Firearm Forums - Arms Locker banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am still feeling out the forum and I was just curious as to who has actual sniper, and or combat experience.
This is not to start any flaming, I was just curious because of all the SHTF and combat talk that goes on here.
I will start;
U.S. Army Sniper
7th Infantry Division
1982-1988
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,759 Posts
Joined the Canadian Army at age 17 in 1973. Spent 1973 until 1980 as a member of 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia's Light Infantry. Trained in places from California to Alaska, from British Columbia To the Middle East (twice). Infantry qualifications as Driver wheeled, Driver Tracked, Machine Gunner, Combat signaller,Anti Tank Gunner, Mortarman. Remustered to Ammunition Technician with specialties in EOD and Chemical munitions. I spent 4 years on an Explosive Ordnance Disposal team and a further 2 years on a Chemical EOD Team disposing of Canada's stock of Mustard & Nerve Agent. Was seconded to British Army Training Unit Suffield in Canada for 4 years, supplying 450 tonnes of munitions to each of 6 battlegroups a year. Finished my military career after 28 years in uniform as a Troop Warrant of a Combat Service Support (CSS) Troop in a Squadron of an Armoured Regiment.

I have 2 beautiful daughters, the oldest gave birth to my 1st grand-daughter in December of 2002. Currently I'm employed as a Explosive/Chemical Technician at a Defence Research facility. Gawd, life is great. I generally spend 5 days a week blowing stuff up! A scientist comes up with a concept, we build it and the detonate it. They extract the data. As well we train First Responders from around North America.

As for shooting, I bought my first rifle in 1975 and started shooting competition in 1986. I jumped in with both feet, in '86-90 I was competing in IPSC, Service Rifle Competition, Service Sniper Competition, and any 3 gun match I could find! I was the Chief Instructor/Coach/Shooter on the Armoured Reg'ts Shooting team. As a result of a posting in late 1990, I quit long distance travelling for Service condition matches in '92 and kept on with IPSC. Becoming disgruntled with the growing "attitude" in IPSC in '96, I was asked to come out and help RO a Cowboy Action Match. I was hooked. These days, I shoot Action pistol, 2 gun matches, 3 gun matches and cowboy Action.

My best shot while in uniform was with an M8C .50 cal Spotting Rifle on top of the 106mm. I hit a full sized silouette (Figure 11) target at 2,200 yds with the second shot. Considering that the tracer on that particular round burns out at 1,750 yds I consider myself very lucky.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,805 Posts
I served in the US Army for five years. During the Korean War I was an artillery officer and was a forward observer with several infantry rifle companies of the 7th Infantry Division. I was not a smiper by MOS, but did some sniping with a 1903A4 Springfield from time to time,
During the last three months I was in Korea I was an air strike director with the 6147th Tactical Air Control Group flying 104 combat missions.
After returning to CONUS I took special training and became a Nuclear Weapons and Guided Missiles Officer and served in that capacity until I left the Army and rewturned to civilian life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,648 Posts
Not a sniper, though I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express once...

:devil:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
No military. Females can't do the fun stuff like being a sniper.

RIKA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,815 Posts
Raider said:
No military. Females can't do the fun stuff like being a sniper.

RIKA
RIKA, they're doing it now ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
Interesting Bill. Got a link?

RIKA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,759 Posts
US Air Forces has female snipers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
Aslan said:
Not a sniper, though I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express once...

:devil:
Gosh I wish I'd have said that. Sorry not a sniper, 4yrs in the Navy and player with weapons all my life if that counts for anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,117 Posts
Nobody got special training as a sniper for WW2, some just handled it rather well. Some guys can look at a man and shoot him in the face, and others can't. Some can sit like a statue by a chuck hole for hours, waiting with a spear. most can't. I can. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,903 Posts
Andy... The fact that you would post this shows that you would die a hungy, miserable death in the wilderness. Wasting your time sitting over a woodchucks den is 3 hours you could have been using to set about 10 traps over 10 holes, that would have done the work for you. 1 woodchuck is not going to sustain you, and anyway, the idea that you can stand still, arm raised and extended, with the body angled and tensed, for anything over 5 minutes is laughable. I doubt I could, and Im in good shape.

