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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now, I like to shoot, guess everyone here does. Been that way since I was three. I started to get serious about it, 30 years ago, while in the Navy.
I still like to load all the mags and just blow the crap out of everything--what a great release!
But, as I have made a considerable investment in these things I enjoy using and learning about, I have grown serious about absorbing the subtleties of every aspect of the process.
For instance, my SAR 1 developed a trigger slap that was not conducive to me shooting my best with it. So, I learned what I neede to know to acquire and install a FCG that fixed the problem and was rewarded with a light, crisp, repeatable trigger that is now far superior to that of my Bushmaster AK A3. Now the Bushy cost three times what the AK cost, not counting the go-fast goodies I have added, but it's trigger release (something I consider crucial in a rifle) is sub-par compared to that of my hairy-assed Kalashnikov.
When you get serious you start to notice, absorb, and contemplate every aspect of the evolution in which you are occupied.
For instance, I have learned that my Bushmaster's factory trigger has a very slight, almost imperceptible click, dink, or gritty feel just before release. It's a very small thing and would never be noticed if I were just dumping mags down-range.
But, when you get down to putting the round into a precisely aimed-for place, it's character is unnerving.. I will soon spend the time and effort to replace this trigger with one that is non-adjustable, but smooooooth. I subscribe to Murphy and his law which says, the screw on a nice adjustable trigger will become "un-adjusted" when I need it not too, so I will use a product that results in a smooth release, but is not a "Kenworth-of-triggers" because this is a hard lesson I have learned. This awareness of subtleties has become somewhat Zen-like, as I train, practice and generally do the routine of mastering my craft.
All this rambling is to ask the question, what small things that we notice as we slow down and absorb the small lessons, have we assimilated to contribute to the whole, the BIG picture?
SatCong
 

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I agree a smooth, light but reliable trigger is important.

Another one is keeping iron sights from getting too shiny and light reflective; front sights in particular.

Most here probably know this but it is not mentioned much.
At the wrong time that can block out your view of the target.

I like to put a matte finish on all of my front sights if possible and use sight blackner or cold blue such as Oxpho-Blue to touch them up.
 

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I've noticed that since taking the time to reload ammo, I'm a lot more careful in taking each shot. Whereas before, when just making noise with surplus ammo, I didn't really notice how much difference a good trigger or good sights make. More recently I've noticed the trigger on my 91/30 has a real mushy trigger, while the M44 probably has the nicest trigger of any rifle I have. Very little creep and a nice, suprise break. Couldn't believe it, especially out of a $70 RUSSIAN rifle. . .I also learned that the peep sights on my Enfields are head and shoulders above the tangential style sights.

I also learned that you can not shoot with a scope for a long time and get right back into it without much trouble, but shooting with irons seems to ba a bit more of a perishable skill.
 

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I try to take time to reason things out but realize that I'm running pretty fast right now. Need to slow down but its hard when there are so many new things to learn.

SatCong, what kind of non-adjustable trigger are you thinking of for your Bushy?

RIKA
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Rock River unit Andy mentioned seems to be calling to me, but my initial research has been cursory, so far. Any suggestions? I may just initially try to smooth the components that are native to the weapon. A little light dremel work may solve my prob.
SatCong
 
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