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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
According to today's regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 40's, 50's, 60's, or even maybe the early 70's, probably shouldn't have survived.

Our baby cribs were covered with bright colored lead-based paint, and had bars wide enough to get pour heads stuck between them.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets, and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets.

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags.

Riding in the back of a pickup truck on a warm day was always a special treat.

We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle. Horrors!

We ate cupcakes, bread and butter, and drank Kool-Aid with sugar in it, but we were never overweight because we were always outside playing.

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle, and no one actually died from this.

We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then rode down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the street lights came on. No one was able to reach us all day. No cell phones. Unthinkable!

We did not have PlayStations, Nintendo 64, X-Boxes, no video games at all, no 99 channels on cable, video tape movies, surround sound, personal cell phones, personal computers, or Internet chat rooms. We had real people friends! We went outside and found them.

We played dodge ball, and sometimes, the ball would really hurt.

We fell out of trees, got cut and broke bones and teeth, and there were no lawsuits from these accidents. They were accidents. No one was to blame but us. Remember accidents?

We had fights and punched each other and got black and blue and learned to get over it.

We made up games with sticks and tennis balls and ate worms, and although we were told it would happen, we did not put out very many eyes, nor did the worms live inside us forever.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's home and knocked on the door, or rang the bell or just walked in and talked to them.

We walked to school, even in the pouring rain. Some of us really did walk 2 miles in the snow!

Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment.

We had to work for an allowance, and that meant actual physical labor. It was not even conceivable to have our own credit card at age 16. We didn't even know what a Visa or Mastercard was.

Some students weren't as smart as others, so they failed a grade and were held back to repeat the same grade. Tests were not adjusted for any reason. Our actions were our own. Consequences were expected.

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke a law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law. Imagine that!

When we did something bad, we were punished for it. We even got spanked. We weren’t abused, we had it coming!

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers and problem solvers and inventors, ever.

The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas. We had freedom, failure, success, accountability and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all. Congratulations.

Those of us who are baby boomers and even before, had the luck to grow up as kids, before lawyers and government regulated our lives, for our own good...

Kind of makes you want to run through the house with scissors, doesn’t it?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm 38 years old and if its a nice hot day and I've been working outside all day I'll still drink from the garden hose until I feel like I'll burst. Bottled water my a**

its kind of funny, whenever we remember the "good old days" we were neither good nor old.

Thanks for the post Marcia I agree with everything 100%

Steve Schindler
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You know, it's really an odd feeling when my grandkids ask me what it was like in the 'olden' days. I'm 49 years old, and it feels like the good old days were not that long ago until I look in the mirror. I knew it was coming when my own kids said, "Hey Mom, I need to show you how to help me do my homework."

When we learned our times-tables, we had to memorize them because calculators weren't even invented yet. My own grown kids can't remember how to add or subtract without using one, and quite frankly it doesn't come easy to me anymore, either!

I often wonder if it was my generation that was deprived because we didn't have the 'cool' toys the kids have today, or all the hi-tech games and internet. But then I remember that we had imaginations in the 'olden days' and could take a stick and pretend it was a magic wand or anything we wanted it to be. We could take a bath towel and turn it into a Superman cape, or play kick the can with the entire neighborhood (including parents!) Going out to get a hamburger was a very special treat, and we ran through the sprinkler on hot days because waterparks didn't exist.

Then I realize that it was not us that were deprived, it is our own children and grandchildren who don't know what to do with themselves without Ninentdo, or God forbid have to walk somewhere!

Sorry for being nostalgic, but I guess I'm just having a hard time letting go of the times when we had to put forth some effort to achieve something, and the ability to use our imaginations and pretend. Heck, I can't even pretend I'm a young woman!
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I often wonder if it was my generation that was deprived because we didn't have the 'cool' toys the kids have today, or all the hi-tech games and internet.
With regards to store bought toys...

Does anyone besides me remember this strange substance, things used to be made out of it, everything was made out of it...

It was called Me-tal...

Everything from toys to snow shovels (that didn't break mind you) to cars... Yes, cars(!) not made from plastic!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
And candy bars cost a nickle and you couldn't even eat a whole one.

Seriously, I remember a skit on SNL (I think) where two old geezers were sitting on a park bench talking about the "olden" days. The basic premis was how computers and computerized gadgets had gotten smaller and smaller and the price had gone down. Essentially they used to be big and expensive but now they are small and cheap. Then in a round about way of reasoning the subject changed to candy bars and how the size has gone down and the price has gone up. essentially they used to be big and cheap but now they are small and expensive. each character tried to outdo the other when rembering things and it got pretty funny.

I agree with you marcia. I don't feel as though I had a deprived childhood (depraved maybe but not deprived)

Steve Schindler
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Oh, and I want to thank you for bringing up the good old days Marcia. I got so nostalgic that I spent $60.00 at Amazon.com buying movies that I remembered from my childhood. Yeah, thanks a lot :rolleyes:
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
good ol days

Marcia it was a well thought post that brought some warm memories
Steve...... SNL I remember the first show, hell remember when Star Trek was a weekly series???
The courtship if Eddies Father
Family Affair
Leave it to Beaver
Giligans Island


man the memories
 

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But does anyone remember Colonel Bleep? I remember getting up very early on Saturdays to watch this spaceman cartoon on a Black & White TV. We didn't get a color TV until I was about 12, and the first show I saw was Let's make a Deal with Monty Hall. I turned to my brother and said "wow look at all the colors" meaning on all those really crazy costumes, and my brother said "What did you expect its color TV". Made me feel like a class A younger brother dufus; but I was amazed to see color on TV.