Hold your arms out fully extended for 2 minutes. you'll see what Im talking about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
andy said:
Nobody got special training as a sniper for WW2, some just handled it rather well. Some guys can look at a man and shoot him in the face, and others can't. Some can sit like a statue by a chuck hole for hours, waiting with a spear. most can't. I can. :)
Ha, ha, ha, ha, choke, cough, burp, I think I may have hurt myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,759 Posts
The USAF even has FEMALE snipers....


March is the traditional month for celebrating women's history. April 2001, however, is when 19-year-old Jennifer Donaldson made some history of her own.

She was nicknamed "G.I. Jane" at Camp Robinson in central Arkansas, near Little Rock. That's where the senior airman from the Illinois Air National Guard became the first woman to complete the only U.S. military sniper school open to females. That's where she did for real what Demi Moore portrayed in the 1997 movie about training Navy SEALS.

Technically, Donaldson and seven men on April 14, the Saturday before Easter, graduated from the first counter-sniper program for Air Guard security force personnel conducted by the eight-year-old National Guard Sniper School. It was the first program of its kind for any U.S. Air Force component.
"The Air Force has been the only ground combat force in this country that does not employ snipers and counter-snipers," explained Army Guard Sgt. 1st Class Ben Dolan, a former Marine sniper and the school's chief instructor.

That made Donaldson, a patrol person from the Air Guard's 183rd Fighter Wing in Springfield, Ill., the pilot woman student for the National Guard's pilot training program for security people charged with protecting air bases and airplanes.

"I've admired policemen since I was a little kid," explained the trim Donaldson, who stands 5-foot-9 and weighs 125 pounds, while wearily picking at her dinner following a long, hot Sunday of outdoor training. "I want to get as much training as I can get. This sounded interesting."

She and her partner, special operations Staff Sgt. Frank Tallman from Kentucky, had found four of five points and were the first team to complete and pass a 2.7-mile land navigation course through thick woods that day. She was steeling herself to do another three-hour course that night.

"I had no idea it would be this hard," said Donaldson after her first week. "I've been in the Guard for a year. I've done basic training and tech school. But I've never seen this kind of physical training. Some of us had to get fit while we were here.

"Yesterday I wanted to go home," she added. "I was so stressed out, and I had no confidence at all."

Donaldson was considerably more upbeat five days later, the day before graduation, after the two tough weeks of training were behind her.

"It's a relief," she said on Good Friday. "I feel that I have really accomplished something. I stuck with it because I wanted to prove to myself I could do it."

The 14 straight days of strenuous physical and mental training is grounded in the idea that the best way to detect a sniper is with another sniper, said Dolan. The counter-sniper students were trained to think like and become snipers -- to deliberately locate and kill another human being without remorse.

Two Air Guard men who have gone to war for this country took top honors. Nebraska Senior Airman John Swanson, a Marine in Southwest Asia during Operation Desert Storm, was the distinguished honor graduate. Tallman, a former Army Ranger who jumped into Panama in December 1989 to help kick off Just Cause against Manuel Noriega, was named Top Gun as the best shooter.

Detecting practice targets as small as a pencil, sketching structures where enemy snipers could be concealed, and memorizing minute details about an enemy unit's size, uniforms and equipment were part of the drill for the students who spent as much time on their stomachs as they did on their feet.

Donaldson was eligible to attend the school because women belong to Air Guard and Air Force security forces, Dolan explained.

That is not the case in the Army and the Marines because snipers are part of those infantry forces, and women can't be in the infantry. Dolan, however, maintains that more women should be trained as snipers.

"Frankly, women are better suited mentally for this job than most men," said Dolan who has learned the sniper craft from the Marines and from the Army and who saw duty as a Marine sniper 10 years ago during the Persian Gulf War.

