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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
All kinds of rumour's floating around the Internet. Snap on suppressors that require no barrel threading, suppressors that are made to fit multiple guns, a dozen companies with ready to go models just waiting for the law to pass. Anyone here know what the real story is?
 

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On the Hearing Protection Act, I'd love to see it; but if it does happen, I expect it'll be nearer the next election to garner political support (from us ignorant ********) for anyone who does support it. If/when it does pass, I certainly plan to make some rimfire and pistol-caliber suppressors myself.

There is a LOT of experimenting and development going on with suppressors now. I saw a video of one a couple months ago that allegedly didn't use baffles or a monocore either one, and so (allegedly) didn't increase backpressure the way suppressors always have. Don't recall the name or details, and don't know if it's real or a scam frankly.

Multi-caliber suppressors are definitely a major thing now, but with some unavoidable limitations. Keeping a suppressor lightweight enough to make it function on a tilting-barrel pistol action (glock, browning, 1911, etc) tends to make it less than robust enough to take on heavy, high-pressure rifle stuff. There's also the non-power-related issues. A high-pressure rifle suppressor doesn't need to be disassemble-able (if that's a word) for cleaning; the pressure of the rounds keep stuff blown out & free. I was concerned about this when I bought my first rifle suppressor and contacted the manufacturer, and they assured me that on a .223/5.56 it's not an issue due to the heat & pressure extremes keeping things purged from inside. But on a low-pressure caliber, stuff will be deposited inside that does need to be cleaned out, which means the suppressor really needs to be opened up & cleaned on occasion. If you don't, it'll literally build up inside until it kills the effectiveness of the suppressor:


Lately, in addition to making suppressors for "this caliber" or "that caliber", mfrs are making suppressors for "up to a ___ diameter bullet" at "up to ___ PSI" with "a minimum barrel length of ___". The Omega and Mystic-X are examples of this. I have a Mystic-X that (if my math & memory are correct) is now at Day 298 of ATF wait time. It's 8" long, 1 3/8" in diameter, and there's a long chart of what it can be used for, from .22 rimfire (because it can be disassembled & cleaned) up to 7.62x39, 5.56, 9mm, and a bunch of others. If the serial number is above MX2600 (which mine is), they have redesigned & reinforced innards, so that with a fixed-barrel adapter that's 1.4" in length. It creates a larger initial blast chamber and allows use on calibers up to & including .300 Win Mag. So with one ATF stamp - and one ATF wait - you have an 8", 10.5 ounce suppressor that works for rimfire calibers, pistol calibers up to .357 Herrett, and lower-pressure rifle stuff like .30 carbine and .300 blackout subsonic. For that matter, in threading it in place it goes back around a half-inch onto the barrel threads, so it really only adds about 7.5" to overall firearm length, not the full 8" of suppressor length.

Adding the adapter increases the blast chamber and internal volume enough to allow use of all the other calibers listed, up to full power 300 win mag, as long as it's on at least an 18" barrel.

I figure that other than when using special adapters with certain guns (Nielsen booster may be necessary on some 9mm pistols, etc), I'll probably just leave the fixed high-pressure adapter on it 90+ percent of the time. It's still only adding ~8.9 inches to overall length, avoids the hassle of swapping back & forth, and the added internal expansion volume will make it slightly quieter.

Didn't mean to turn this into a commercial for the Mystic-X, but it's a good example of the "multi-caliber suppressor" thing that has grown and probably will continue to do so even more.

Fwiw - http://libertycans.net/mystic-x/

Main reason I went with the Mystic-X over the Omega, is that the Omega is limited to .30-caliber vs. the Mystic-X's .35 caliber; and I shoot a lot of .35-caliber stuff from 9mm to .357 magnum.

{edit - can't believe I failed to include Mystic-X porn. You can see that the baffles nearest the muzzle are thicker and have reinforcing ribs, as this is where the blast is strongest:


The adaptor for high-pressure rifle stuff; I pulled one from its package to measure and corrected the info above - it adds 1.4" to overall length:
 
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