Firearm Forums - Arms Locker banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just quickly, could anyone tell me about wax bullets? Are they actually made of wax, or some other substance? Do they come in a wide range of calibers?
Can rifles use them, or would the power be to great and warp the bullet and coat the inside of the barrel, and can you shoot them at humans?
Imagine a military exercise. They want accurate ballistics, the stuff youd find on the field, with normal weapons. Paint balls have to use air hoses and tanks and all that, dont they? I was going to put this into the ammunition thread, but guessed that more people view this one. Ta, Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
just quickly, could anyone tell me about wax bullets? Are they actually made of wax, or some other substance? Do they come in a wide range of calibers?

Wax bullets are generally made from canning wax. They can be made in a wide variety of calibers.

Can rifles use them, or would the power be to great and warp the bullet and coat the inside of the barrel, and can you shoot them at humans?

AFAIK not usable in rifles. Don't shoot wax bullets at humans or animals.


Imagine a military exercise. They want accurate ballistics, the stuff youd find on the field, with normal weapons. Paint balls have to use air hoses and tanks and all that, dont they?

Paintball guns here in the USA use CO2 cannisters inserted into the gun and good for up to 100+ shots. No bulky cannisters or air hoses etc. Nowadays the military uses lasers and the trainees wear light reactive vests/suits.

RIKA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
are these CO2 guns specially made, or can you insert them into any sort of gun/rifle. Would these have been available in 1962? and do they have safetys? if they are specially made, are they big? around the size of teh average .38, or something more along the line of an M16? and do you know the rate of fire? and how loud are they? Do you hear a sharp crack when they fire, of some sort of hissing sound?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
Yes they are specially made and stand alone. Not inserted into a firearm. Not available in 1962. Think they became popular in the (early?) 1990's. Some have safetys. Specially made to fire paintballs only. Handguns are BIG and NOT concealable. Rifles go from around Steyer AUG size to M16 size. Rate of fire, I guess at maybe 100 rpm. Some can shoot semi and full auto.

RIKA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
would you have any idea what they could have used in 1962 for training? I'm talking about some sort of elite course, adn everyones wearing full battle gear, flak jackets and helmets, possibley even full face, but I'll have to look into the one a bit more. Probably limit visibility too much . . Surely they could have used wax bullets there? I dont know the first thing about them, but maybe they could have quite soft wax, and use less gun-powder, adn use muzzle brakes. But the only places I've heard of muzzle brakes being used is on artillery pieces, ive no idea if they could be used on personal weapons. And this was a long time ago. They probably would have been pretty naive back then, umm, comparison . . women. back in the early 19 hundreds it was considered general knowledge that women could not work and were only good for chores around the house. Nowadays, thinking like that would be shunned by the public. things that were commonly accepted a long time ago might be totally wrong these days
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
From books that I've read, the FBI was about as elite as you could get. Back then they used revolvers and trained in a mock-up town called Hogans Alley. They trained on static and moving targets. The shotgun and the Thompson SMG were big back then. Don't know if they used wax bullets in man to man duels.

Wax bullets don't use gunpowder. They are primer powered only and were in use since the 40's, maybe the 30's. Have read that an accidental discharge caused a very big welt where the bullet hit.

As for women in the 1900's. Well, I'm a woman and would have been extremely rebellious back then and probably called a lesbian **** or worse. I say called because I like men's type activities and will not obey orders (if at all) like a mindless child. I'm not a lesbian or a masculine female.

RIKA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'll look into this Hogans Alley place. So all these bullets caused was a welt. Probably very painful. If one hit you on the chest, would it wind you, do you know? Can wax bullets be fired from any handgun, like, can you put them into magazines? And just having their primer charge double as thier propelling charge would effect the bullets ballistics greately, wouldn't it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
OOh. If one of those wax bullets hit me in the chest I'd be yelling like a girl (which I am :D ). Yes,you can put them into magazines but when you fire them they won't cycle a semi-auto's action - must reload by hand. You can't double charge the primer.

In your fiction book, I'd have them walking through some kind of training scenario like Bond did in From Russia with Love when Rosa Klebb walked through the training area on Smersh Island. More realistic than fooling with wax bullets. At least for 1962. You could even use human subjects like in the movie.

You see I'm a frustrated author too.

