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without all of the debris. in case all is soaked or covered in snow. Fold the 50x10 ft of 2" mesh net-hammock in half, 50x5ft of 1" mesh, eh? Then fold it the other way, 25 x 5 ft. Wrap it around my leg a few times, around torso once, over to other leg a few wraps, then around torso. until use it all. All of this outside of clothing. Cut a hole in it for urination, can easily repair same. This will add quite a bit of dead air space under the 3 drum liners that will then be wrapped around me. (no debris available) Stuff the buttpack and day pack with debris (need not be dry, the packs are thick and water proof sprayed, and use them and the soft armor as ground-pads. good down to 10F, given a bit of debris dried out in a couple of hours, and stuffed between the Amazon bugnet "suits' , worn as long johns. Drying out that much debris is not hard, given the reflective 2Go Systems Trifecta reflective bivy, the UCO lantern and the beeswax candle. If can't use any debris at all, it's good to 20F and a discrete Dakota fire pit can heat up rocks or water in half an hour, Put the warmed items inside of the bivy and sleep ok at 10F, for 2-3 hours. Repeat as needed. A night spend drying out debris with hot rocks will get enough of the insulation done to add another 10F or more degrees., So, 0F when fully-ready. If dont need the debris, dump it out. This way you're not stuck with carrying 10 lbs of unneeded gear/clothing all summer, you see.
 

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Should be no problem. Sleeping inside a trash bag on the ground in the woods, surely the bags won't rip. I mean, surely there's nothing on the forest floor that can harm a mighty trashcan liner with the weight of a grown human pushing against it. And filling up your daypack with wet debris & using your body armor as a sleeping pad won't hurt a thing.

Then again, at least some the debris DOES have to be dry, hence the "debris dried out in a couple of hours" caveat. I mean, spending hours every day drying out waterlogged forest debris (on some hand-crafted grate over a fire I suppose...?) is a very good use of time and resources in a survival situation.
 
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Or you could go to Cabela's and buy proper gear to fit your needs. No messing with garbage bags and wet leaves and twigs for insulation. Why are you camping out in 10F to begin with? For fun? I don't know anyone who has the sense of a well trained Dog would choose to bed out in sub-freezing temperature's in trash filled garbage bags. I look out at my woods and see tons of dead leaves and branches. It was 25 Degrees here last night and the thought of rolling all that wet, cold debris in garbage bags and sleeping in it is just plain crazy.
 
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Or you could go to Cabela's and buy proper gear to fit your needs...
He's already explained this. Buying gear means you're cheap. And carrying said gear means you're lazy. If you were a self-proclaimed genius, you'd understand these things.

(Do try to keep up... 🤠 )
 

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Melvin just buy and/or assembly a decent sleep system for Pete's Sake!
There's no prize reward for survival in real life beyond living. Nothing for doing it on the cheap.
Losing however is very costly.
 

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Melvin, in case you have never been in a hostile environment before 2 of the most important things are the ability to move quickly and to move quietly. Lets just forget about the ability to keep you warm, since that doesn't seem to matter to you. I have the impression we are back at the "Alone" fantasy, in a real life catastrophe staying in one place could be a bad choice. Certainly that has been proven season after season where contestants have caught minimal wild life for food. If you have to use debris, your debris will be bulky, maybe noisy, or wet which will cause it to be heavier. Quick movement in confined areas will add to your problems.
 
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I've thought a way, that I've tried, that works at 10F - it's called using proper gear. A good sleeping bag, liner, tent, and ground pad. I also know the system can work for many days, not a couple hours.
 

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I don't know how much they weigh exactly but here's a picture of a full box of 24 , 42gallon 3mil thick trash bags from Lowe's.
Right next to two sleeping bags in stuff sacks.
Just by feel that box of trash bags weighs roughly 2x as much as BOTH sleeping bags. A bivey bag and a small tarp wouldn't add much at all and be a lot less Rube Goldberg in set up.
Black Automotive tire Material property Synthetic rubber Font

One bag is an outer GI MSS Intermediate bag in Green.
The other is a Woods Brand Light Weight bag I bought from Brigade Quartermaster's in 98 or '99 iirc. Also intermediate with a realistic rating of 30F by me.
Combined and with proper shelter I'd go +10-15F.
 

