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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
and you have to "tent" both the PEVA and "breathable" mylar bags away from each other, definitely dont want your head inside of the shelter, it creates a lot of condensation if you do, really fast. The net bags wrapped around my legs reallyhelp vs the cold Next test will be to see how much it helps to stuff debris between the bags. and my clothing. I bet that takes it down 10F, and if i got acclimated to t cold and used the dakota pit for hot rocks, I could handle 0F, altho probably not sleeping. Having to do calisthenics all night in order to stay warm. But the greenhouse effect of the mylar and PEVA in the morning, with hot rocks and water, shouid let me sleep from 11 am to 5 pm given a sedative. If shtf, Im going to be bicycling 100 miles south very night for a week, if cold weather is in the offing. The mylar doesnt actually let water get to you, but any place that's cold and damp that touches the mylar and then touches you, it's a cold spot. I've not yet noticed any condensation under me. Its heavily on the PEVA above me, tho. The tenting effect brings the water down the sides of the peva quickly where the debris can absorb it, or my bandanna can wipe it down. Having to have two ridgleiines is something of a pita but the more space betwen the mylar and the PEVA, the better. Guess Ill gather up some old newspapaers wad them up amd stuff the them between the bags and see if I can hande 10F. it rarely gets that cold here, tho

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Melvin's lack of common sense and the lack of real world experience sings out loudly. Those of us who have had past experience in the field for weeks and months at a time know that you need something that is rated beyond the climate that you expect, because weather doesn't always work on your schedule. If you are out in the bush, you must be also ready to defend yourself against both 2 legged and 4 legged intruders on very short notice both day and night. Doing PT at night to stay warm, does not put you in the best condition to defend yourself 12 hours later if you have to. Body heat escapes from the human body the easiest through the head, to have your head sticking out in the wind, rain, snow, sleet is not really an intelligent plan but then from Melvin's situational description, I'm assuming that he plans to "dig in" on a beach in California!
 

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or you could invest in a quality sleeping system, and sleep comfortably in all weather, being awake and well rested when required. Starting out handicapped and putting yourself into an energy deficit is a bad idea. Using a sedative is also a bad idea, especially since you are planning to be alone.
 

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The "100 miles per night" on a bike doesn't sound too unreasonable except for also saying there'd be a month's worth of food on the bike; not to mention other things like water, weapons, shelter, etc. That'd be about like carrying a passenger on the bike; a passenger that's not helping with the pedaling.
 

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The "100 miles per night" on a bike doesn't sound too unreasonable except for also saying there'd be a month's worth of food on the bike; not to mention other things like water, weapons, shelter, etc. That'd be about like carrying a passenger on the bike; a passenger that's not helping with the pedaling.
no, he isn't going to be doing 100 miles a night, unless he is on a road and using a light. if it is SHTF, then he will be subject to ambushes by anyone better prepared than him. a couple of guys watching a road (or a trail) with NVDs will pretty much destroy his day. Especially if he's been traveling for a while, like 50 miles into his 100.

If he wants to be stealthy, carrying any kind of a load with a bike, he better re-think his travel distance and be happy with 25 miles a night on roads, 10-15 miles on nice trails, 5-6 if they're rough and he isn't using a light or proper NVDs. Any faster and he will be noisy or dump his load multiple times. based on how he described his gear and use of drugs to sleep and ignore the cold, he will be fatigued after the first night.

I don't think he will fare as well as he thinks he will - especially since he has never tried using any of his gear for real.
 

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I agree no way in heck is he going to accomplish that. Particularly if he "VC's" the bike and permanently looks the front wheel.
But that might be a different fantasy in another alternative reality of his.🙄

Back to the thread title:
Is he talking about wearing 3pr of wool socks to bed at night? Or packing 3 pair of them for Big House Melvin's Big Adventure?

Good wool blend socks are great. I even had a few pairs of nearly 100% wool can't remember the exact amount Wigwam brand decades ago. Those along with polypropylene sock liners were good to around -10F along with a decent pair of boots. Danners w/ Goretex or one odd brand Donner Mt. insulated. I used to joke and call them "Donner Party Dinner Shoes".
 

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I agree no way in heck is he going to accomplish that. Particularly if he "VC's" the bike and permanently looks the front wheel.
I never understood that either; saying we should weld bars in place to 'strengthen' the front wheel and keep it in line with the rear wheel. Meaning that you can no llonger turn the front wheel to take corners or curves; never understood how you can get anywhere fast with that kind of setup.

I specifically (and politely) asked him why do that, but of course no response.
 

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wool socks are awesome - I pretty much only use merino wool socks in the woods any more...
 
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