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I found a 50 cal tennesse long rifle in a pawn shap a few days ago that i am thinking of buying and was wondering what the diffrence is between it and a kentucky long rifle is. alos do youall think $225 is a good price it is a kit gun from dixie gun workes and is in verry good shape and comes with a pouder horn,possobles bag and every thing i need to shoot it execpt for pouder.
 

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well, BULL420! i personally myself don't see it as all that 'good' of a 'deal'
GRANTED! i don't know what the 'kits' are sellin' for these days[79-99 dollars, last 'I' checked] as i drug home a mossburg 500a .12ga. [2] nights ago for $250 ,,but it had the [6] round side-saddle,tac-light all ready mounted!
young man!,,, pay heed to the words of the wizend[although,smart by NO MEANS] :dgrin:

half of the world is out to FUCK-OVER THE OTHER HALF.[look out LADIES]
if you want it badly enough to HUNT WITH, then by all means[hook/crook]
obtain it,,,and BE HAPPY!,,,YET RETAIN THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE 'VALUE'
OF YOUR MONEY! :wavey:
 

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$225 for the rifle, powder horn and possibles bag is a pretty good price if the guy really did a really good job of putting the rifle together. The only real diff I know of between the Tenn rifle and the Kentucky (and Pennsylvania) rifle is that the last 2 were just a little prettier/fancier in the fittings.

Luck

RIKA
 

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I don't know much about the history of these guns, but weren't the "pennsylvania", "kentucy", "tennessee", etc rifles the same basic pattens with just some local differences that are actually relatively minor?

As for the price, since you know it's a DGW gun, check out how much the kits go for, figure how much time, sweat and pain in the sphincter it would be for you to put toggether then buy or make all the accoutrements, and see if it's worth it to you to buy the assembled rifle or not. Beauty and value are in the eye of the beer holder.
 

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If it's a DGW's Tennessee Mountain Rifle kit build, and the guy hasn't obviously loused it up, buy it tomorrow. DGW lists that kit @ $545. The parts alone are probably worth (not counting the stock) 300-400 bucks. DGW uses good quality parts, not the junk you see in cheaper kits. Most people assume that all black powder parts are equal but that is far from the truth.

Without pics it's hard to comment on the horn or the bag. Most reproduction, factory made bags are in the 30-60 dollar range and production horns can run anywhere from $20-50 bucks. If the bag/horn look hand made too then it really is a steal. I charge anywhere from 50 to 100 for a powderhorn, undecorated. But they are authentic. You don't even want to know what a good handmade hunting bag can run.

When you get the horn take the stopper off and blow into it. If it leaks air you will need to seal it before you fill it full of powder. Nothing is worse than filling a BP rifle with damp powder while you are out hunting.

The whole Tennessee/Kentucky thing is a moot point. Both are rifles of fantasy anyways. The general style was settled on somewhere around 1950. You have to understand that black powder rifles were still being made by families in the Appalachians up into the early part of the 1900's. Each generation changed a little here or there and what we think of as "southern mountain rifles" today is not exactly what a man wandering into "Can-tuk-ee" would have been carrying in 1765. You can call it a Tennessee OR a Kentucky rifle, DGW has just named it Tenn. because they thought it would sell better with that name......that's the hard facts.

Now, as Rika said...that doesn't neccessarily apply to Pennsylvania rifles. Most of those are finished a lot finer than what we think of as a Kentucky rifle today. Each school built their rifles in a different style. You could tell where a rifle was made by the shape of it.



Both of the above are "Pennsylvania" rifles. The top one is a "Berks County" gun (my personal favorites) and the bottom is a "Lancaster". Rifles built in PA usually followed the "school" of the particuliar area. In WV/KY/TN all bets were off. Each maker put together what he could from parts that he had laying around or how he cared to build it. There wasn't the strongly structured apprenticeship that PA had. That's why it's so hard to nail down a "general mountain rifle".

That's more than you asked, but as I said before.........I get long winded when people want to talk muzzleloaders.

Short answer.......buy it.
 

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Flinter, I like it when you get long winded because I love the smokepoles too. Both are really nice rifles but that Lancaster is a beauty, isn't it?

Thanks

RIKA :)
 

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WOW! flinter, i'm glad YOU posted, as your RIFLES is TRULY A THING OF BEAUTY!,,,although,i don't regret my reply to B420 ! i'm thinkin' he would have deemed the transaction a 'no-brainer' @$225 on your RIFLES!
my black-powder 'resume is pistol-ball wheelers[i've a repo .44 revolving carbine on the mantle]
thanks for laying some 'hard-cards' on the table.
 

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I think Flinter is a rotten bastard as he's now gotten me "jonesing" for a new (old?) flintlock to keep my percussions company.

Next you damn people will have me casting my own bullets.

:dgrin:
 

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Magnum88C said:
Next you damn people will have me casting my own bullets.

:dgrin:
I have it on good authority that if you cast those bullets out of pot metal and spit, those bullets from an old smokepole will penetrate body armor.

RIKA :D
 

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RIKA said:
but that Lancaster is a beauty, isn't it? RIKA :)
Oh ya, I love the look of a curly maple stock.
 

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brass hammer said:
my black-powder 'resume is pistol-ball wheelers[i've a repo .44 revolving carbine on the mantle
Always wanted one of those myself Brass. Unique little weapons.
 

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Magnum88C said:
Next you damn people will have me casting my own bullets.
I can help you with that too Magnum! :nyah:
 

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BUT, IFFIN' I COULD ONLY 'BUST-MY-LUST' FOR THE 'BELT-FEEDS'! :dgrin:
 

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Split the difference Brass........get a Gattling Gun.
 

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Dixons Muzzle loaders? Pennsylvania Muzzleloader shop

I live in Berks county( Boyertown ) - I check out Dixons muzzleloading shop in Kempton Pa. once a month. Lot of nice products.
 

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Brass Barreled Blunderbuss

http://www.middlesexvillagetrading.com/MSBB.shtml


These are fun little guns.



Here is how the barrels compare to each other. The Brass gun as an 18" three stage barrel with a double wedding ring. The whole thing weighs 6 lb. The steel gun has a 15" two stage barrel with a single wedding ring. It weighs 5.1 lb.



.
The buttplate is English style, but the thumb piece and sharp angle of the comb are Germanic, a typical mix of styles that are typical of "low country" manufacture.
Holland and Belgium were prolific arms producing countries in the 17th-19th centuries and it was not unusual for gunmakers to mix style like this.



It has an English style triggerguard with an acorn finial.
Another indicator of it's Dutch heritage is the lack of engraving on the triggerguard.
The gunsmith would have simply made a pattern from an English piece but not wasted the time with fancy engraving as would be seen on a fowler.
Dutch arms were built for fighting, not for show!




Bore diameter is .730 as measured 3" down the barrel.











 
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