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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How many of us have a SURVIVAL WATCH?

I have been looking for just such an animal for quiet some time.

I wanted a watch that could pick up the time signal from the Atomic Clock, located in the national standards center, at Fort carson, CO.

I wanted a watch that didn't depend on replacable batteries.

I found it today, and the price was great. The watch is a CASIO G-SHOCK watch, with a solar cell charging feature. The watch cost me $102.00 plus tax and license.

This watch has a seperate display window for the battery charge condition. Actually, this multifunction watch, has a minature computer chip in it.

The watch has a soft green dial illumination, at the push of a button

This watch has a stainless case, and it has a polished/brushed stainless/aluminum band. It's big and it's clunky. But it will do the job.the G-SHOCK is one of Casio's strongest watchs.
 

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Alas no, I have a cheap $32.00 Casio that I found useful in field use. I gave no consideration to survival use when I bought it.
 

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G Shocks are my favorite, hands down. Haven't had an opportunity to check out the solar models... the one that I got as a gift many years ago is still running strong and has been through a gang load of beatings.

cheers
 

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Hmm, if SHTF, why would you need to know what time it is? Yeah I would like to have a neat gadget like that myself (have two atomic clocks over in the animal buildings, but every other clock I have has a different time on it), but honestly, if I was out in the sticks after SHTF, I am probably only going to be interested in two times: (1) sunrise, and (2) sunset. If I am anywhere near a coastal area, the timing of the tides would probably become important as well.

So what do you see that I don't?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What is a survival watch good for?

Rich Z said:
Hmm, if SHTF, why would you need to know what time it is? Yeah I would like to have a neat gadget like that myself (have two atomic clocks over in the animal buildings, but every other clock I have has a different time on it), but honestly, if I was out in the sticks after SHTF, I am probably only going to be interested in two times: (1) sunrise, and (2) sunset. If I am anywhere near a coastal area, the timing of the tides would probably become important as well.

So what do you see that I don't?
I have many friends living in Northern Idaho, Western Montana and Eastern Washington state. We all like to back country hike and travel. Each year we pick a rendezvous point and meet. Next year it will be the Pacific Crest Trail, on horse back, from Canada to a midpoint in Oregon. We will need our watches to time ourselves to the rendezvous point. We communicate by Amateur Radio.

If you pick a rendezvous point, and a time to meet, you need a watch. My grandfather, who was a trapper and a buffalo hunter in the mid to late 1800's, always made sure to impress me with having a reliable watch. I still have his old railroad "Super" to this day.

If you are doing field excercises, or tactical exercises, that need precision timing. The watch tells you when to start, and when to execute the exercise. The watch will tell you if you are behind, ahead or on schedule.

If you time yourself between two known points on a map, you can give a good estimate, of how long it will take you to cover a given amount of ground, in the area that you are traveling through. There are many other ways a watch, would benefit a traveler, or a survivalist.
 

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Night sentry duties, do you want to do a 2 hour watch, or do you want to do a dawn to dusk watch. Equal time in doing sentry duties ensure that everyone in you group gets the same amount of rest. That way , you don't have one or 2 individuals dragging their can as they have done more duty than others. Some watches show water depth in meters and are waterproof, have an alarm so you can wake up and get into position 30 minutes before first light, some contain a magnetic compass.

If your operating in the desert, you can plan your rest periods during the hottest part of the day. You can use your watch to estimate the distance away of gunshots that you hear. If your party is caught in an avalanche, by 60 minutes after the incident you still have a 55% chance of rescueing your group. How do you ensure that an unknown source of water has been properly boiled till its drinkable, unless you do it for 3 minutes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Garand said:
Night sentry duties, do you want to do a 2 hour watch, or do you want to do a dawn to dusk watch. Equal time in doing sentry duties ensure that everyone in you group gets the same amount of rest. That way , you don't have one or 2 individuals dragging their can as they have done more duty than others. Some watches show water depth in meters and are waterproof, have an alarm so you can wake up and get into position 30 minutes before first light, some contain a magnetic compass.

