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My 1898 Krag rifle is still in fantastic working order after 110 years. I shoot it every other week, and it's still very accurate. My only fear is that, while there is no rust at all on it, the original bluing is about gone. This rifle is a family heirloom, and I do not intend on ever selling it. I want it to stay in good condition and remain functional. What would the cost be to get it reblued by a respected gun shop, and short of its dollar "value" going down, are there any other concern I should have rebluing an old rifle like that?
 

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First of all, I don't think I would get it reblued. Well oiled will preserve it just fine. However, its your rifle. If you absolutely must get it reblued, don't let the man BUFF IT on his polishing wheels. Most refinishers will want to make it shine like a new dime and will buff out the markings during the polishing process; it will be absolutely UGLY to anybody who knows about rifles. There are chemicals that can safely strip off blue and rust without harming the metal. Now the blue that he will use will be a hot caustic blue that will be a totally improper finish for the time period when the rifle was made. If it was my rifle, I would rust blue it. Rust blue will cost more if you pay to have it done but the rifle will look better. Good thing is that the average guy/gal can do rust blueing on the kitchen stove and table. I've rust blued rifles and handguns with excellent results.

RIKA
 

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Listen to Rika; she knows of what she speaks...

I have a Krag that has been in my family for a hundred years or more, the blue is faded, stock has some dings and dents, but I'll never be able to "restore" it, too many stories and memories of how it got the way it is today!
I still load for it, shoot it every so often, and give her a good oil rag rubdown afterwards. I'd like to go back to Eastern Wash. and hunt one more time too.

It will be my grandson's 16th birthday present like it was to me, along with the WW1 and WW2 stuff that came at the same time. Hopefully he will appreciate the history of the rifle...
 

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This rifle does have a lot of history. It was my grandfather's rifle, who passed away in 1990. From there it went to my father, who was instructed to give it to me when I was old enough. It's mine now, and while the bluing is all but gone, I still am religious about oiling it up and wiping down the metal parts after I use it - and when I'm not shooting it, I take every caution not to touch the metal :unhappy:. Perhaps a little type-A, but I want this rifle to last a long, long time. Thanks for yall's suggestions, and I will definitely go with what RIKA said and not worry about rebluing, instead just concentrate on what I've been doing and keeping it super clean.
 
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