"A woman is best suited to counter a woman sniper," he added. "That's important because over 50 percent of the countries that have been considered hostile to the United States, including North Vietnam and North Korea, have used women snipers.

"Women can shoot better, by and large, and they're easier to train because they don't have the inflated egos that a lot of men bring to these programs," Dolan said. "Women will ask for help if they need it, and they will tell you what they think."

Dolan has designed the counter-sniper program for Air Guard security people, and he has no reservations about training women who can handle the 15-hour days of running and shooting and camouflage lessons in the woods.

The students had to complete a two-day and night field training exercise at the Arkansas National Guard's Fort Chaffee before they graduated.

"The same standards apply to men and women," Dolan insisted. "This course is designed to test their physical limits and their emotional balance."
Despite Donaldson's concerns, Dolan said, the sniper school's first woman student shot well with her scope-mounted, high-power rifle on the range and was an above average student.

The tests took many forms, Donaldson related. All eight got "smoked" if one made a mistake. They all did grass drills and pushups, low crawled through a large mud puddle, and hung upside down while hugging a tree with their arms and legs because one of them did not handle a rifle properly. No one made that mistake again.
"They tried to teach you to deal with stress," related Donaldson. "I believe it worked. And I feel much better about all of this now that it's over."




First woman graduates from Sniper School-



Senior Airman Jennifer Donaldson -USAF Photo



Senior Airman Jennifer Donaldson from the Illinois Air National Guard has become the first woman to be trained at the only U.S. military sniper school open to females. She was graduated April 14, 2001 from the National Guard Sniper School's first countersniper course for Air Guard security force personnel.

She was nicknamed "G.I. Jane" at Camp - Robinson in central Arkansas, near Little Rock. That's where the senior airman from the Illinois Air National Guard became the first woman to complete the only U.S. military sniper school open to females.

Donaldson and seven men graduated April 14 from the first countersniper program for Air Guard security force personnel conducted by the 8-year-old National Guard Sniper School. It was the first program of its kind for any U.S. Air Force component. "The Air Force has been the only ground combat force in this country that does not employ snipers and countersnipers," said Army Guard Sgt. 1st Class Ben Dolan, a former Marine sniper and the school's chief instructor.

Completing the course made Donaldson, a security forces specialist from the Air National Guard's 183rd Fighter Wing in Springfield, Ill., the first woman student for the National Guard's pilot training program for security people charged with protecting air bases and airplanes. "I've admired policemen since I was a little kid," Donaldson said. "I want to get as much training as I can get. This sounded interesting."

She and her partner, Staff Sgt. Frank Tallman from Kentucky, were the first team to complete and pass a 2.7-mile land navigation course through thick woods that day. She was steeling herself to do another three-hour course that night.

"I had no idea it would be this hard," said Donaldson after her first week. "I've been in the Guard for a year. I've done basic training and tech school. But I've never seen this kind of physical training. Some of us had to get fit while we were here.

The 14 straight days of strenuous physical and mental training is grounded in the idea that the best way to detect a sniper is with another sniper, said Dolan. Detecting practice targets as small as a pencil, sketching structures where enemy snipers could be concealed, and memorizing minute details about an enemy unit's size, uniforms and equipment were part of the drill for the students who spent as much time on their stomachs as they did on their feet.

Donaldson was eligible to attend the school because women belong to Air Guard and Air Force security forces, Dolan explained. That is not the case in the Army and the Marines because snipers are part of those infantry forces, and women cannot be in the infantry. Dolan, however, maintains that more women should be trained as snipers.

"Frankly, women are better suited mentally for this job than most men," said Dolan who has learned the sniper craft from the Marines and from the Army and who saw duty as a Marine sniper 10 years ago during the Persian Gulf War. "A woman is best suited to counter a woman sniper," he added. "That's important because more than 50 percent of the countries that have been considered hostile to the United States, including North Vietnam and North Korea, have used women snipers.