If your operating in the desert, you can plan your rest periods during the hottest part of the day. You can use your watch to estimate the distance away of gunshots that you hear. If your party is caught in an avalanche, by 60 minutes after the incident you still have a 55% chance of rescueing your group. How do you ensure that an unknown source of water has been properly boiled till its drinkable, unless you do it for 3 minutes?
Garand sounds like an expert to me ... !
 

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Well I guess that makes sense if you all have the same watch in a community environment after SHTF. I was looking at this from the standpoint of the balloon going up, a bunch of people are dead, and I'm heading out on a "Daniel Boone".

Still, I guess I would feel more comfortable with an old fashion spring action wind-up watch.

How long does that battery in the G-Shock hold a charge between sunshine charge-ups?

The watch cost me $102.00 plus tax and license.
License?
 

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Stillwater said:
The watch cost me $102.00 plus tax and license.

License?What kind of license do u need for a watch?
 

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You need a rugged, dependable, and precise survival watch to:

1) play with in meetings when you get bored,

2) not miss South Park,

3) meet your friends at the restaurant.

;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Rich Z said:
Well I guess that makes sense if you all have the same watch in a community environment after SHTF. I was looking at this from the standpoint of the balloon going up, a bunch of people are dead, and I'm heading out on a "Daniel Boone".

Still, I guess I would feel more comfortable with an old fashion spring action wind-up watch.
I would like to have a Seiko Kinetic watch too. The Seido Kinetic has a generator that charges the watches battery as you wear it.

This watch, the Casio, model 2638, resets itself four times a day, as it listens for the time signal from the Atomic Clock, in Fort Collins, CO. I like that accuracy.

How long does that battery in the G-Shock hold a charge between sunshine charge-ups?
The manual says, if the watch is functioning eighteen hours a day, and in the sleep mode for four hours a day, a charged battery will last six months, without a recharge. Not too bad.

License is a figure of speech.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
GBullet said:
You need a rugged, dependable, and precise survival watch to:

1) play with in meetings when you get bored,

2) not miss South Park,

3) meet your friends at the restaurant.

;)
GB:
At which restaurant, do you want to meet, when the Fit, Hits The Shan? :)
 

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I have two "survival watches". My daily wear watch is a Luminox while my real SHTF watch is a Rolex Sea Dweller with the perpetual motion winding.

I'm kinda old fashioned when it comes to watches.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
There is nothing shabby about the Rolex Sea Dweller. I don't have any experience with the Luminox though.
 

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I have a Casio Sun watch. Needs no batteries and keeps excellent time even after 3 years. Its analog so I can use it for a compass too.

RIKA
 

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Watches are a fetish of mine…)

Don’t forget an analog watch will also serve as a crude compass. In the northern hemisphere, point the hour hand at the sun, and the 12 o’clock marker will point pretty much due south. A watch could also be handy when hiding (in your spider hole..?), so you can “know” it’s been 30 minutes since the last patrol went by, and not just guess at it.


Luminox’s are great watches; waterproof from anywhere from 100-200 meters, depending on model, and probably as tough as a G-shock. Don’t know if Luminox makes any ‘gadget’ watches with alarms, etc. Mine’s just an analog 200 meter with the date window. One thing that Luminox does absolutely better than any other brand is the night illumination. They use tritium inserts, rather than luminescent paint, so they’re as bright and consistent as a night-sight on a gun. Any other ‘glowing’ analog watch gradually dims thru the night; a Luminox doesn’t. I was told by a jewelry store manager that tritium watches aren’t allowed into the states due to some govt regulation, but Luminox has some kind of special dispensation due to being a government supplier. Don’t know if it’s true or not; just what I’ve been told.

I have an old G-shock, but I just don’t like digital watches, and I just about hate black plastic or rubber watches. It’s tough as a tank, but it’s a vanity thing with me, I guess. If I were living in the woods, it would definitely be a very good choice. I’ve seen the new solar/atomic G-shocks in the stores, but haven’t looked at them close. They seem like a heck of a good idea. Toughness, accuracy, and low (zero?) maintenance all in one.