Best

RIKA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,117 Posts
yes, paraffin is used, could have been used as far back as the SA Colt .45 Peacemaker, 1873, altho petroleumproducts weren't widely available until the turn of the century, they could have used beeswax for the projectiles. They dont work the slide, or feed from the mag of autoloaders. Nor will they work in rifles. Only the primer is used to propel the wax. There's no recoil or gas to work the action, so if you want more than a single shot, you have to use a revolver. Even then, the primers set back, and tie up the revolver'srotation, unless you first drill out the flashholes between the primer pocket in the cartridge case, and the main area of the case, where the gunpowder normally sits. In a rifle barrle, there's too much friction for the wax to stand up too, so it doesn't work worth a hoot. It doesn't work well in 9mm or .38, either, because those cases use a small pistol primer. The .45 auto cartridge case uses a large pistol primer. So does the .45 L Colt and .44 mag revolver cases, of course, but they hold the wax a long ways from the primer, wasting some of that primer's pretty limited power. All you do is soften a slab of paraffin by floating it on hot tap water for a minute, turn it over for another minute, and then use your thumb to press the cases thru the wax, one at a time. They make as much noise as a handclap, will kill small birds at 20 ft, and fall harmlessly to earth after about 60 ft of travel in the air.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
to raider, it is set in a training scene kind of scene. Kind of a military evaluation course. And I can't have the dudes reloading after every shot. It won't work. So I guess I'll have to use a revolver. Does the us military make wax bullets, or could they? It is a fictional account, so some military ammo supplier could get special orders to make wax rounds that put the firing pin back in place. I think thats what you mean. I only read it once. It's a pity that wax bullets only go about 60 feet, why couldn't they have laser guns in 1962, dammit! I'll have to make do wiht what I've got.
Are wax bullets very accurate? If you were above someone, could you snipe at them? And how much does a primer flash when fired? These guys are using generation 1 NVGs, so a small flash would be noticible, but not anything tiny. Ta
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
A person on another board said that they were extremely accurate to around 10ft. Yes you could snipe and do close range simulated combat with them. The wax mark on your clothing would definitely indicate a hit. Using only the primer for power you would not have a flash. Probably not visible even with Gen 1 NVGs. I think you could get away with having a fictional supplier make up a special run of wax bullets.

RIKA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,117 Posts
uh, do you understand ANYTHING about terminal ballistics? The wax bullet, at 10 ft or so, raises a NASTY blood blister on flesh,but that's all. Why not just change the time setting of your writing? Dean Koontz once wrote a great book about Nazis having mastered time travel, and coming into the future.Of course, he "thought' that Uzi's have 400 rd magazines, too, :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
uh, do you understand ANYTHING about writing a book? :laugh: nah, time machines just wouldn't work in the peice I'm writing,unfortunately. simple lasers would be so nice.
So, at 10 feet wax bullets will give you some nasty bruises, and will give you quite a shock past then up to about fifty feet? And how much noise can you hear when just the primer is fired? A loud clap? A thunderous boom?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,117 Posts
handclap loud, NO, at 50 ft being hit with one, wearing a shirt, you might think somebody tossed a pebble at you. I've writting a "how to" silencer making book that's sold 150,000 copies, in 10 years.NOBODY takes ads for such a book, you know that? Only Paladin Press's book catalog, their website, and for the past 2-3 years, they've sold it on Amazon.com and WalMart's website. It's 8."x5.5", 67 pages, 12 of which are of drawings. :) You will end up making GLARING technical errors about the gun and shooting side of things, dude. You need to spend about a year reading books about these subjects, and getting a lot of hands-on experience. The latter will cost thousands of $and take hundreds of hours. Sorry, but that's the reality of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
yeah, andy, I know. I'm just getting this info to do the first draft on a scene. I know I'll have to get heaps of hands on experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,117 Posts
Read some books by Stephen Hunter, Donald Hamilton

Dean Koontz, Stephen King, Tom Clancy,and Ayn Rand,if you want to learn how to create excitement, authenticism, and "flow" of your words
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,117 Posts
He's a bit lame on some of the details, but so

was Ayn Rand. Atlas Shrugged is the best selling novel of all time, ya know. She got 15% of retail, and had publishers COURTING her for that book. It took her 12 years to write it. She said she rewrote each page at least 4x. It's STILL selling 200,000 copies per yer, mostly in hardback, for libraries. It's been printed in over 80 languages, and first came out in 1957. :)
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top