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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
but also, fewer is better, too. the more guns that you shoot, if they are different as to loads/type, the less skilled you are with any one of them, and to me, skilll is where it's at. slowfire skill is kid stuff, anyone can learn to do it easily, especially if the gun features a silencer., really fast gun handling and hitting of chest sized targets, especially with ccw guns and fighting rifles, that's useful and to me, fascinating.

the open jacket and fbi "brush" technique is bs, since you often can't wear a jacket (too hot) or it's windy, cold, raining, etc, and you have to fasten it. I believe, most fervently in KISS, murphy, and train as you'll fight. So I mostly use the left hand to "brush up" the tail of a t shirt or sweat shirt, if I am using a belt rig at all. I have long favored the navel position, rather than behind the hip, and averaging less than 1.0 second, for chest hits at 5 yds, from hands at sides, seems to be the bottom line.

Guys are attaining faster raise and hit times with the rifle than I imagined possible, tho, and Single Stage trigger pulls, are making repeat hit speeds almost twice as fast as I thought could be achieved.
 

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And some people just enjoy themselves shooting multiple types of firearms. Everyone has a different perspective to life. Live with it!
 

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so I wonder what happens if your shorty AR becomes inoperable and all you can resupply with is an AK or a bolt action? bet you'll wish you had enough skills with other weapons then. Like how to field strip and clean them. malfunction drills, mag changes, etc.

I'm confident in my skill set, shooting a variety of weapons in a variety of settings, at a variety or ranges. I like to enjoy life, which includes hunting, hiking, camping, archery, and target shooting.

so, while you're thinking about stuff, I'll be out there doing stuff. I wonder who picks up more skills in the real world, you or me?
 

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It may have been on PN or here back when I really gave a shit about trying to change his mind.
I gave an example of this in which his beloved CAR-15 well shit the bed beyond what could be fixed with anything like SPORTS etc.,
And he HAD TO get an shot (dead or wounded )opponent's AK type rifle unfucked and back in operation muy pronto. Which required a basic knowledge of AK assembly/disassembly.
I can't recall if he just ignored me or replied in his usual pleasant manner.
 

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...the more guns that you shoot, if they are different as to loads/type, the less skilled you are with any one of them
This is why guys who alternate between striker-fired double-stack pistols, 1911's, AR rifles, shotguns, and even revolvers, simply can't be truly 'great' with any particular one of them. I heard one guy (who's a competitive 3-gun shooter) say that one of his top-five favorite guns was a Mauser bolt action of all things; going so far as to say that the old bolt gun "has probably taught me more about marksmanship and offhand shooting than any other firearm I own". And even though he competes mostly with autos and I suspect owns a whole lot of guns, he says his second-favorite gun is a nickel-plated 5-shot .38 caliber revolver. So clearly he's someone who can't really be taken very seriously as a shooter.

His name is Jerry Miculek, but still...


I know that when I drive my wife's Jeep on the weekends, it really makes me much less competent to go back to driving my own truck on Monday. And wearing boots in the woods makes it difficult to wear my walking shoes on Monday as well. And worse still, I normally use a gel pen through the day, and when I picked up a mechanical pencil to fill out some forms last week, it was just about impossible to form letters with the crazy thing.

Life is hard, but what can you do...?
 

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The choice is simple, "versatility and flexibility" or "One trick pony". Which do you prefer?
 
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The faulty assumption here, is that experience and skills don't transfer between platforms. I'd argue the opposite.
 

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but also, fewer is better, too. the more guns that you shoot, if they are different as to loads/type, the less skilled you are with any one of them, and to me, skilll is where it's at. slowfire skill is kid stuff, anyone can learn to do it easily, especially if the gun features a silencer., really fast gun handling and hitting of chest sized targets, especially with ccw guns and fighting rifles, that's useful and to me, fascinating. . . .
You're opinion and suggestions run contrary to the advanced pistol training I once received. I'll never forget the day I was on the firing line when an older instructor suddenly decided that he wanted me to switch pistols. I was using a Glock, and I was shooting it well when he told me to put it down and pick up an XD.

