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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was at the local Walmart last night to pick up some 30/06 cartridges and noticed a tiny little rifle sitting in the gun rack.
It was a little 22LR called the Crickett. It had a synthetic stock, blued barrel and retailed for approximately $109.00.
This got me thinking about the fun me and my 8 year old daughter could share together(target shooting, Squirrel hunting).
The only thing that kept me from buying it was it seemed to be of relatively poor quality.
I would really like to get her a 10/22 but can't seem to find a youth model.
Does anyone out there own one of these guns or know of another suitably sized model(must be drilled and tapped) that is made better.
Thanks
 
G

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well jackie ya might want to try finding a marlin papoose. it is a 22lr semiauto,clip fed rifle. . i have the take down model it is a little smaller than the none takedown model. i am teaching my gf 12 and 13 yo to shoot with it.the takedown model seems to fit their hands and arm lenght better.. than in fits mine..

good luck:eek:)
 

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Take a look at the Armscor model 14Y. In my opinion, this is a nice youth sized rifle. I have had one for a few years now - and my son used to shoot it quite a bit. He started when he was around 8 or 9 with this one. He is now 13 and he still shoots it some but now enjoys man sized rifles as he is now 13 and pretty big. The youth sized rifle is the way to go for the young shooter. Try to start em out with too big and heavy a rifle and they may loose interest quickly.

I actually had to run to the arms locker to take ours out and look at the model number. I thought it was 14Y but was not sure because I could not find it in my Blue book of Gun Values. They list a 12Y and 14P (if I remember correctly the directions that came with mine were for the 14P which is a larger version). Unlike the Cricket, it is a magazine fed bolt action rifle, and if I remember right, the mag holds six rounds (maybe more - it has been a while). Of course you can always load it one shot at a time manually if you want. I much prefer to start off a new shooter on a single shot or a bolt action repeater rather than a semi auto. This helps teach patience, and paying attention to the detail of how the rifle works, and emphasizes safety when having to manually reload after each shot as opposed to simply staying sighted in on target and again squeezing the trigger of a semi auto. Sure you can teach patience and safety with a semi auto; but a single shot or bolt action repeater in the hands of a novice shooter is inherently much safer than a semi auto in those same hands.

Back to the Armscor 14Y. The quality, at least to me, seems better than a Cricket. I can vouch that mine has never had any problems that I can think of now. Again it is a youth sized rifle, bolt action box magazine fed repeater. It has a blue finish, and a wood stock. I believe, that besides the stock, it is all metal construction - such as the trigger, trigger guard and so on. It feeds any ammo we give it. It is fairly accurate for a plinker - certainly good enough to instill confidence in the new shooter, and it is probably capable of better groups than most shooters can shoot. The rear sight is adjustable for elevation. The front sight is hooded.

This is a nice little rifle, imported from the Philippines - and although not made in the USA, the Philippines was one of our allies last time I checked. Not a bad deal, and not a lot of money in the event you get one that is not as good as mine. My guess would be though, that at least when mine was made, quality control was pretty good at Armscor.
Hope this was helpful.

Best regards and safe shooting,
Glenn B;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies!
After mulling it over I went ahead and got the Crickett. I figured for $100.00 it would be worth a try.
Who knows maybe this little thing will actually be a decent shooter!
On Dec. 26 we will be heading to the range and if she does well maybe squeeze in a little Squirrel hunting.
 

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Jackie, it's a shame you and your daughter live so far away from north Florida. Come spring when my bamboo starts shooting, I would hire both of you to stand guard against the squirrels that tear up those new shoots every year.

If anyone has mini Claymores, I would be interested in buying them from you...... :uzi:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Rich,
I wish I were closer too. I would be more than happy to help alleviate your Squirrel problem!
Its a shame you don't have a coyote problem also since that would push me over the edge to make the long drive LOL!

On another note I managed to bag a few nice Whitetail this season with my trusty new stainless T/C Encore (30/06). Both one shot kills and one was from a distance of approximately 300 yards. Man just equip these things with a decent scope and they will try their hardest to throw all of the shots through one hole.
 

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one suggestion reguarding the 10/22 option

this one may be called a hack job but if done properly will look fine and work well. :rolleyes:

you will find on gunbroker and most other firearms auction sites used 10/22 parts as people will sell them after upgrading thier own rifle.

i have bought 10/22 stock barrels for $20.00 not brand new but in rather serviceable condition. have seen stocks for $10-$30 these are not special stocks just the cheap stock that comes on the low end 10/22(believe they are made of ash) there is nothing to stop you from cutting one down to the length of pull you desire. there are a great many after market recoil pads and/or butt pads that can be ground to shape on a belt sander. with a little effort and a second hand spare stock the rifle should be able to last well thoughout thier growing years if not longer.

minimal wood working skill required.

just a suggestion as 10/22's are not collectors items and not costly you could try a lot of modifications with little outlay of cash.

hope this was of some help and have a merry christmas
sean
 

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:headbang:
:rolleyes:
:bawling:
UMMMMM.....
it would seem i have given out a piece of misinformation.
not ash stock....but birch.
my humblest apologies.
:bawling:
sean
 

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Youth sized .22 - Try the "Chipmunk" rifle. It is made in Medford Oregon, that is the rifle that I started on and she is still sitting in my safe waiting for a little tuna to take her out. Single shot, bolt action, peep sights, and is sized just right for anyone aged 6 - 10. Well made rifle and as I remember, very accurate.
 

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JackieLapradd said:
I was at the local Walmart last night to pick up some 30/06 cartridges and noticed a tiny little rifle sitting in the gun rack.
It was a little 22LR called the Crickett. It had a synthetic stock, blued barrel and retailed for approximately $109.00.
This got me thinking about the fun me and my 8 year old daughter could share together(target shooting, Squirrel hunting).
The only thing that kept me from buying it was it seemed to be of relatively poor quality.
I would really like to get her a 10/22 but can't seem to find a youth model.
Does anyone out there own one of these guns or know of another suitably sized model(must be drilled and tapped) that is made better.
Thanks

My daughter loved to shoot her 22, I had to cut 4" off the stock when she was 12, when she turned 25 I put it back on the gun and we went shooting again. That 10/22 is hard to beat. :)
 
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