Firearm Forums - Arms Locker banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,382 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the story below, you will see one aspect of why long range accuracy is critical. On the flip side, you want to be able to counter such a problem if you were the 4 guys on the receiving end...

Mike



FALLUJAH, Iraq (Nov. 27, 2004) -- A U.S. Marine sniper waited patiently inside a one-story house deep within the city. Lying in the prone position for several hours, he scanned the area through his scope before he finally found the three insurgents responsible for two previous mortar attacks.


Sgt. Memo M. Sandoval, a platoon sergeant with Scout Sniper Platoon, Headquarters and Service Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, needed to positively identify the insurgents before he could take his shot.


Sandoval, 26, saw that one of the men was about to place a mortar in a mortar tube. He knew he had to make a well-aimed shot before the insurgent gunner launched the deadly round. Sandoval cleared his thoughts and slowed his breathing as he gently squeezed the trigger of his M-40A3 sniper rifle. The 7.62 mm round covered the 950 yards in a flash, slamming into the chest of the first insurgent.


"The battalion (executive officer) ordered me to 'make the mortars stop,'" said Sandoval, a native of El Paso, Texas. "I took it personally and went out specifically to stop the insurgents."


With two more insurgents still alive and ready to continue the mortar attack, Sandoval composed himself for the next shot at the assistant gunner. The last two shots took out the driver of the vehicle that carried the weapon.


"When I finally spotted them along a tree line, I realized how far they were but it was surprising how easy it was," said Sandoval.


Those four shots were the longest in Sandoval has taken since he became a scout sniper.


"It was very impressive of Sandoval to shoot from so far away and be on target with all four shots," said 1st Lt. Samuel Rosales, a platoon commander with Scout Sniper Platoon, H&S Co., 3/5.


"When you are being mortared you never know where they will land, to be able to stop them from shooting anymore felt good," said Sandoval.


He joined the Marine Corps straight out of high school in 1997 and has been with 3/5 since April. His leadership ability has reflected on the Marines around him and allowed Sandoval to accomplish his mission.


"(Sandoval) is filling a staff noncommissioned officer's billet, He is a great Marine to work with," said Rosales, 32, a native of San Clemente, Calif.


After recently reenlisting for four more years, Sandoval, who has been in Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom since September, hopes to represent the United States in the Olympics in competition shooting.


Sandoval says a fellow Marine, Staff Sgt. Jared M. Casanova, with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, helped him improve his skills with the rifle, which has become a valuable commodity in Iraq.


"We have always been in competitions against each other, one day he would win and the next day I would win," said Sandoval. "Out here in Iraq it is a two way rifle range, with insurgents shooting at you. You have to make well aimed shots."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
Some people dismiss long distance shooting as impossible because it requires great discipline and dedication, along with some talent, to learn as well as the right equipment. Most of us would rather be overqualified in those areas that can save our lives than the opposite. Sgt. Sandoval certainly saved lives by using his rifle skill that day. That same skill is just as valuable for civilian shtf or for any other life and death event requiring a rifle. Anyone who would deny this fact is totally ignorant of what it takes to survive and win.

Good post Mike.

RIKA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,761 Posts
Outstanding shooting!
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top