As for Colonel Bleep, I have only ever met two people who remember this cartoon; although I once saw videos of it for sale in a video mag. Kind of sorry I did not buy them.

Oh well, those were the good old days, and these are now the good old days. You learn that about today, that is that today will soon enough be part of the good old days, if only you live long enough. I cannot imagine what my kids will be looking at when they reminisce sometime in the future about the good old days - what toys will their kids have?
 

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And by the way - I never ate worms - but I am still waiting for the apple tree or the water melon vine to start growing in my stomach because I ate the seeds!
 

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My Dad, who has always been a huge technology buff, went out and rented a color TV for us to watch the moon landing. He was sorely dissappointed!


Think about it . . .
 

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That would have been a bummer, not much color to see. And now you have me wondering, did they even broadcast in color from the moon?

My great-grandfather and great-grandmother had a live in companion who was about as old as them. When he saw the moon landing, he told me straight out that it was not real - as he shook his head with a big excited smile on his face. You could feel the electricity in the room of his absolute and utter amazement at the great accomplishment. At the same time you could also feel the strength of an opposing force emanating from within him - his inability, at least in part of him, to believe that it was real. I am pretty sure he actually believed it was happening, but he was really knocked for a loop by what for him was a truly wonderous event, and it was hard for him to believe it was happening in his lifetime. He was in his seventies (I think, or maybe eighties) at the time, and he had fought in the big one, that is the first big one WWI.

Well not so many years later, there was this movie about astronauts who were supposed to be going to the moon; except they were in a studio making believe. Yes that was the premise of the movie: that the whole lunar landing thing had been faked. It made me wonder if good old Franz Weber had been on the money when he said to me that it was not real - because you see his next sentence, after he said it was not real, was that it was all just something they did in Hollywood, like a movie!
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Glenn,

There are lots and LOTS of people who *still* insist that the U.S. has never been on the moon. There's a website about it somewhere, with numerous explanations of how it was all a hoax. I can imagine that when it happened, the percentage of people who felt it was staged was probably quite large, yet I doubt many expressed their feelings out loud for fear of appearing unpatriotic.
 

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Glenn,

No, it was broadcast in black and white. Dad was really excited about the whole thing, but when the rented TV showed the black and white images, he was crushed. ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
As a young kid, there was only one family on our block that owned a TV, and needless to say it was the most popular house in our neighborhood. It was an old B & W RCA with a round screen, and the contrast was so awful we all had to sit huddled in front of the screen with a huge blanket over us and the TV so be able to see it! We didn't get one until I was about age 7.

I remember seeing "The Wizard of Oz" at someone's house with a color TV and was awestruck when it changed from B & W to color when Dorothy came out of the house in Munchkin Land. WOW.

I am still awed by the on-screen graphics the these 'current' good old days whe I see shows like "Walking with Dinosaurs" on Discovery and movies like "Matrix." It's no wonder my kids and grandkids think anything can be computer generated... just like walking on the moon.
 

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It is pretty awesome to see some of the wonders of modern technology such as the special effects seen in movies. That Wizard Of Oz scene where it turns to color was a great one, and of course so too were the effects in the Matrix. Yet, despite their spectacular grandiosity, there is something they just can't accomplish. They just cannot put that look onto a kids face or put the wonder and happiness into their being! You guys know it, all of you have had it on your own faces, and all of you have seen it on the faces of other kids.

It is the look of his willpower against yours, begging for one more cast of the line. Then it becomes the look of amazed determination when you hear your son screaming: "Holy cow dad - did you see it jump?", as he reels in THE fish of a lifetime, a fat 22 inch Brown Trout on that very same last cast of the trip.

Or that look of, I am too cool holding this Baird's Ratsnake, even though I surely don't have dad's affinity for scaly things. A picture that will eventually wind up on the dorm wall or the dorm room's front door next semester - I am sure of that!

Or maybe it is the look of sheer exuberance on the face of your daughter when she, among a gang of 4 frog hunters, catches more frogs than the other three kids combined – all boys (one of those kids is her dad).

Or the look of sheer self satisfaction as your daughter walks down the aisle - a high school graduate, and honor student – or better still her look of happiness when she learns she is getting to live away for college despite the financial burden at home.

Or the look of both son and daughter the first time you hand them a loaded rifle for some target practice. That kind of disbelief that you really are trusting them so much; but it is mixed with the look of uncertainty that they will be worthy of it. Better still is the look they have smiling from ear to ear when they see the first bulls eye!

Or how about the look of sheer lunacy that crosses your daughter’s face as she chases her younger brother, who has the look of abject terror on his face, while she is holding a large Cicada – and the boy is terrified of them.

These are all “The Look” that doesn’t come from a TV or computer game no matter how hard they try to find the feeling there to give em that look. Getting out there and doing it, no matter what it is will get you that look from them. That look is what makes the good old days so gosh darned good!

 

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And candy bars cost a nickle and you couldn't even eat a whole one.
I really do remember when they were a nickel, but I don't remember having trouble finishing them!
 
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