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I just was outside walking the Hound through a foot and a half of snow and the temperature is -1 degrees. Plastic bags and leaves? He's crazier than a s*** house rat.
 
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Melvin really does need to spend more time considering the temperature fluctuations over a 12 month period.

from wiki

The average temperature is 61.4 °F (16.3 °C), with the monthly daily average ranging from 39.2 °F (4.0 °C) in January to 83.0 °F (28.3 °C) in July. Extremes range from −17 °F (−27 °C) on February 12, 1899 to 113 °F (45 °C) on August 11, 1936, and August 3, 2012;[48] the last sub-zero (Fahrenheit) reading was −14 °F (−26 °C) on February 16, 2021.[49][50] Temperatures reach 100 °F (38 °C) on 10.4 days of the year, 90 °F (32 °C) on nearly 70 days, and fail to rise above freezing on 8.3 days.[49] The city receives about 35.9 inches (91.2 cm) of precipitation annually, of which 8.6 inches (21.8 cm) is snow.
 
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Although further west he's still in a similar climate to here in Arkansas.
As I've stated before that means not only temperature variants over the whole year but during a whole week in the winter.
Getting acclimated to the weather is pretty much out.
And doing so at an older age is much more difficult.
And worse yet with physical disabilities.
Plus, more dangerous when you refuse to acknowledge them.
 

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...not only temperature variants over the whole year but during a whole week in the winter.
This imo, plus allowing for the fact that sometimes weather swings are fast and big. We're supposed to be near 60 degrees here both tomorrow and the day after, but it was just a few mornings ago that it was 11 degrees when I left the house. Most years we average around 2 total inches of snow, spread out over the course of the entire winter, but last year about this time we had 10+ inches of snow on the ground at one time.

Worst-case scenarios are the whole point of prepping/survivalist things in the first place, and to NOT plan worst-case when it comes to being at the mercy of the weather is a very dangerous way to plan.
 
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Some people would rather fantasize, rather than do the hard work of planning!
 
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I’ve been on hunts where it was shirtsleeve weather during the day, and blizzard and freezing temps that night. The weather does whatever it can…

but, because I always pack for worst case, I was nice and warm all night long.

gear matters.
 

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Two sayings repeatedly come to mind:

1). Pack (or travel) light and freeze at night.
2). Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.
 

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In the last 14 days up here, we have gone from -45F to +48F. IN ONLY 14 DAYS!
 

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Yep, and it's come to my attention that in the past he's talked about, to the point of bragging, the purchase of gold.
But not much in the way of field gear. I don't make a point of trying to memorize his stuff but....
I remember maybe a A.L.I.C.E. pack and possibly some un-named civilian one.
And a sleeping bag of unknown origin kept in the vehicle with no mention of others.😑
While no rental real estate mogul or gold investor I'd have to recount how many various sleeping bags I have accumulated.
Even after donating a few.
I've also got a few temporary shelters aka tube tents in some of my SHTF LBE if I get separated from my pack. But I'm seriously considering placing one in the left back pocket of my BDU pants.
Right now I have one nested in my canteen pouch.
Point is get good gear and learn how to use it.
If needed hobo shelters can be made from nature and what we can find of man made materials but be careful not to count on them.
Being tall and having a XLARGE TO XXL head, hands and feet plus a Neanderthal like bone structure has taught me Not to rely upon scrounging clothing or sleeping gear post SHTF.
 

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There was a decent episode of Corporals Corner where he made a teepee from a cheap tarp. He still used a quality pad and his sleep gear to sleep in it. He also made two fires: a small one inside the teepee and a larger one outside to cook over and use as a source for additional hot coals.

He had paracord, a saw, a shovel, a heat reflective blanket, a sleeping pad, and some sleeping gear.

using fire correctly, you can stay warm and dry. IIRC, he got it into the 70's inside, while it was snowing and cold outside. He was able to sleep comfortably.

You can improvise and still build a decent shelter if you are smart about it.
 
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