"Women can shoot better, by and large, and they're easier to train because they don't have the inflated egos that a lot of men bring to these programs," Dolan said. "Women will ask for help if they need it, and they will tell you what they think." Dolan has designed the countersniper program for Air National Guard security people, and he has no reservations about training women who can handle the 15-hour days of running and shooting and camouflage lessons in the woods.

The students had to complete a two-day and night field training exercise at the Arkansas National Guard's Fort Chaffee before they graduated. "The same standards apply to men and women," Dolan insisted. "This course is designed to test their physical limits and their emotional balance." Despite Donaldson's concerns, Dolan said, the sniper school's first woman student shot well with her scope-mounted, high-power rifle on the range and was an above average student.
Source: USAF Press Release
http://userpages.aug.com/captbarb/sniper.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,759 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,382 Posts
eric cartman said:
I am still feeling out the forum and I was just curious as to who has actual sniper, and or combat experience.
This is not to start any flaming, I was just curious because of all the SHTF and combat talk that goes on here.
I will start;
U.S. Army Sniper
7th Infantry Division
1982-1988
Not a sniper but I've gone through several international schools for sniper training. I've also gone through a couple of federal programs for it as well.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
397 Posts
Not a sniper by trade.

Advisor to ARVN Ranger unit, '64, '65.

2 tours with LRRP companies. (Forerunner of 75th RIR).

Short stint as a DI. That was worse than combat - nothing more dangerous than a 'cruit with a rifle.

DC
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
733 Posts
Not a sniper, never been in a gunfight (and hope to keep it that way).
4 Years Army, last 11 years as Air National Guard full timer. Korea twice in early 90's, Europe 3 times for Balkans, lost track of times in Mideast. During Iraqi Freedom I was a driver / escort as an additional duty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I appreciate the responses, I was cureous.
Thanks to all the vets who have faithfuly served their countries!
Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Garand said:
Joined the Canadian Army at age 17 in 1973. Spent 1973 until 1980 as a member of 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia's Light Infantry. Trained in places from California to Alaska, from British Columbia To the Middle East (twice). Infantry qualifications as Driver wheeled, Driver Tracked, Machine Gunner, Combat signaller,Anti Tank Gunner, Mortarman. Remustered to Ammunition Technician with specialties in EOD and Chemical munitions. I spent 4 years on an Explosive Ordnance Disposal team and a further 2 years on a Chemical EOD Team disposing of Canada's stock of Mustard & Nerve Agent. Was seconded to British Army Training Unit Suffield in Canada for 4 years, supplying 450 tonnes of munitions to each of 6 battlegroups a year. Finished my military career after 28 years in uniform as a Troop Warrant of a Combat Service Support (CSS) Troop in a Squadron of an Armoured Regiment.

I have 2 beautiful daughters, the oldest gave birth to my 1st grand-daughter in December of 2002. Currently I'm employed as a Explosive/Chemical Technician at a Defence Research facility. Gawd, life is great. I generally spend 5 days a week blowing stuff up! A scientist comes up with a concept, we build it and the detonate it. They extract the data. As well we train First Responders from around North America.

As for shooting, I bought my first rifle in 1975 and started shooting competition in 1986. I jumped in with both feet, in '86-90 I was competing in IPSC, Service Rifle Competition, Service Sniper Competition, and any 3 gun match I could find! I was the Chief Instructor/Coach/Shooter on the Armoured Reg'ts Shooting team. As a result of a posting in late 1990, I quit long distance travelling for Service condition matches in '92 and kept on with IPSC. Becoming disgruntled with the growing "attitude" in IPSC in '96, I was asked to come out and help RO a Cowboy Action Match. I was hooked. These days, I shoot Action pistol, 2 gun matches, 3 gun matches and cowboy Action.

My best shot while in uniform was with an M8C .50 cal Spotting Rifle on top of the 106mm. I hit a full sized silouette (Figure 11) target at 2,200 yds with the second shot. Considering that the tracer on that particular round burns out at 1,750 yds I consider myself very lucky.
Wow!!!
That is an impressive resume!!!!!
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top