Well wouldn't you know! When I switched from the Glock with its low bore axis to an XD with its high bore axis my accuracy suddenly went all to hell. I made an excuse for myself by saying that I needed a few minutes to get used to a different pistol (a statement that I thought was true), and that is when the old pistol instructor 'exploded' in my face!

The man 'read me the riot act'. In front of the entire group he reamed me out for being incompetent, too slow to catch on, and too damned inaccurate to guarantee my own survival with what he called a 'battlefield pickup' in hand. Wow, was I embarrassed! At that time I considered myself to be pretty decent with a pistol, and I did not like the 'old guy' taking me to task in front of the group like that (I had some 'face' to save too).

That old instructor told me that no matter how well I could handle MY PISTOL, I also had to be able to handle the OTHER GUY'S PISTOL equally well. So this is how my 'cross-training' with handguns began! Want to have some fun? Try switching between using a semiautomatic pistol, and a revolver several times over the course of a range session; and, remember, the goal is to be able to shoot each of them equally well, and without experiencing a temporary loss of either speed, or accuracy.

Admittedly, this took me a while (perhaps several months) to learn; but in the end it improved everything for me—and especially the grab time and accuracy whenever I transitioned down to my backup gun! In addition to learning how to switch from pistol to pistol what other important handgun control lessons did I learn?

OK, I learned that proper pistol handling and accuracy is ALL IN HOW WELL, OR NOT, YOU ACQUIRE YOUR GRIP on the pistol. You've got to know how to grab a pistol correctly, each time, every time; and you've also got to be able to instantly ascertain where each pistol's exact 'control points' are the moment you grab onto it. Things will never be more difficult for ya than when you're switching between a semi-auto, and a revolver; BUT, it can be done; and a competent pistolero needs to know how to do this smoothly and well.

I'd suggest that you get over that 'one gun nonsense'. Why? Because it's a sure sign of the fact that you're only an amateur shooter. But, that's OK! Actually, it's the way that we all start out. What you don't want to do is stay there, at the same level of technical naïveté, and never develop into the well-rounded shooter that you could be.

Back in the day, I used to prefer to use revolvers; I absolutely loved shooting revolvers, and I still do! It wasn't until after 'the mutts' began running in packs that I finally stopped carrying my beloved S&W Model: 19's, 27's, 29's, and 686's, and started carrying Colt 1911's, Browning P35's, and (of course) the—not so cheap anymore, but, still trashy and expendable—'Tupperware pistols' that I use today.

Remember, you've got to be good with the other guy's gun too! ;)
 

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…the old pistol instructor 'exploded' in my face!

The man 'read me the riot act'. In front of the entire group he reamed me out for being incompetent
I decided years ago that if a person can’t make their point without yelling, they’re simply not worth my time. It may be due to growing up surrounded by (and subject to) emotion-based asshats, but it's a conclusion I reached relatively early in life. Doesn’t matter if they’re an instructor, a politician, a preacher, an umpire, or whatever – if they have to yell to make their point, it’s simply not possible for me to respect them or whatever it is that they’re selling.

Simply put, that guy was an asshat; which is unfortunately common in the instructor/politician/preacher world.



…I'd suggest that you get over that 'one gun nonsense'. Why? Because it's a sure sign of the fact that you're only an amateur shooter. But, that's OK! Actually, it's the way that we all start out. What you don't want to do is stay there, at the same level of technical naïveté, and never develop into the well-rounded shooter that you could be.

Back in the day, I used to prefer to use revolvers; I absolutely loved shooting revolvers, and I still do! It wasn't until after 'the mutts' began running in packs that I finally stopped carrying my beloved S&W Model: 19's, 27's, 29's, and 686's, and started carrying Colt 1911's, Browning P35's, and (of course) the—not so cheap anymore, but, still trashy and expendable—'Tupperware pistols' that I use today.
Remember, you've got to be good with the other guy's gun too!
On all this, agree completely. Even though my edc’s are autos, I still usually enjoy revolvers more.
 

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Three points I always stuck to: 1. Don't talk down to Student's. 2. Encourage questions and don't be shy about praising someone who asks a good question. 3.Never, ever, yell at a Student. Mistakes are teaching points.
 
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