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Your favorite all time classic shotty

  • Remington Model 870

    Votes: 22 41.5%
  • Remington Model 11 / BROWNING A5

    Votes: 13 24.5%
  • Winchester model 1897

    Votes: 17 32.1%
  • Winchester model 12

    Votes: 9 17.0%
  • Ithaca model 37

    Votes: 12 22.6%
  • Remington model 31

    Votes: 4 7.5%
  • Marlin model 24

    Votes: 3 5.7%
  • J.Stevens Model 520 - 620

    Votes: 5 9.4%
  • Winchester Model 50

    Votes: 5 9.4%
  • Remington Model 10

    Votes: 3 5.7%
  • Stevens Model 67

    Votes: 3 5.7%
  • High Standard Flite King

    Votes: 3 5.7%
  • Winchester Model 21

    Votes: 4 7.5%
  • Mossberg 500E

    Votes: 14 26.4%
  • Harrington & Richardson topper

    Votes: 3 5.7%
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That is an awesome collection you have there yourself Gunners762. Some really nice exposed hammer guns there.
 

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C'mon, seriously? No love for the H&R Topper? I know you've all owned one...
 

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Model 12 and Model 97's shown

Some fine pump guns indeed- the one Model 12 at the bottom of the five shotgun foto looks-by shape of pistol grip- to be the "earlier" perch belly pre-l934-35 style- also one of the two Model 97's on the three ills. the top one has a different pistol grip style that the bottom one does-great shotguns- And I believe Winchester made the M97 until about 1957-58- heard someone found a M97 prototype in 20 gauge-would sure like to see that one. SD:rofl:
 

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The first gun I ever purchased: Ithica model 37 featherweight 12ga. (26 years ago)
It was the only shotgun I owned until this year.

My dad only owns one shotgun, a four digit serial numbered Ithica 12ga that my grandfather bought new for 26 bucks. That gun is ugly from all the years of heavy use, but still works great.
 

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Gunner, what are those hump-backed pump guns? I don't think I ever remember seeing one like that. I think I've found a companion to my A5 (which I voted for - as long as it's a sweet sixteen).
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Gunner, what are those hump-backed pump guns? I don't think I ever remember seeing one like that. I think I've found a companion to my A5 (which I voted for - as long as it's a sweet sixteen).
Stevens Model 520 trench gun. The Stevens Model 520 is a classic
John Moses Browning design. The Stevens Model 520 entered the marketplace early in 1904. It would stay in production until the similarly-designed but more streamlined Model 620 completely supplanted it in 1932.

The Model 520 has a long history as a fighting shotgun. The history of Stevens fighting shotguns goes back at least to the days when a Stevens-manufactured Wells Fargo 'messenger gun' The early 520s featured the 'humpback' receiver typical of the Browning Auto 5 shotgun, plus an additional "step" machined into the top of the receiver profile. Later 520s had a straight profile to the top of the receiver. Also, the early 520s had the old style Browning 'suicide safety,' a sliding safety bar set into the front of the trigger guard and protuding inside, that had to be pushed forward to fire and slid back to safe.

The military version of the Model 520 made a good impression on the War Department, but it arrived on the scene too late to really compete with designs from Remington and Winchester. Still, it is believed that a small number of Model 520 Trench Guns were delivered to the War Department before the Armistice was signed. With the Armistice, all military contracts were cancelled.In the frantic era of rearming after Pearl Harbor, all of Stevens' warehuse repeaters- including the Model 520s- were purchased by the War Deprtment. They were considered standard military shotguns until 1943, despite the shortage of spare parts available from the factory. Some of these shotguns were equipped with the trench gun bayonet adapters. About 35,000 Model 520s wore the US and flaming bomb ordnance marks during WW2.

After WWII ended, many of these guns went back to the arsenals. Some of them later found their way to participation in the conflict in Southeast Asia.
 

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Thanks for the info. In the picture, I would have guessed it was a M37 at first based on the curve in front of the magazine. I really like the A5 type receiver, I've definitely found my new quest.

And thanks for the history lesson.
 

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Gunner, thanks for the lead on my new quest!

I just found a 520 (marked Ranger, not Stevens, but same thing) and walked home with it for $100! The gun is in fantastic shape, I'd say at least 80%, not bad for a gun that's about 100 years old. Great bluing, good trigger and very tight action, polychoke and it has the old model suicide safety.

Funny thing is that I've been trying to find a "trunk gun" in 12 gauge, since most of my hunting guns are 16s - I figured a 12 ga would make more sense as a spare, since I can't always find 16ga ammo, and would be SOL if something happened on a hunting trip (or I just forgot to bring my ammo). My favorite gun store is now LOUSY with 16 gauges, including a 520 and a decent priced 745 (the copy of the A5) - but he had no "cool" 12 gauges. All they had was tacticool stuff that I can get anywhere. I like my gun to stand out in the rack as different, and I think I've succeded.

Now to find disassembly instructions.
 

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When a candidate is asked a question about their Second Amendment position,
and the response is 'I will protect hunters' rights and guns,' translate that to mean;
'Every firearm other than a shotgun or bolt action rifle is on the table to be restricted.' Timidi mater non flet !
 

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Discussion Starter #34
10-26-2007 wow ! Still hanging in after all this time :look:
 
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