Those last two (higher accuracy and lower maintenance) are hard to combine in a watch; one usually comes at the expense of the other. Reduced “maintenance” (battery dependency, etc) can be had with a wind-up or self-winding watch, but those are the least accurate kind. Even an “officially-certified” stamp on a Rolex, Omega, higher-end TAG, etc, is just a certification by the Swiss govt that the mechanism’s accurate to within 2 ½ minutes a month. “OK” accuracy, but that slippage compounds over time. I have a relatively expensive TAG that’s automatic, but I rarely wear it anymore except for dress occasions. It gains right at 2 minutes a month, and I just don’t like being “off” by that much; I want my watch to tell me what time it is, not “about” what time it is.

A quartz analog watch is much more accurate than a wind-up or automatic, and a quartz digital watch is even more accurate still, but you’re faced with the battery (maintenance) issue.

The Seiko “Kinetic” was the first I found that that solved the problem in an analog watch, and now with the solar analog watches being more common (and solar digital being even more common) there are a lot more options. FWIW, the Kinetic doesn’t have a battery per se, the movement actually charges a capacitor rather than a battery. For a long-term shtf thing, this could be even better, as batteries eventually wear out and won’t charge. A capacitor will last decades.

Citizen also makes solar watches, but I don’t know if they have any digital or not. The “ECO” series, iirc.

My usual watch is an Omega Seamaster Professional. Waterproof to 1,000 feet, better illumination (larger dots) than any watch I have except for the Luminox, and (weird to say), but “comfortable”. My only concession to function rather than “niceness” on it was that I bought the quartz one, rather than the self-winding one, as it’s substantially more accurate; but that does raise the maintenance level, needing a new battery every few years. So I don’t get the nifty “sweep” look with the second hand that my TAG (or a Rolex) has, but it’s accurate to within 4 seconds a month, rather than 150 seconds a month. Two & a half minutes “wrong” may not sound like much, but when comparing that 150 seconds to the 4 or 5 seconds of a quartz analog watch or the 1-2 seconds of a quartz digital, the difference it substantial to say the least. And the 2 ½ minutes a month is for very high-end mechanical watches, most mechanical watches are substantially more sloppy than that; more like 4-5 minutes (300 seconds) a month.

To recommend based on objectivity rather than preference, the “best” choices would probably be the G-shock digital or a Luminox analog. Still have the battery limitations to consider with the Luminox; so the solar version of the G-shock may be just about “perfect” from a purely functional point of view, but I still hate digital watches.

For choosing a watch for just objective functionality, ask yourself what you’d want on your wrist if you were shipping out to Iraq or Afghanistan tomorrow. The answer to that should lend some insight to what’s important in a watch to you. I’d be wearing the Luminox, and have the G-shock packed away as a spare. (If you wear a Luminox into a combat zone, I’d consider a watchband that covers the face for night-time use. They really are that bright at night.)
 

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Oops, Rika beat me to the "compass" thing while I was typing... :)

So I may as well add this. Left to right: Omega, TAG, Luminox, Wittnauer, Seiko
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
John in AR, (just so there are no ID mistakes from any other john):

You have managed to teach me something about watches. particularly the Seiko Kinetic. The Seiko Kinetic is going to be my next watch.

I really don't have any high end watches now, because I have 7 Seiko Chronographs. Just because I am a Watch Freak, just like you are.

Around 1963, I bought a Breitling Navtimer, for 175 dollars. It was the most fragile watch a person could buy. After the eighth or tenth time I had it repaired I put it away in a drawer, and didn't pay any attention to it for twenty-five years.

I got it out one day and wore it to a Great Western gun show. There was a watch trader there. He spotted it on my wrist and offered to buy it. I sold that watch to him for $1500.00 and a good Seiko gold (real gold) dress watch.

Incidentially the Casio G-shock I bought, doesn't have any rubber or resin parts on it this watch is mostly a combination of brushed and polished stainless.
 

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Incidentially the Casio G-shock I bought, doesn't have any rubber or resin parts on it this watch is mostly a combination of brushed and polished stainless.

Hmmm... Although a digital, I may have to go look at one of those. :dgrin:
 

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John in AR said:
Don’t forget an analog watch will also serve as a crude compass. In the northern hemisphere, point the hour hand at the sun, and the 12 o’clock marker will point pretty much due south.
Actually, due South is about halfway between the hour hand and the 12 o'clock marker, with a 12 hour watch face.

DC
 
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