah, few have the depth and breadth of knowledge that I demo all the time. Even AFTER they read all my stuff. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
223 fan said:
yeah, few have the depth and breadth of knowledge that I demo all the time. Even AFTER they read all my stuff. :)
So why don't you detail a useful gunsmithing project with photos and post it here.

RIKA
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
John in AR said:
Rika, Rika... Surely we've discussed this before...? :)

John, your cooker is just plain neat! I didn't realize that you were into such things. I checked the date of your post (Sept 2002) and not a peep from me so it must have been long before I came on board.

Thank you for posting the details of your experiments and the photos.

RIKA :)
 

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223 fan said:
yeah, few have the depth and breadth of knowledge that I demo all the time. Even AFTER they read all my stuff. :)
You're right. Most of the posters here seem to have a far better knowledge base than you and the ability to use logical arguments with far more ability. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
John from AR says: I even once came across pictures of how a relatively well-off desert dweller actually used strategically-located fireboxes and ductwork to COOL his home. It was pretty slick and creative.

Don't want you to go to any trouble but if you should think of where you saw that article/site please post a link. Anything that cools has my immediate attention. That would be awesome.

Thanks

RIKA
 

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I was wrong about the timing and having discussed it with you before; it was Prophit & some others back then. My mistake.

If you do a search on "solar cookers" on PN, we had several threads on them at one time or another.

As far as "being into" things, I'm "into" anything that may help me keep my wife & kids alive if the dominoes collapse. Guns, primitive cooking, same concept in my little head. :cool:


Anyway, on the "cooling with fire" thing...

I have no idea where I came across it, but it was almost certainly the result of some primitive survival or passive-solar search.


I’ll try to describe it. For simplicity's sake, this is a one-fire setup I’m describing, but in the house I saw, it was repeated multiple times, to multiply the effect.

Picture a two-story sand-brick “house” in the desert; a square-shaped place. In it, picture a duct that runs from the bottom floor, up through both floors, ending in a roof chimney. In this case, the duct work was encased in the walls themselves; just open chases in the masonry walls. In the roof chimney, just below the outlet for the top end of the duct work, there’s a firebox with an access door; think normal wood stove-type firebox, with a short open chimney on top. Main difference is that once the fire is lit and the access door is closed, the only source of air for the fire is through the ductwork below, like a snorkel feeding air to the fire. The fire itself was gas in this example, iirc, but could be any fuel source.

Air inlet for the firebox's ductwork on the first floor is on the inside of the house, near the ceiling on the “sun” side. As the fire draws air to feed itself, it must pull air from this inlet, INSIDE the house. Open vents in the wall on the opposite (shade) side of the house, near ground level, allow replacement air into the house. Being low on the shade side, means this air is the coolest available naturally, and due to the draft or ‘suction’ of the fire feeding itself, it creates a breeze through the house, with this cooler air.

Not enough cool breeze? Turn up the fire. Too much cold breeze? Turn the fire down. Weird, huh...?


Also, since the ductwork is located within the wall(s), it acts to cool the wall itself as the air flows through it. So in addition to the cool-air breeze you feel, it also provides the secondary benefit of a reduction in temperature in the huge thermal mass of the masonry walls themselves. The duct work was run in an "S" shape through the walls, to maximize the length of the pathway.

There was also discussion of improving efficiency, by having the incoming air flow around or thru a water vessel or water pipes, to provide an evaporative-cooling effect. (Evaporative coolers create a mold problem in a lot of old homes in the USA, but probably not a mold concern in the desert.)

Even without the firebox, just the vertically-run duct in the warm wall should create some amount of draft by convection, by virtue of being warmed by the sun.

Hope that makes some kind of sense…….
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Excellent description. I can visualize that. Now if I just had my own place. ( :D )

Thanks

RIKA
 

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Interesting, I had never given the idea much thought, thanks.
 

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real neat 'thought process' but what i 'chyhered' it would be a big /constant
blaze [coals] for the upstairs "draft" effect to kick in!

i don't know what i missed in the thread , but if you bend/snake your chimmeny you got PROBLEMS.

heck !i know people with $10k+ in solar panels[1 a U.A professer, way the hell! up on a mountain ridge,L.P.CUSTOMER]

try getting ice from fire in my R.V. refridgerator when it's out of PROPANE!


[deleted] thanks.
 

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Brass, what you seem to have missed is that the fire is at the TOP of the chimney, and it has to pull it's air from the BOTTOM of the chimney to feed itself, clooing the house through convection.

A less radical example is the old Florida houses. It's a square house with high ceilings, highest point in the center. There's louvers in the top center so you can open it to the sky, and the rising air and shape of the house causes a venturi effect, making a constant breeze through the house.

The "modern" houses that they're building now just become furnaces.
 

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Garand said:
Interesting, I had never given the idea much thought, thanks.

I somehow doubt it's a setup you'd run into very often in Canada.... :cool:
 

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once again MAG88

has LINED ME OUT!


SORRY, MY EVELEN WOODHEAD speed reading, isn't what it used to be!



and i'm starting to get like my old dog 'jack' when i drink, i growl at things.


sorry for being a knuckle head at times!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
brass hammer said:
sorry for being a knuckle head at times!

We love you anyway Brass. Some people call me a knuckle head too.

RIKA :)
 
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