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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
all you have to DO, dumbass, is weigh a Ciener .22 unit slide, for the 1911, or some equally heavy, yet functional .22 pistol slide, and weigh the M21 slide. YOu can come to ME, and BET big bucks, and lose it, or get your ass stomped, whichever you'd like.
 

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andy said:
all you have to DO, dumbass, is weigh a Ciener .22 unit slide, for the 1911, or some equally heavy, yet functional .22 pistol slide, and weigh the M21 slide. YOu can come to ME, and BET big bucks, and lose it, or get your ass stomped, whichever you'd like.
Another version of the FRUITY TOUGH CON ACT. Your not a 'little light on your feet, are you?"
 

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andy said:
YOu can come to ME, and BET big bucks, and lose it, or get your ass stomped, whichever you'd like.
I'm not worried about getting stomped, I'm worried about being set on. Andy (mr. light-on-his-feet) would squash me flat. :D

RIKA
 

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TIG welding aka Heli-Arc process and GTAW

There aren't many metals, either ferrous or non-ferrous that cannot be welded with the TIG- Tungsten Inert Gas, An inert gas is non-flammable, Argon and Helium- an non-inert, such as Hydrogen (read Hindenberg 1937 Big Bang theory here) is flammable. The inert gas shields the welding arc from oxygen, in both TIG and MIG (Metallic Inert Gas) welding processes, much as the gas produced from the arc shield from the flux that is burned and consumed in the "stick" welding process. I'll pass on welding aluminum (100% pure Tungsten electrode, end "balled" and on AC high freq- and stick with ferrous, such as hardened steels used in mfg. firearms. Pre-heat and inter pass temps. are critical, as post heat and wrap, annealing the area prior to the welding process is critical on Air, Water and Oil hardened alloy steels- DC straight polarity (80% of the amperage (heat) is in the parent metal in this polarity setting, 1 or 2 % thoria tungsten (thorium prevents the electrode, which is NOT consumed in the TIG process from breaking down, ground to a flat tip- amperage, open circuit voltage, size of cup, torch, tungsten and flow of shielding gas all basically depend on ther thickness and mass of the piece(s) to be welded. Most, but not all TIG welding is done on a bench in the downhand position- wind must be contained in TIG and MIG, to prevent a breeze from blowing the shielding gas away from the welding zone and the resulting HAZ- Heat Affected Zone. Hope I got it right- TIG welding is like brain surgery- not a real "do it your-self-er" in my book.
 

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MIG welding and metallurgy

MIg means Metallic Inert Gas- the consumable electrode is a spool fed alloyed wire, shielded by the inert gas- amperage, open circuit voltage, travel speed, joint and metal prep are all important, just as in SMAW (stick electrode) welding, the wire is by dia. and also AWS code, just as in stick welding- .025" wire for body shop (thin metals) .045-.060 wire for metal fabrication shop work- an Lincoln .050 70-S-3 wire (70,000 psi. min. tensile as stress relieved, S-3 75% Argon 25% Co2 gas- Austinite is a non-magnetic compound produced in ferrous metal are it is heated, quenched and worked- Martinsite is a similar compound but it develops without work hardening- both serve to bond the molecules of the metal into a homogenous mass-an example of the opposite might be the older Damascus shotgun barrels, steel and iron were heated, twisted on a mandrel, and then hammer welded together. An earlier thread mentioned TIG as during WW11 for welding aluminum and magnesium- known then as Heli-Arc as Helium was the main shielding gas used- Linde first developed this for Aircraft and Glider frame welding. Magnesium was later used for small lawnmower decks- it has the basic strength (tensile) as a comparable grade of Aluminum, but it is highly flammable in powder form, and the only sure way to extinguish a Magnesium fire is to smother it in sand. You can spark test most ferrous metals, but there is a "quick and dirty" test to determine if you have aluminum or magnesium- take a new Mill Bastard file-file shavings from one piece with one clean side of the file, use the other clean side on the other-save the shavings on clean paper, light them- the aluminum shavings won't burn, but the magnesium ones will- this won't tell you which grade of aluminum you have however.
 
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